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  1. 2 points
    Trevor, Thanks for the info. You were correct, I had not connected the temp sender wire. It is a bugger of a thing to locate and even more difficult to fit the connector when the entire loom is in situ. The sender unit is tucked in behind the plastic spark plug channel. Done now, so everything is fine. Thanks again, Alan.
  2. 1 point
    Welcome to the club. First you need to check and make sure the battery is good. If it's good then with that amount of miles it's a good bet that the starter has died.
  3. 1 point
    Was the valet key stolen when the car was parked where you frequently park it? If not, the thief might not find your car again. You might be able to have the all the keys "deleted" from the vehicle ECU memory and then have the keys you still have programmed back in. The thief would still be able to unlock and gain access to your car but the stolen valet key could not be used to start the engine. If that is not good enough, yes, you can have the service center replace and program new keys but there will be significant expense to change the door and trunk locks and the ignition switch. Insurance may cover much or all of the cost if you have it.
  4. 1 point
    See if this one works Swigzy Car Cup Holder Expander Adapter with Adjustable Base - Rubber Tabs Securely Hold Large Water Bottles
  5. 1 point
    as a NEW member, the FIRST thing you need to do is SEARCH other people's steering problems, this has been covered for years. there are even videos showing you how to fix it.. THEN if you dont understand, ask for help. a 5 cent garden hose washer will fix it (usually). see videos.. 2 screws to remove the covers, then 3 screws to remove the plate and you are looking at it.
  6. 1 point
    ok, I have a 99ls, bought in early 2010, I wrapped my alternator in a clorex bottle and it has been working for 7 years now
  7. 1 point
    If you want to save $350 or more, you can also carefully remove the sensor, drill out a 1/16 through hole at the center of the rotary arm & stationary portion...then screw the rotary arm back in place with a tiny screw. I just finished this on mine & it works great. **Just make sure you have a low profile screw head so it doesn't bind into the silver sway arm. Also, you want to wallow out the rotary arm hole a little bigger than the screw - that way the screw only holds into the stationary sensor portion. You don't want the rotary arm engaged w/ the screw trying to turn it. I kept bumping the "trunk close" button when trying to pull away the trunk lid trim. If you remove the 2 top right fuses 10A & 5A in the left trunk fuse block, the trunk lights & trunk operation will stop while you work on the sensor.
  8. 1 point
    I always apply some PTFE tape (plumbers use it for pipe joints) to the sump plug thread....never had a leak on anything ever since. This originally came about when I owned a Land Cruiser and the Toyota dealer asked whether I wanted the soft or hard compound seal for the plug. I foolishly chose the hard compound and leaked like a sieve. Someone suggested removing it and wrapping a couple of turns with PTFE and it worked a treat...nowadays I use it all the time on the 'belt & braces' principle.
  9. 1 point
    Have you checked that the plastic casing/cap on the filter housing aren't cracked?
  10. 1 point
    Did they clean the area where is was originally leaking? Also did they clean the under panels? Maybe just more residual.
  11. 1 point
    Going to pickup a 1995 sc300 5 speed in teal mist metallic this weekend.
  12. 1 point
    Adding a backup camera to a 2001-2003 LS430 is rather involved. There is a post on ClubLexus on how to do it on an LS430 with the Mark Lev system but I don't know if would work for the standard nav system: https://www.clublexus.com/forums/ls-3rd-gen-2001-2006/511807-how-to-ls430-mark-levinson-everything-w-pics-and-part-s.html#post5620270 If you can't see the attachments in that post, here is a direct link to the YouTube video about it:
  13. 1 point
    Still a few of us around though I upgraded to a 430 then 460L I still have the 98 that stays parked most of the time.
  14. 1 point
    https://lexusenthusiast.com/2018/10/25/lexus-named-most-reliable-brand-in-annual-co Consumer Reports says no to MB and BMW!!! Paul
  15. 1 point
    Thanks Trevor for your answer! I have visited Lexus dealer today to they check vibration. Luckily they had a time to check that out. They check balance (did not find anything). Also they make a wheel rotation. Thats all they did. The vibration is now much much lower. Now it feels more like light tingle what could be felt only on good new freeway asphalt. So I probably will wait little while if this gets worse or may be better. This sounds strange that vinbration was almost fixed by the wheel rotation...
  16. 1 point
    Struts are discussed all the time, but my choice is KYB struts and OE mounts....Have put them on RX300 and RX400h and a GMC Yukon....Love these struts. the knock noise is probably broken mount, but could also be a damaged stabilizer bar mount....
  17. 1 point
    So got a reply, said any Toyota dealer can do lease work on a Lexus if no Lex dealer available. Now we know and knowledge is power! 🙂
  18. 1 point
    I have a 1999 GS-300 with 130,000 miles on it. Had lots of issues with the vehicle cranking over recently. Got into my car turned the ignition and click, nothing happened. Tried to crank the engine again and click! Nothing again...... My battery was my 1st thought but, my lights were bright and radio and fan were working right. So I saw a couple postings on the lexus owners club and thought I would tackle this job myself. This problem was intermittent, sometimes the car turned over and sometimes it didn't. Recently it would take me up to 10 minutes for the car to crank over and start, so I had to do something. I just finished up the job in about 2 hours (start to finish) and thought somebody might read this and make it useful. So here I go to try and tell you how to fix the starter problem and tell you what tools you'll need. Actually after doing the job it was well worth the effort. The problem turned out to be the "Copper Contacts inside the Starter Solenoid" with a total bill of $5.00 (yep I said Five Dollars if you do it yourself). Before you begin, locate your local Alternator/Starter Rebuilding Shop, you'll need them for the Copper Contacts that are located inside the Starter Solenoid ($5.Dollars) They sold them to me separately. Tools required: Patience, 10mm., 12mm.,14mm.,15mm,16mm socket, socket wrench, universal swivel socket attachment, (2) Extra Long Socket Extensions 12"inches each, 9/32"nds nut runner or socket. So here we go: Step by step 1st Things First - you'll need to disconnect your battery to the car both positive and negative leads. Pop your hood. You need a 10 mm. socket and socket wrench to disconnect the battery. (Remember, you'll lose all your settings on your radio, seat memory etc.... but worth it - and if you have any warning light on your dash, like check engine light they'll go off too after you disconnect and reconnect the battery.) The starter and solenoid are located on the driver side of the car engine. They are piggybacked next to each other in one unit. 2nd - you need to disconnect the transmission dip stick to move it out of your way to get the starter out. (You'll need a 12mm. socket with socket wrench) The bolt is located at the top of the dip stick that is attached to the engine. Feel free to pull the dip stick all the way out and put it in a safe place. You don't actually need to take the outside shell of the dip stick out all the way just pull it out about 4 inches and move it to the right or left, it's attached at the bottom by a rubber wire holding clamp. Just move it aside for now. 3rd - Disconnect the lead wires that are going to the starter, there are two - one is a black push connector that you must push the center button in to remove the wire connector as you pull the wire out, and the other is under the rubber black boot that is the power connection that is coming from your battery. Pull back the black rubber boot and expose the 12 mm. nut that must be removed to get the cable off the starter. You'll need a 12mm. socket and wrench to get this nut off. Once you remove the cable put the 12mm. nut back on the starter so it doen't get lost. 4th - Crawl under your vehicle and take your 14 mm. socket, socket wrench and swivel adapter with you with (2) Extra Long 12" inch extentions, you'll need the extra lengths to get the bolts to turn and free your rachet up to swing and loosen the 14mm. bolt heads. Don't take the bolts out all the way, leave them in housing as long as the starter is able to come out. The only reason I say this is because the starter will be easier to re-install once your done fixing it. Now, take your starter out from the bottom, it's a little tight but it will come out. 5th - Put your starter on a work bench or preferably a Vice to hold the starter in place so it won't fall. Locate the (3) 9/32" inch cover nuts and remove them with a 9/32" inch nut runner or socket. Take care not to lose the nuts. Remove the top cover of the solenoid. Once you remove the top cover you'll see the two copper contacts on opposite sides of the solenoid. Remove the center copper solenoid, be careful because at the bottom of the solenoid is a pointed tip with a long 3" spring that actually pushed the started gear out once powered on with your ignition key. Put this center solenoid off to the side with the 3" Spring. Now locate the two copper contacts on opposite sides of the solenoid housing (these are the contacts that need to be replaced.. these are the parts that are causing all your problems with your starter - all for $5 Bucks, notice how black and pitted the copper contacts are). At this point this is where I actually took my whole starter to a Alternator/Starter Rebuildng Shop in a plastic bag with the solenoid cover off and showed them the starter and contacts and they had them in stock. (The 2 Copper Contacts) were tiny copper 90 degree clips with a 1/4 Moon Shape to them, no larger than 1 1/2"inches and no bigger than a quarter. Once I got the Copper Contacts back home the fun started! I can't believe how little they were and how easy they were going to be replaced for just $5. Five bucks. This was going to save me a ton of money. Now this is where you'll need to take the (2) nuts off the one side of the solenoid, one nut (12 mm.) is where we originally removed the cable wire from the battery and there is another nut that holds the copper contact into place. I think this is a 15mm. socket (but don't quote me on this one - sorry I forgot what size it was), but remove this nut also, this is the last nut holding the copper contact into place. Once you remove the nut you'll be able to slide the copper contact out, but be careful not to lose the thin washer and small rubber O-Ring attached to the Copper Contact Post. One side of the contact is a Rectangular Copper Square attached to a Copper Post the Copper Contact actually slides over the post for mounting purposes. Take note how the contact is positioned because you'll have to re-install the NEW Copper Contact the same way. You can remove the contact now. Make sure you note what Copper Contact goes where, one is larger than the other. Replace the contact with the same NEW COPPER CONTACT and re-install the same way. Now on the opposite side, slide back the rubber boot that is covering the other contact post bolt and nuts. Be careful because their is another small washer and "O-Ring" on the other side too. Take care to remove the Copper Contacts the same way and install the other NEW COPPER CONTACT and re-install the same way. Re-assemble the Nuts in the same manner and tighten. Slide the boot cover back over the post and re-assemble putting the center solenoid back inside the housing, re-install the cover of the solenoid. Your starter solenoid is now complete. Re-assemble everything is reverse order and now your done. Hope this helps the Do-It-Yourself Guys. Any questions, feel free to comment me back. Hope I didn't miss anything.... Blaise
  19. 1 point
    Oh wow! a fascinating country to visit....make sure you post up some photos, especially if you visit the Lexus factory
  20. 1 point
    Nice! Thought maybe I should share some more recent pics of my RX, the bumper and skid plates are still a work in progress.
  21. 1 point
    The rx400h has rear struts, the 450h has the spring and shocks
  22. 1 point
    I will put an end to this mystery..... these are the trim finish panels that fit the "hole" in all 4 doors, you cant see them, but your fingers feel them when you use the opening to close the door.... they seem to fit 95-2000
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
    I asked this before and didn't really get a reply, so I'm gonna ask again before throwing up my hands and going to the dealer. It's summer right now, so I don't usually worry too much about the traction control, though I do prefer to have it off (it sucks to have your wheels fail to spinf when you're trying to peel out). But now, when I press the 'TRAC Off' button, nothing happens. Not only does the TRAC system not disengage, but the button won't even click in to place. The dash light doesn't come on and even when I push the button firmly, it fails to click in and stay depressed. This leads me to believe that it could be the button and not the whole system, though that may just be wishful thinking on my part. If any of you have any ideas or have encountered this issue before, leet me know, because right now I'm a little stumped. I guess the next step is to take out the switch and make sure there's nothing obviously broken on that. If anyone's done this....
  25. 1 point
    I Had this problem a number of times with mine. My SC is gone now, rest it's soul. But I did have a pretty permanent fix for this. I hand bent the rod back to about the right shape, and I installed it with the regular clip (i still have a box of them and could send a couple if needed). Then I took a medium sized zip tie and went around the whole clip and rod below the "L", then also around the flat metal piece that activates the rod when you pull the handle. I left the zip tie just ever so slightly loose so there was play in it. The idea is the zip tie stops the rod from torquing the clip wrong, but does not actually hold everything tightly in place. It holds it all loosely in place. Anyway, the fix lasted years--the rest of the car's life. Let me know if you need some clips. I believe i have a small box of ten for each side. I would be willing to share a couple (but one day i want another SC)
  26. 1 point
    I had this same issue with my'95 SC400 a couple years ago. The 'bar' mentioned by the dealer is no more than a short metal rod and used ones can usually be found on eBay for a few bucks. Be certain you are buying the one for your year and model, as there are several types. The attachment clips are plastic and can also be purchased new from Toyota or on eBay for a few bucks each. Any competent mechanic should be able to do this repair - dealer not required. The driver side door lock linkage is different from the right side but the clips are universal. The hardest part of the job is removing and replacing the door panel but YouTube videos are available on how-to. BTW, this is a very common problem with Toyotas and Lexus because of (guess what) that aging of that plastic clip which eventually becomes brittle and breaks. I cannot imagine why Toyota didn't use a metal clip as they did in the good old days. I suppose the answer to that is a guaranteed $500 repair somewhere down the line.
  27. 1 point
    I know you are right, old satan just slips up on me sometimes too....
  28. 1 point
    Hi Craig Yes i saw your post sometime back, but do you think that if i reach out to Lexus at this point of time they will entertain? considering that the car was imported to UAE, i will try to reach them and will report back, From your post what i can understand you did managed to change it in the year 2014, so i am guessing i still have a chance Looking at the PDF of the SSC, my VIN number falls within that range which is specified as compared below campaign-ssc-wl2-1998-gs400-ls400-sc400-ecm-replacement.pdf
  29. 1 point
    Thanks for your response. After looking at the design I decided not to take the chance and just returned the CRC for a refund, pointing out the note on the can about Lexus,
  30. 1 point
    I sold my nearly cosmetically and mechanically perfect 2000 LS400 Platinum Series "SF" (heated seats, originally had Nakamichi audio) in Spring, 2014 for $4999. It was at just under 180,000 miles and virtually flawless inside and out - always garaged. The car looked like it just rolled off the showroom floor. The $4999 included flawless chrome OEM Platinum wheels and extra aftermarket wheels with winter tires. All eight tires were in excellent condition. Professionally maintained with full documentation. Synthetic engine oil changes every 5,000 mlles and transmission/differential fluid changes every 30,000 miles. The Nakamichi head unit had been professionally replaced with a modern aftermarket screen based in-dash system with Bluetooth handsfree phone and A2DP wireless audio steaming, iPod control, Pandora interface and many other features including provision for satellite radio and backup camera. The attached photo was taken a few days before I sold the car. What is yours like?
  31. 1 point
    Hi, Beth-- Welcome to the group! Looked at your CL ad; your car IS a nice looking example. Not having navigation I see as a bonus on an LS, but lack of heated seats may limit its appeal outside of the south/Sunbelt states. Executive summary: What does Macy's do when they want to get shoes sold? Yes, put 'em on sale/mark it down! This also applies to your car. Why hasn't it sold? Harsh truth: It sounds like the market isn't interested in the car at your asking price, and it sounds like you're getting frustrated. I'm not a dealer (I enjoy cars waaaaaayyyy too much to do the car business for a living), but have some market observations and marketing insights I'll share: Even in the midwest, I haven't seen '98-00 cars selling private party for that kind of money often lately. I've seen two nice ones at dealers in my region in your price range with lower mileage.... and they've been sitting for months. From what I've seen ('01--02 LS430s with comparable miles are currently running anywhere from $2500-5500), you're possibly asking too much if you're wanting to move the car in a reasonable time frame. I've spent too much time lately semi-seriously looking for a '430 or '98-00 LS400 to potentially replace my LS400, so that's why I know far too much about this topic. I'm not sure what you're using as a market pricing guide for your read on the car's value to the market, but cars with money put into getting caught up on maintenance immediately prior to sale rarely get back what you put into them for major maintenance, unless you're turning the wrenches yourself. A good analogy: You've probably heard that when you do a major kitchen or bath remodel in your home, it will only net you a percentage back of what you put into it when it comes time to sell. Depending on region, 50-70% for those things is not an uncommon return on investment... As a long-time Realtor, I tell my clients to do those projects to enjoy the use and utility first and foremost, and for the resale value a distant second... but I digress. Back to your car and private party valuation: When I have sold cars myself, I typically have taken an average of Kelley Blue Book and Edmunds private-party pricing to come up with my asking prices, primarily because it's not easy to lay hands on the dealer's/your banker's NADA Blue Book or whatever industry valuation guide is commonly used there. I've found averaging KBB and Edmunds figures come out surprisingly close to market reality. In my region, KBB calls private party value with your mileage, options, condition, etc., at roughly $4500. Edmunds is usually much harder on used values, calling your car at $3100. Still, that's amazing resale value for a *19* year-old car. Averaging will likely get you closer to a sale at or near your asking price in a reasonably quick length of time. Other marketing ideas? Take *more* and better pictures for your ads, showing all angles of the car, inside and out. Try to use a real camera and not your phone, light things up/use a flash, even in daylight, so shoppers can see the condition of the interior clearly. One other crazy idea? Get the car detailed *very* well and take it to your next area car cruise night, be it for domestic or import metal. Show it off. Seriously. In a major metro area, there's plenty of people who know what your car is, and would recognize the quality and value (well, duh.. it's an LS--they clean up very well... I've taken my '94 to cruise-ins before--it was fun!). That might be a venue to consider if you want to expose it to a potentially more knowledgeable market. Can't hurt, might help. Hope this helps. Good luck! Best, Paul
  32. 1 point
    Ooo. Not fun, and yes, it sounds like there's air trapped there in the throttle body and upper hose connection. I'd start with a pair of locking pliers ("Vise-Grip") on the outside of the filler bolt head and see if you can get it off that way. Once there, fill the cooling system from that opening and that should take care of your air bubble/overheat issues. From what I could look up on Lexus parts sites (the diagrams aren't the easiest to read), so it looks like that filler bolt part number should be 90341-20012, and the washer/gasket below that should be 90430-20017. Hope this helps. Best, Paul
  33. 1 point
    There appears to be a gap in your chronology of events. When you had the vehicle towed, to where was it taken? What was the code that caused the check engine light to illuminate? Did the code indicate a problem with the water pump? A bad water pump would probably not cause the engine to die. Water pumps are often replaced when the timing belt is replaced. Do you have maintenance receipts that would indicate if these services were done? Coolant leakage into the engine is often due to a cylinder head gasket leak. As long as the engine hadn't overheated long enough to damage the cylinder head, the gasket(s) can be replaced at far less cost than an engine rebuild/replacement. Sometimes the size of the coolant leak would determine how prevalent the coolant smell is. A coolant test can be performed to see if combustion gasses are present. First, determine for certain whether you have a head gasket leak. If you don't, what is causing the drop in coolant level. Second, if one or more coils are bad, have them all replaced. If you delay this too long, your catalytic converter may be damaged from unburned fuel.
  34. 1 point
    http://www.lexomans.com/manguide-559.html
  35. 1 point
    Hi David, I'm guessing that your trouble is setting your seat, steering wheel height, and steering wheel column angle. There are 10 settings for the seat alone, In your manual you'll see the forward and backward setting, lumbar support, seat back position, seat cushion up and down. The adjustment for the steering wheel height is the most in need of upward movement. There are a crazy number of adjustments you can set to 'on' or 'off'. Take out your owners manual and sit in the car and have some fun. We love our RX. Paul
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    armcomdes, I haven't had to do this fix on any of our Lexus models , but had two Subaru's that did. The subies was a simple fix because of the shape of the shields, fitting close to the front resonator and covering part of the exhaust pipe as well. I simply put a larger exhaust clamp right around the heat shield at the pipe entering the resonator, and clamped the heat shield right to the resonator. Problem solved for the next 3 years until trade time. The ES muffler shields are different, much wider area coverage, and not as close to the muffler. A down and dirty fix would be to use plumber's strapping (comes in a roll with lots of holes in it. Cut off a section long enough to go between the trunk floor and the heat shield, and then down around the muffler and back up to the strap again. Pull it tight to force the heat shield to collapse onto the muffler, and tighten the ends together with a long bolt and nut. To keep it looking less obvious, position the strapping as far forward on the muffler as possible to do the job, but still not be seen from the rear of the car, if possible. The only other sure way to silence the rattle is a new heat shield and mounting bolts, because yours have rusted off. Good Luck!
  38. 1 point
    I always think heater core. Does the water have a smell?
  39. 1 point
    Guys, You both need to share your disappointment with Lexus USA. Write letters to their complaints departments explaining the issue including several pictures. Be polite, but firm in expressing your disappointment with the lack of concern shown by your dealerships in dealing with the problem. Explain that you both belong to this forum, and hope that you don't have to share your treatment to the forum members, Consumer Reports, the Better Business Bureau in your state, and all of your friends and relatives. You hope that Lexus would reevaluate your issue, as you know of at least one other owner who has the same exact problem. Also state that their response to your issue will help you to decide whether or not you will purchase another Lexus in the future. I can tell you that this has worked for me over the years with GM on a repair for a 77 Corvette, 3 months after the warranty was up. It also worked with Toyota on a used Cressida we purchased. In the GM case they gave us the rear end parts free of charge, and required us to pay the labour charges for the repair. More than fair. As for Toyota, they gave the dealership the parts for free, and paid them to install a new sunroof computer, and this on a four year old used car. I repeat, be firm but fair with them. Tell them that on a vehicle of this age, initial cost, and reputation in the industry, that you would expect that Lexus would want to correct the situation and keep a valued customer. Good Luck, and let us know how it turns out.
  40. 1 point
    EDIT: I live in south Florida and drive a '93 LS400 with the same wet headliner problem. There is nothing you can do to keep water from leaking past the moon-roof. It is designed to pass some water, that's why there is a catch-pan underneath. I wanted to replace the moon-roof gasket and was told by Lexus that the gasket itself was un-replaceable and that a new moon roof (just the glass with gasket) would cost $900. They did NOT say this would "fix" the leaking. I have the factory service manual and I can tell you that removing the headliner and sunroof assembly is not simple. The rear seat has to be removed, side pillar covers, window trim, seat belts all need to be removed in order to remove the headliner, it is at least a whole day, if not 2 day project. UPDATE (03/03/2014): I finally got it nicked. After removing the entire headliner, sunroof & tray assembly I noticed an accumulated layer of fuzzy crud in the bottom of the sunroof drain pan. Apparently this layer was absorbing water and slowing the progress of water trying to drain out of the pan. After cleaning this crud out and cleaning all hoses, drains etc. I replaced the assembly and waited for rain. When it rained I discovered that (arrgh!) Lexus had punched a bunch of holes in the drain pan for rivets, cable-runs, etc. and ALL of these were dripping water. NO WONDER the headliner was wet! A tube of silicone sealed the rivets and I had to unscrew the two cable-run housing assemblies from the drain pan (front, L & R) to goop them up with sealer. Re-assembled and waited for rain (not a long wait in FL). No water leaking from tubes, no water from rivets, housings, etc. and no overflow from drain pan. I can see rainwater flowing out of the drain pan through the drain tubes. My LS400 is again (relatively) watertight!
  41. 1 point
    I think it is pretty cheap when a corporation such as Toyota stops furnishing repair manuals. Once again big corporations don't care about us little people
  42. 1 point
    ...and for posterity sake, exactly which fuse did you replace? Thanks.
  43. 1 point
    how did you deal with the plastic cover? did you remove it completely or did you drill a hole to run the kit's wires through?
  44. 1 point
    This was requested by a member in another thread. Another member responded that this would be difficult to do because everyone uses different products and he is right. But in all honesty there really is a set sequence of steps that are done when you detail properly. There is some variance in product usage, but not in the technique. First of all I'm going to mention several different possibilities of products used for each step. You'll notice that most of these products are professional grade and probably will have to be ordered online. That is because in my experience the consumer products are just that, designed for consumers who don't know or care about having the best finish possible. Professional grade products give the experienced hobbyist and professional detailer greater control over what is being done with the paint. Here are the ESSENTIALS you will NEED these to get started. -Several Microfiber towels, I say 6, 3 small 3 big. I reccomend them from our site www.lexuscarcare.com or www.pakshak.com. MF will be mush less prone to scratch than cotton. -Several 100% cotton bath towels, 3 or so. These will be used folded up to work in swirl removers and polish because they have more "bite" than MF. MF will be used for removal. -Several foam and MF applicators, you can get these where you get the towels. -Eagle one Tire Swipes for spplying dressing to tires -A semi stiff brush for tires and wheel wells -2 nice 5 gallon buckets -Some sort of paint cleaner like Meguiars #9, #82 Swirl Free Polish, 1Z Paint Polishes (which work very well by hand) -Some sort of polish like Meguiars #7, P21S Gloss Enhancing Paintwork Cleanser, #81 Hand Polish from Meguiars. -Some sort of wax. We're following a carnuaba/hybrid system here as thats whats best to use if you're only working by hand. So something like Meguiars #26 Tech Wax paste, P21S, or Meguiars NXT, Poorboys EX or EX-P, Blackfire woul\d work well -Glass cleaner- I reccomend Eagle One's 20/20. -An all purpose cleaner like 1Z Cockpit Premium for the interior plastic and carpeting with a nice soft brush. -Woolite and water dilluted 5:1 for leather -A good tire dressing for the tires and the wheel wells after they are washed. Things that would be NICE: -A Porter Cable dual action polisher with 2 cutting pads, 2 polishing pads, and 1 finishing pad. Its tempting to buy a cheaper buffer from Sears or Pepboys or something but trust me when I tell you, if you want the best and safest results the PC is worth the investment. Cheap buffers (Waxxpro, Craftsman) have weak motors that bog down and cumbersome bonnet type systems that either remove too much or not enough paint. If you're gonna spend the bucks anyways, spend twice as much and get the right tool for the job. -A higher cut compound for real swirl removal with the PC like Meguiars #83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish, Poorboys SSR2, Menzerna Intensive Polish -A Bissel Little Green Clean Machine for cleaning carpeting -Plexus plastic polish for all clear plastic -Clay (ClayMagic or Mothers) First clean the interior. Spray the all purpose cleaner on all plastic parts, agitate with the soft brush and wipe clean, use the woolite on the seats and wipe off with a damp towel. Vacuum the carpets well and spray the cleaner and agitate of needed. Pay attention to the nooks and crannys! Always do the interior first so you dont get dust on clean paint. Now, nextthing to do is wash with a good carwash using a good Microfiber, Chenile or Lanswool mitt. Use two buckets, one with soapy water and one with clean for rinsing the mitt after each pass. Wash in straight lines only, never touch the paint in circles. Wash from the top down then do the wheels last as that is where the most grime is, you don't want to drag that up onto the paint. If its hot rinse each panel after washing it. Dont forget to scrub the wheel wells! Next if you have the clay, clay now. Resoap each panel, clay, rinse until the whole car and the windows are done. Now dry the car using your MF towels, use two towels again in straight lines until the car is dry. Now, dress the wheel wells by spraying the protectant up inside them, then spray the protectant on the tire swipe and do the tires. I always do this before the next steps so it doesn't leave overspray on the car. Now its time to start detailing! If you have moderate to heavy swirls and you have the PC start with it, the DACP and a cutting pad, only work 2'x2' sections at a time. Don't use too much DACP, 3-4 dime sized drops a panel is plenty. Make each section look its best before moving on. Use the PC at high speed (5 or 6) and use random overlapping strokes with moderate pressure until the product almost dissapears. The swirls will come out it just may take time. This stage could take hours so be ready for that but the results are worth it. Work your way around the car, when it stops working as well swap out the pad for a clean cutting pad thats why you have two. If the swirls aren't bad use DACP with a polishing pad instead in the same way. If working by hand fold up one of the terry towels into 8ths, apply the #9 or #82 and work into the paint using moderate pressure. Again work 2x2 sections until almost clean and make each section look its best before moving on. This will not remove all swirls but thats left to later steps to hide. If you used the DACP and a cutting pad then you need to go around with DACP and #9 or #82 and a polishing pad afterwards as DACP and a cutting pad will leave micromarring behind. Next, polishing! If you have the buffer use a clean polishing pad and your polish of choice, use it like the DACP but you don't have to work it as long. If by hand same deal, fold up a terry towel and go to town. Now, stand back and admire the work. The paint should be perfect now, no swirls, smooth as glass, good proper color. This is where you look for areas of problems and do them again until it looks right. Now comes the waxing! You can wax by hand or by PC with the finishing pad. Use straight lines and put down a thin coat. Wait depending on the instructions on the wax then buff off IN STRAIGHT lines with an MF towel. Layer and add coats as you see fit. Don't forget to wax the wheels. Next is windows. Get your 20/20 and some paper towels, and newspaper. Spray the 20/20 on the paper towel until its soaked, then scrub it into the window. Next, wipe clean with the newspaper, inside and out all the way around. You can now wax the windows if you'd like but its not neccisary. Now thats it, you're done, sit back and admire your work. Watch for missed patches of wax and wax stuck in creases and crevices. Congratulations!
  45. 1 point
    wow, up 3 sizes on the width from 215's to 245's and no clearance issues, good to know with that in crease in width on a 20'' wheel I am surpried the handling isn't a dramatic difference by just increasing tire pressure on the stock 215/55-17's from 30psi to 36psi I had a very noticeable handling improvement
  46. 1 point
    her are some helpful wire colors for head unit (thanks DEI) 02 lexus es300 12+ constant blue/yellow 12+ acc gray ground brown illumination + green factory amp on pink/blue all wires above found at factory head unit plug left front spkr +pink -purple right front spkr +light green -blue left rear spkr +black -yellow right rear spkr +red -white all wires above found at factory amp (behind glovebox next to ECM) VSS (speed sense) purple/white found at ECM (behind glovebox next to factory amp)
  47. 1 point
    Pictures of my adapter tray and coin holder. These items came installed from the dealer. I think they are stock on the 07 350. I did not see them listed on the Premium Plus package. You can also see the different ledges and diagonal divider in the adapter tray. This is what my original post was asking about. Why these shapes and sizes? Just getting fancy or is there some reason? Some specific function? Dave
  48. 1 point
    .I had the same problem turned out to be clogged drain holes in the sunroof. here is how to fix get a plastic straw as it fits perfectly into the holes located front right and left corners. incert straw just a little now get weed wacker cord which is thick and feed it through the straw (the straw acts to strighten weed wacker cord) so it can feed through the drain tube althe way to the bottom of the car and it will clean it out. Here is what not to do, do not use compressed air to blow tube clear as it may dislodge the drain tube which then requires taking out the roof liner etc.
  49. 1 point
    Grandpa is correct. i have a 94 just like Wucantstop and the button does not click or stay in and is not supposed to. the "trac off" button works list like the stereo system: push the volume knob in and it will come out back to where it was originally and the stereo will turn on. to add to what grandpa also said, when you first turn the key to "on", the "trac" light should come on in the middle of the speedometer and turn off after a few seconds. this is the system doing a self check. the "trac off" light should also turn on and off at the bottom of the dash when the key is turned to on. if neither of these lights illuminate, you have internal traction control problems just like jakeroux.
  50. 1 point
    Well, this won't be much help, but for what's it's worth, I'm having the same problem on my '92, except the light won’t go off (meaning trac control won't come on). Similar to your problem, my switch does not click or appear to engage. When I asked the dealer about it at a recent visit, they informed me the “Trac Accumulator” (which I gather is the brains behind the system) had gone bad and I needed a new one at a cost of about $800. I passed. Would be curious to know if you find a fix though. Good luck!


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