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  1. 2 points
    It could be a good opportunity if you really want an LS 500 and especially if you plan to keep it a long time. You might be able to negotiate a even lower price based on the vehicle's history. I read recently that there are still a lot of unsold new 2018 LS 500's so the market for them is apparently very soft. Other than its run-flat tires and no spare tire, my main problem with the LS 500 is the shrinking interior which now has a volume within a tenth of a cubic foot of the space of a 2019 Toyota Camry with its optional moonroof. The Camry we rented 6 weeks ago was actually roomier than an LS 500 since the rental Camry didn't have a moonroof. Of course, Toyota/Lexus is too ashamed of it to publish interior volume dimensions for the LS 500 so it's necessary to go elsewhere to find them: https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/lexus/ls/2018/specs/ls-awd-398085 Lexus LS 500 - Passenger Volume (cu. ft.): 99.4 Toyota Camry (with moonroof) - 99.3 cu. ft. per https://www.toyota.com/content/ebrochure/2019/camry_ebrochure.pdf I know the luxury sedan market has shrunk due to the flight to SUV's but I never expected the Lexus LS interior to shrink.
  2. 2 points
    Trevor, Thanks for the info. You were correct, I had not connected the temp sender wire. It is a bugger of a thing to locate and even more difficult to fit the connector when the entire loom is in situ. The sender unit is tucked in behind the plastic spark plug channel. Done now, so everything is fine. Thanks again, Alan.
  3. 2 points
    I discovered this article today, thanks to a member at ClubLexus. I went and made a scan of my copy, thanks to his discovery. I don't suppose it would hurt to post it here:
  4. 2 points
    Thanks for the posting! We always like new information. Paul
  5. 2 points
    Hi Nathan. I apologize for not connecting with you sooner. I am always amazed at the depth of friendship and caring that can be built with someone you have never met nor never knew what they looked like. The LOC is a place where those who enjoy their hobby can find others who like swapping stories with like minded friends. Landar was a great part of the LOC and was a great source of Lexus info and technical help. Thank you for letting us share your journey. Paul
  6. 2 points
    Incredible shots Steve!!. Looks like a wonderful trip.
  7. 2 points
    Hey guys i made a small video on how to replace the plastic coolant tees that get brittle with age and can crack / leak / break / leave you stranded. Its a fairly straight forward process, everything is covered in the video from tools to parts. If you have any questions let me know. Parts needed for this job: (1) Gallon of coolant - PN# 00272-1LLAC-01 (2) Coolant Tees - PN# 87248-60460 Optional, highly recommended parts for this job: (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A220 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A210 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A190 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A180 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A800 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 99556-20155
  8. 2 points
    I have NO connection with this automobile.... just showing others JDM RHD TOYOTA CELSIOR VIP SEDAN V8 LS400 JAPAN IMPORT TEXAS TITLE look: https://easttexas.craigslist.org/cto/6180839156.html
  9. 2 points
    I made the DIY because I couldn't find one specifically for the RX330. Lexus also apparently think no RX330 owner would ever change their own oil because they don't tell you how to locate the oil dilter and drain plug in the owner's manual. I hope others find this useful. Please comment. I have a 2004 RX330 and after 23,000 miles, I've decided I'm going to do minor maintenance myself. You'll need: - 5qts of 5w-30 oil - oil filter (see info below) - drain plug gasket (see info below) - 10mm socket wrench - 14mm socket wrench - oil catch container - oil filter wrench (I used the nylon strap which seems pretty versitile) - either jack stands or ramps - funnel - rags to soak up dripping oil Part numbers: Lexus parts: 90430-12031 - Gasket Oil Drain Plug 90915-YZZD1-01 - Oil Filter - 6 Cylinder Toyota equivalent: 904-3012028 or 3012031 drain plug gasket $1.04 089-2202011 oil filter $4.99 1) Jack up the front of your car on stands or use ramps. The RX330 weighs 3850 lbs so make sure your ramps/stands can handle it. You might be able to get away without raising it if you slide on the floor, but it's tight. 2) Pop your hood and unscrew off the oil cap. I stuck a yellow funnel in mine. Notice the yellow dip stick on the left. 3) Lexus put some cosmetic plastic panels to make the "less car savy" believe the car is a magic transportation pod with no ugly mechanical internals. You'll need to remove two of them to access the filter and drain plug. The orange highlight is the panel that hides the filter, and the purple arrow shows where the panel that hides the drain plug is. 4) Get under the car to look for the drain plug panel (purple arrow in above picture). The panel will look like this. Remove all the 10mm bolts. 5) With the panel removed, the drain plug is revealed. Get a 14mm socket wrench and loosen the bolt. Position your oil catch container and remove the bolt. Lexus engineers did good.. they designed the bolt angle so the oil shoots down instead of to the side. Very nice. Remove the drain plug bolt AND its gasket. If the gasket is not on the bolt, it's probably still stuck to the oil pan. Remove the gasket and discard. 6) As the oil is draining, work on removing the panel to the oil filter (orange). Remove all the 10mm bolts (red arrows). 7) There are two plastic clips (green arrows) also holding this panel on. Using a flathead screwdriver, carefully pry up the center part of the clip just a little. This will loosen the clip and the whole clip can be pulled out. 8) Pull off the panel. The other panels will be overlapped over it, but they flex enough to allow you to remove it. This is what it looks like without the panel. 9) After the oil is done draining, put the new gasket on the bolt and replace the bolt. Tighten the bolt for a good seal but don't over tighten. I don't know the official torque yet. Wipe up the oily bolt. UPDATE: I got the Lexus service info... Torque the drain plug to 33ft-lbs (45Nm, 459 kgf-cm) 10) With the panel off, you can now see the oil filter (orange) and a nice gift from the Lexus engineers: an oil catch (green). Loosen the filter, and residual oil will drip out. The oil catch will guide the dripping oil out the oilpan/drainplug panel so position your oil catch below the catch. 11) On the new filter, dab a layer of fresh oil on the O-ring (the rubber ring around the outer lip of the open end of the filter). Align the threads of the new filter and spin it by hand onto the engine where the old filter was. When it makes contact, tighten by hand another 3/4 turn. Don't over tighten. 12) Wipe up oil drips. For me, even though the catch was there, some oil still dripped all over the exhaust pipe and panels. Wipe this up. 13) Fill the engine with 5w-30 oil, 5 qts. A funnel is helpful here. 14) Replace oil cap. 15) Replace both plastic panels. 16) Shut hood and drive around the block. Park the car on level ground and wait 15 minutes. Check for leaks and oil level. I hope this is helpful to someone. ...
  10. 2 points
    We recently purchased a new 2017, Lexus RX350 and love it. Selling our original, one owner, 1994, LS400, with 88,000 miles. This superior designed and built, Generation 1 Lexus has been faithful to us as we have been faithful to it. We loved it and still love it. Its new owner will be blessed with full maintenance documentation and records from DAY ONE and any responses to any questions regarding its history will leave our hands with full disclosure of only "the truth". We would not hesitate to keep it and insure it with Hagerty Insurance as a "modern classic", BUT we do not have the room. If it should not sell to the right appreciative and discriminating buyer of this superior condition Lexus, we may have to make room! It is in truly excellent condition and will serve its new owner well. An ad is posted with www.ClassicCars.com. Go to the ad directly from Classic Car's front page by entering "979779" in the "cc-" prompt where indicated. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any further questions at woodman486@kc.rr.com.
  11. 1 point
    Did you make sure that the cam and crank sensors are plugged in? When you say " Does not crank " what do you actually mean? Is the engine turning but just will not start? Lastly are there any codes?
  12. 1 point
    Was the valet key stolen when the car was parked where you frequently park it? If not, the thief might not find your car again. You might be able to have the all the keys "deleted" from the vehicle ECU memory and then have the keys you still have programmed back in. The thief would still be able to unlock and gain access to your car but the stolen valet key could not be used to start the engine. If that is not good enough, yes, you can have the service center replace and program new keys but there will be significant expense to change the door and trunk locks and the ignition switch. Insurance may cover much or all of the cost if you have it.
  13. 1 point
    as a NEW member, the FIRST thing you need to do is SEARCH other people's steering problems, this has been covered for years. there are even videos showing you how to fix it.. THEN if you dont understand, ask for help. a 5 cent garden hose washer will fix it (usually). see videos.. 2 screws to remove the covers, then 3 screws to remove the plate and you are looking at it.
  14. 1 point
    ok, I have a 99ls, bought in early 2010, I wrapped my alternator in a clorex bottle and it has been working for 7 years now
  15. 1 point
    I always apply some PTFE tape (plumbers use it for pipe joints) to the sump plug thread....never had a leak on anything ever since. This originally came about when I owned a Land Cruiser and the Toyota dealer asked whether I wanted the soft or hard compound seal for the plug. I foolishly chose the hard compound and leaked like a sieve. Someone suggested removing it and wrapping a couple of turns with PTFE and it worked a treat...nowadays I use it all the time on the 'belt & braces' principle.
  16. 1 point
    That is crazy, the gasket is a crush aluminum washer. Oh well, we will see.
  17. 1 point
    dcfish? Whoa! That's a blast from the past. There have been people looking for you asking about navigation and audio systems. I still drop by this forum once a month or so and sometimes try to help. There's not much in the current Lexus lineup of interest to us. Somebody in Nebraska is driving the 2000 LS400 I sold in 2014 ... wish he would change the name/address associated with the car so Lexus wouldn't contact me about it. My daily driver is still the "Lexus of Minivans" - suits us perfectly for our lifestyle these days. Nice to hear from you!
  18. 1 point
    Thanks Trevor for your answer! I have visited Lexus dealer today to they check vibration. Luckily they had a time to check that out. They check balance (did not find anything). Also they make a wheel rotation. Thats all they did. The vibration is now much much lower. Now it feels more like light tingle what could be felt only on good new freeway asphalt. So I probably will wait little while if this gets worse or may be better. This sounds strange that vinbration was almost fixed by the wheel rotation...
  19. 1 point
    The world of lifting RX vehicles is still pretty small so there aren't exactly any definitive guides but like any other strutted vehicle the same limitations in tire/wheel fitment would apply. The first limitation on my 300 was the rear spring perches because they are squattier than the fronts. Side clearance of the spring perch will limit how tall and wide of a tire you can fit without modification or for a certain offset/spacer. The next limitation for me was rubbing when turned full clock, not acceptable to me and I was able to fit mine with no rubbing. The taller and wider the tire the turning clearance is greatly reduced, its geometry but you can figure it out with a straight edge. Clock the wheels and take a straight edge across the inside sidewalls to the nearest obstruction and you can measure how much taller of a tire will fit without rubbing but leave some cushion. The closest point of the tire should be at the horizontal axis of the tire but make sure you look at fender clearances as well. Just take your time and measure everything until you are absolutely sure your fitment is what you want. You could also likely take it to a custom shop and they should be able to measure or use a jig to tell you what you can and can't fit. I would not recommend bringing the tire tread up past the bottom of the spring perch. If you do and you do not have ample clearances you can easily slash your sidewalls. If you are sticking with stock suspension the steering changes shouldn't be as drastic but just be ready for it to handle differently. I have not had to trim anything for mine and do not have anything rub except when I have 300-400 extra pounds in it and the suspension takes a really hard hit, mostly the rear where the outside tread just catches the lip of the fender. I need a little more travel or slightly stiffer springs in the rear. I think I am also running a larger wheel spacer than necessary (2"). Same thing for the front but don't hit the fender lip unless it is a really really hard suspension hit and I am turning. There is enough travel and clearance in the front if I am going straight over that really hard hit. I do not rub on the inside of the tire when turning but it is the outside front of the tire that hits the fender liner. That is only because it was a cheap aftermarket liner I was in a hurry to get in there to get some protection for my trans cooler before a trip. I had to cut the vents into the plastic and they puckered out into the wheel well so the tire catches them. I need to reinstall it so it fits correctly and likely make a little aluminum plate/grill for the vent slots so that doesn't happen. ***Edit- Brickwall says you have springs and shocks on the rear of yours and not a strut so that makes it a lot easier. You are then pretty much limited by the strut and turning clearance of the front then,
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    http://www.lexomans.com/manguide-559.html
  22. 1 point
    One of your driven devices is freezing up. ie the alternator, power steering pump, air conditioning compressor, or one of the idlers. Before putting belt on spin each to make sure they are free. I would suspect the air conditioning compressor when energized is the culprit.
  23. 1 point
    Hello Everyone, I know IACV has been a huge topic on the forum and I have found various pictures in the RX forum and ES forum on the idle air control valve (IACV) or as others call it the idle speed control valve (ISC). However, I have not found a "step by step" posting to date which definitively shows how to clean this thing so that my car stops giving me idling problems. Symptoms I have had included: - low and rough idling that would cause the car engine to start shaking after starting the car - this eventually got worse to the point that when I start my car, it would not idle unless I gave it gas - idling problems for me tended to occur more often after my engine was warm or had been sitting in the sun I hope these series of postings help you fellow LOC members out there. You've certainly helped me in the past so here's my two cents at this common problem. Additionally, the instructions I give are the way in which I have cleaned it myself. As you go about and attempt this, you may find better ways to do so. Please add and refine my instructions/terminology as needed. I am not a professional. I've only changed my oil, air filters, and conducted minor maintenance previously. The bottom line is that if you have the right tools, you should be able to do this. This discovery/ cleaning took me about 2 hours to do cause I ran into problems and there were major steps left out in previous postings that I’ve encountered read. The next time I do this, I believe I can get this done in about an hour or less. Tools Needed: 1) Tightly fitting Philips Screw Driver 2) Carb cleaner that is O2 sensor safe (I've seen CRC. I used Valvoline Carb Cleaner) 3) Locking Grip Pliers (definitely helped me remove the factory tight screws) 4) Small brush for cleaning 5) Towels for cleaning 6) Pliers (help removed brackets holding the hoses) 7) Latex gloves helps with limit the messiness. * I used the same gasket and did not replace it. No problems found. 1) Remove the hose that comes from the engine/motor that connects to the air intake hoses.( Hose is below in red – we’ll refer to this as Hose A) When you pull back the rubber hose covering, you will see that a metal bracket is holding the hose pretty tightly in place. Use the pliers to clasps the two metal pieces together to loosen the bracket and pull the hose loose. You can also do this by hand if it’s easier for you. 2) Upon removing the hose, you will want to remove the two air intake hoses. Loosen the three screws above in green and remove the hose. Below is a picture of the intake hoses removed. 3)After removing the intake hoses, I opened the lid to the air filter and moved this to the side of the car to create more working room. I believe there are two clips on the right holding the lid in place. Just pop the two clips and move the cover to the side. I also took out the air filter and temporarily moved this to the side. 4)After removing the intake hose, the throttle body/IACV/black electric coil is revealed. At this point, I removed the black electric wire from the black coil. Once the electric wire is removed you can remove the black coil from the IACV by removing the two screws. Note, the screws are factory tight so use a tight fitting screw driver to remove the screws. One of my screws was partially stripped from the dealership’s work, so I had to resort to my locking grip pliers which helped out tremendously. After removing the two screws, the black electric piece pops right off. When the black electrical coil is removed from the IACV, it exposes a small pencil sized metal stud. You will also notice a washer that sits on this stud. Don’t lose this washer. Take it and put it aside so it doesn’t fall off when you continue on in the next steps. 5)Additionally, I removed the hose coming out of the IACV. We’ll call this Hose B. This hose can be removed in the same manner by clamping the bracket and pulling the hose out. You will see that the hose is removed below. Below are pictures of before and after. 6)Here is where the fun begins. I initially attempted to remove the four screws attached to the IACV at this point, but found that after an hour, this would be nearly impossible to remove considering the location of the screws were in an extremely tight spot. The only way I would be able to remove the IACV is to remove right throttle body. Not as tough as it sounds. Three screws need to be removed to accomplish this. Again, be careful when removing the screws. Also you will see I removed another electric plug and I also cut a tie wrap. Once you complete these steps, the throttle body/ IACV comes out pretty easily. Note when you remove the throttle body, there will be one LAST hose connected to the IACV. Be careful when you remove this hose as radiator fluid may spill. Some of my fluid spilled out so I just refilled my coolant after I was done. 7)Below is a picture of the bottom view of the IACV. You now can EASILY remove the four screws connecting the IACV to the throttle body . In the picture below, I have already removed one of the screws. Once the four screws are removed the IACV and throttle body separate. Now you can clean both of them with your carb cleaner, brush, towels, cotton swabs etc…. Picture here is before I the cleaning with all the muck inside Pictures after I cleaned the IACV and throttle body This last picture is the post throttle body cleaning 8) Once you are done cleaning, just put back the throttle body/iacv the same way you took it off, and put everything back in reverse order. Ensure the gasket is in place. Also, ensure you put the washer back on the electric coil. Make sure you place hose A & B back and ensure the electric plugs are back in their original position. Once these things are in place, then it's all about putting the air filter/hoses back and you are good to go. If you have lost any coolant, make sure you refill it to a safe level. After completing this cleaning, my car starts up without any problem and idles as if I just purchased the car brand new. Replacing this at a dealership would have costed me $300-400 easily. Let me know if you have any questions. Cheers (Also, I tried to post these as separate replys, but the software combined all my replies into a single reply and did not keep them separated) *Edited the posting to have the pictures follow step by step in sequential order*
  24. 1 point
    Hi itsdancarl, This is a bit of a long shot, since "chatter" is not clear to me. However, if you have a "clunk" when you go over a slight bump, bumpy roads, or when you are moving fairly slowly and hit the brake, soft or hard, it is possible that your front strut rod bushings are either worn out or have reached the end of their usable life. For the first generation LS400s, this bushing is a pretty thick rubber bushing (about 1") and around 3" in diameter sandwiched between two steel plates with 3 bolt holes around the perimeter, and a single one in the middle. Do not confuse this SRB with a lot of info on this forum with the other, later model SRBs, which will get very confusing in a hurry, since the later models have a different design. To replace the Gen 1 SRB, from the front of the car, at ground level, looking below the bumper, look for a large nut with a threaded bolt end facing forward near each wheel; these are on the two strut control rods which face forward and at a slight angle to the front of the car, and pass through the center of the SRB; the SRB is mounted to the frame with three smaller bolts. The strut rods are designed to help maintain the strut geometry and alignment. To change the SRB on the Gen 1 car, it would help you to first get a good idea of what you are working on, so first loosen up one front wheel, jack up the car and safely support it, then take off the front wheel and identify the steel rod, and its general direction. Once you have the wheel off, look for a steel rod about 3/4" in diameter, roughly but not quite parallel to the ground and angled slightly toward the front center of the car - this is the rod which goes through the bushing. Once you know this, you will have a pretty good idea of where the nut is and can easily locate it from the front of the car. Next, using a properly fitting socket and large ratchet (3/4") drive and a breaker bar (you will need the torque and leverage), loosen this nut. Note that there is another large nut on the other side of the bushing, and that one should not be loosened - doing that will alter your alignment characteristics, so DO NOT tinker with that second large nut. Once the front large nut is loosened, remove the three smaller (12mm or 13mm) bolts securing the SRB to the frame, and the SRB can now be removed. To get the 3 smaller bolts loose you may need to use a smaller socket drive and/or wrenches , since if I remember correctly, one of them is slightly harder to get at than the others, but not extremely so. After these 3 bolts and the front nut are taken off, you should be able to work off the bushing - the whole sandwich assembly should come off as a single unit. Installing the new SRB is simply the reverse of the removal procedure, and you may have to work a bit at getting all the holes aligned to get all the bolts re-installed. Whatever you do, don't get tempted to loosen the large nut at the back of the rod; also, do not tighten the large nut on the strut rod before the 3 bolts are installed and tightened. You should be sure to get the torque specs and use them. Finally, once the 3 bolts are torqued correctly, with the car on the stands, tighten the large nut fairly tight , but not to final torque specs - you will want to do that when the car is on the ground and the bushing is under load. This will prevent the SRB from early failure. Total time to do this (both sides) should take you an hour at the most, if you have the correct tools on hand, and you don't foul things up! Finally, I apologize for not providing the correct tool sizes and more exact instructions, since I did this a few years ago, and exact processes have been forgotten. Will try and clean this info up and post it as a how-to with pictures soon. Good Luck!!
  25. 1 point
    Glad you liked it, Paul! For anyone who is also interested, I speculate that the car featured here is the same LS 400 currently being held at the Toyota USA Auto Museum in California: Even though this car has a plate on it, it has been in photos before with the plate removed, such as this one: The mounting holes are so small, that at the right angle with the right lighting, or with the use of photo editing, it could appear as if they aren't even there (like the photo in the C&D article). Notice how hard it is to see the holes on the ES 250 beside the LS (above). The museum car is also a non-Trac equipped model, just like the one in the article: Sources for photos: http://www.speedhunters.com/2012/05/the-toyota-usa-museumfrom-lexus-to-nascar-more/ http://japanesenostalgiccar.com/the-lexus-ls-400-is-officially-a-japanese-nostalgic-car/ http://www.toyotausamuseum.com/collection/1990_LS400.htm
  26. 1 point
    awesome video you have there, pal
  27. 1 point
  28. 1 point
    Filehorse......All can say is WOW, never thought cleaning the Nylon Seat Belt Webbing would result in a Good-As-New Retracting Seat Belt…… As the video instructed, I extended the belt all the way out then locked it with a clip. I added a small mixture of Lestoil and the Dawn Ultra Platinum to a 5 gallon bucket, filled it ¾ full with very hot water and then let the belt soak for three hours. I pulled the belt from the water, dried it off with a Towel then hit it with some Armor all Multi-Purpose Cleaner. Changed-out the water, added some Downy Ultra Liquid Fabric Softener and refilled with very hot water again. Let the Belt soak for another hour then a thorough rinse and fully dried…… Amazing !! Like the Driver's Door Lock Actuator, I waited way too long.......Thanks Again Filehorse for the TIP.......
  29. 1 point
    You might be able to connect into the back of your mirror without having to go into your overhead console. I have a RX350 so I went into the overhead console. You will have to determine what works best for your model or find out what others did.
  30. 1 point
    My 2000 LX470 with about 160,000 miles lost it's suspension fluid, via leaks through the shocks, accumulator, and rusty lines. LEXUS wanted about $8700 to fully repair....and that did not include a new pump or other leveling switches which were working. I did some research and I just converted to a Toyota 100 land Cruiser type suspension system for about $1,700 installed. The ride is great, but I lost the rise and lower feature of course. There are a few kits on the market, but I choose Strut Master mainly because my mechanic had good luck with them in the past. My kit was $500, and labor to install was $1200, which included a new alignment. The top of the rear shocks are a !Removed! to get off, so my mechanic cut a small hole in the floor above, and patched it after the install, which is hidden under the mats anyway. The kit has 4 shocks and two stronger rear coil springs to simulate the Landcruiser. I highly recommend this conversion as once the hydraulic suspension begins to go, you could spend thousands to repair. The original system has so many parts that can fail so I highly recommend the conversion. My 17 year old LX470 is probally only worth $8,000 now, so I am not concerned about any loss in value from the conversion. And I never have to worry about expensive repairs on the suspension ever again.
  31. 1 point
    People, people, people, I CANT even imagine some one with ONLY one key to their Lexus, your FIRST purchase SHOULD be to buy a second... (cost is no reason to not have one)... IF you cant afford one dont buy the car.... what ever happens is something YOU have already accepted ..... GO and buy a second one today... I hope I never see another post like this one...
  32. 1 point
    Speed sensor is located on the passenger side hub.
  33. 1 point
    check your drive shaft cushions, differential mounts and ALL your rear suspension (and I dont mean to just LOOK at them) prize around on them like they are going 75mph. You might look on club lexus for 98 LS400 severe rear vibration https://www.clublexus.com/forums/ls-1st-and-2nd-gen-1990-2000/484366-98-ls400-severe-rear-vibration.html
  34. 1 point
    Thanks so much for your reply, CELSI0R. The car was already fixed. The top picture with the "wow" is how the car looks after the repair. Only thing under the hood that needed replaced was the radiator. Everybody that saw this car loved this model and color, but suggested that $5000 would be too high, considering the damage and what need to be fixed. I am thinking of just selling it for $4000. This 14 year old car has $116k miles. It's got leather heated seats in extremely good condition (never had kids or animals in this car). There are wood trims on doors and front area and steering wheel. Rear spoiler. Basically, this car looks perfect, but it's the basic car maintenance repairs that need to be done and I don't want to deal with them at this point since I have the new car. I got the new RC F, which I'm extremely excited about, and I just need this GS off my property ASAP. I haven't posted the ad on Craigslist yet and I already have two guys wanting to buy it this weekend. I think I'll have them go through bidding war amongst each other. 🤣
  35. 1 point
    Lexus has received new J D Power awards, but is now struggling to get back its former top ratings. Industry followers say it's not that Lexus quality has slipped, its that the other car makers are getting a whole lot better. Read the article below. Paul https://lexusenthusiast.com/2017/06/22/lexus-gs-among-the-best-in-2017-j-d-power-initial-quality-study-while-overall-bran
  36. 1 point
    I also own a white 2008 Lexus GX 470 that has paint chipping on two sides of the car. Has anyone had luck with Lexus addressing the issue? It seems so many people have had chipping on the white GX 470.
  37. 1 point
  38. 1 point
    Well, I strongly doubt your problem is your speakers. Many Lexus cars have more miles than yours and have good, working speakers. With your speaker net work just failing at random it has to be something in the head unit or amplifier. Don't put any more money into speakers. Check with you local Lexus dealer and see if they can at least diagnosis the problem and what it will cost. The sub speaker is 8" inches, and the door speakers are 41/2" inches. The exact size of each speaker can change from model year, and interior lay out. If your IS has the small round tweeter on the top of the door, are 1"inch . Paul
  39. 1 point
    Hello, my name is Gary M. Sigler, joined today, 5-6-17. I just bought a new 2016 GS F.
  40. 1 point
    my 99LS turned over 200k in January and I replaced all recommended items and it is like new again. quiet and peppy....
  41. 1 point
    Yeah the Y-pipe is a common problem, water and whatever else gets trapped inside the shielding and rusts it out. Same thing happened to mine. It would be better to remove the shielding altogether.
  42. 1 point
    Hopefully you can get some benefit from the attached files. Good luck. RX300_1998-2003_Workshop_Repair_Manual__WhereEverybodyKnowsY.pdf RX300 - Body Electrical Diagrams .pdf RX300_-_Repair_Manual_.pdf
  43. 1 point
    EDIT: I live in south Florida and drive a '93 LS400 with the same wet headliner problem. There is nothing you can do to keep water from leaking past the moon-roof. It is designed to pass some water, that's why there is a catch-pan underneath. I wanted to replace the moon-roof gasket and was told by Lexus that the gasket itself was un-replaceable and that a new moon roof (just the glass with gasket) would cost $900. They did NOT say this would "fix" the leaking. I have the factory service manual and I can tell you that removing the headliner and sunroof assembly is not simple. The rear seat has to be removed, side pillar covers, window trim, seat belts all need to be removed in order to remove the headliner, it is at least a whole day, if not 2 day project. UPDATE (03/03/2014): I finally got it nicked. After removing the entire headliner, sunroof & tray assembly I noticed an accumulated layer of fuzzy crud in the bottom of the sunroof drain pan. Apparently this layer was absorbing water and slowing the progress of water trying to drain out of the pan. After cleaning this crud out and cleaning all hoses, drains etc. I replaced the assembly and waited for rain. When it rained I discovered that (arrgh!) Lexus had punched a bunch of holes in the drain pan for rivets, cable-runs, etc. and ALL of these were dripping water. NO WONDER the headliner was wet! A tube of silicone sealed the rivets and I had to unscrew the two cable-run housing assemblies from the drain pan (front, L & R) to goop them up with sealer. Re-assembled and waited for rain (not a long wait in FL). No water leaking from tubes, no water from rivets, housings, etc. and no overflow from drain pan. I can see rainwater flowing out of the drain pan through the drain tubes. My LS400 is again (relatively) watertight!
  44. 1 point
    ...and for posterity sake, exactly which fuse did you replace? Thanks.
  45. 1 point
    how did you deal with the plastic cover? did you remove it completely or did you drill a hole to run the kit's wires through?
  46. 1 point
    This was requested by a member in another thread. Another member responded that this would be difficult to do because everyone uses different products and he is right. But in all honesty there really is a set sequence of steps that are done when you detail properly. There is some variance in product usage, but not in the technique. First of all I'm going to mention several different possibilities of products used for each step. You'll notice that most of these products are professional grade and probably will have to be ordered online. That is because in my experience the consumer products are just that, designed for consumers who don't know or care about having the best finish possible. Professional grade products give the experienced hobbyist and professional detailer greater control over what is being done with the paint. Here are the ESSENTIALS you will NEED these to get started. -Several Microfiber towels, I say 6, 3 small 3 big. I reccomend them from our site www.lexuscarcare.com or www.pakshak.com. MF will be mush less prone to scratch than cotton. -Several 100% cotton bath towels, 3 or so. These will be used folded up to work in swirl removers and polish because they have more "bite" than MF. MF will be used for removal. -Several foam and MF applicators, you can get these where you get the towels. -Eagle one Tire Swipes for spplying dressing to tires -A semi stiff brush for tires and wheel wells -2 nice 5 gallon buckets -Some sort of paint cleaner like Meguiars #9, #82 Swirl Free Polish, 1Z Paint Polishes (which work very well by hand) -Some sort of polish like Meguiars #7, P21S Gloss Enhancing Paintwork Cleanser, #81 Hand Polish from Meguiars. -Some sort of wax. We're following a carnuaba/hybrid system here as thats whats best to use if you're only working by hand. So something like Meguiars #26 Tech Wax paste, P21S, or Meguiars NXT, Poorboys EX or EX-P, Blackfire woul\d work well -Glass cleaner- I reccomend Eagle One's 20/20. -An all purpose cleaner like 1Z Cockpit Premium for the interior plastic and carpeting with a nice soft brush. -Woolite and water dilluted 5:1 for leather -A good tire dressing for the tires and the wheel wells after they are washed. Things that would be NICE: -A Porter Cable dual action polisher with 2 cutting pads, 2 polishing pads, and 1 finishing pad. Its tempting to buy a cheaper buffer from Sears or Pepboys or something but trust me when I tell you, if you want the best and safest results the PC is worth the investment. Cheap buffers (Waxxpro, Craftsman) have weak motors that bog down and cumbersome bonnet type systems that either remove too much or not enough paint. If you're gonna spend the bucks anyways, spend twice as much and get the right tool for the job. -A higher cut compound for real swirl removal with the PC like Meguiars #83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish, Poorboys SSR2, Menzerna Intensive Polish -A Bissel Little Green Clean Machine for cleaning carpeting -Plexus plastic polish for all clear plastic -Clay (ClayMagic or Mothers) First clean the interior. Spray the all purpose cleaner on all plastic parts, agitate with the soft brush and wipe clean, use the woolite on the seats and wipe off with a damp towel. Vacuum the carpets well and spray the cleaner and agitate of needed. Pay attention to the nooks and crannys! Always do the interior first so you dont get dust on clean paint. Now, nextthing to do is wash with a good carwash using a good Microfiber, Chenile or Lanswool mitt. Use two buckets, one with soapy water and one with clean for rinsing the mitt after each pass. Wash in straight lines only, never touch the paint in circles. Wash from the top down then do the wheels last as that is where the most grime is, you don't want to drag that up onto the paint. If its hot rinse each panel after washing it. Dont forget to scrub the wheel wells! Next if you have the clay, clay now. Resoap each panel, clay, rinse until the whole car and the windows are done. Now dry the car using your MF towels, use two towels again in straight lines until the car is dry. Now, dress the wheel wells by spraying the protectant up inside them, then spray the protectant on the tire swipe and do the tires. I always do this before the next steps so it doesn't leave overspray on the car. Now its time to start detailing! If you have moderate to heavy swirls and you have the PC start with it, the DACP and a cutting pad, only work 2'x2' sections at a time. Don't use too much DACP, 3-4 dime sized drops a panel is plenty. Make each section look its best before moving on. Use the PC at high speed (5 or 6) and use random overlapping strokes with moderate pressure until the product almost dissapears. The swirls will come out it just may take time. This stage could take hours so be ready for that but the results are worth it. Work your way around the car, when it stops working as well swap out the pad for a clean cutting pad thats why you have two. If the swirls aren't bad use DACP with a polishing pad instead in the same way. If working by hand fold up one of the terry towels into 8ths, apply the #9 or #82 and work into the paint using moderate pressure. Again work 2x2 sections until almost clean and make each section look its best before moving on. This will not remove all swirls but thats left to later steps to hide. If you used the DACP and a cutting pad then you need to go around with DACP and #9 or #82 and a polishing pad afterwards as DACP and a cutting pad will leave micromarring behind. Next, polishing! If you have the buffer use a clean polishing pad and your polish of choice, use it like the DACP but you don't have to work it as long. If by hand same deal, fold up a terry towel and go to town. Now, stand back and admire the work. The paint should be perfect now, no swirls, smooth as glass, good proper color. This is where you look for areas of problems and do them again until it looks right. Now comes the waxing! You can wax by hand or by PC with the finishing pad. Use straight lines and put down a thin coat. Wait depending on the instructions on the wax then buff off IN STRAIGHT lines with an MF towel. Layer and add coats as you see fit. Don't forget to wax the wheels. Next is windows. Get your 20/20 and some paper towels, and newspaper. Spray the 20/20 on the paper towel until its soaked, then scrub it into the window. Next, wipe clean with the newspaper, inside and out all the way around. You can now wax the windows if you'd like but its not neccisary. Now thats it, you're done, sit back and admire your work. Watch for missed patches of wax and wax stuck in creases and crevices. Congratulations!
  47. 1 point
    2006 ES330 Certified pre-owned $24000.00 roughly insurance? I don't now how much? repairs? Where do I begin! I've had several Lexus cars over the years. What I truly USED to like was the fact I could simply trust the dealer shop, and generally, the shop was never necessary anyway! All that changed with the ES330. So why did I move to the 330 from LS models? Well....downsizing is one answer, and besides I liked the styling of the ES over the LS at that time. We had always had such great results wth pre-owned (well, twice before this one) and the service was...wonderful! The ES has turned out to be one of the worst quality cars I have ever owned. And I've even owned Chevrolet so that should set the standard? The car has numerous rattles inside the cockpit. Not all from the same place, not consistent from any one place, but always somewhere, there is a rattle! The transmission hunts for the gear it likes at various times.....disconcerting to say the least. Heat register coves pop off routinely. We put the back in place, a few weeks later they pop off again. The windshield wiper that senses rain? ^&*&$##* !!! It seems to randomly decide when, and if, it wants the windshield cleared. Often times, just pulling into the garage from a rainless night, it decides to clean the windows? Honestly, it's dangerous at times! Now....the service. Well, I suspect this is simply a case of getting too big and not being able to keep up, or assumning all Lexus owners don't really care what it costs? I was informed the front end needed rebuilding. Loose, worn ball joints, etc. I got the quote from them......went to another shop I've done a lot with in the past and they looked, agreed the parts could be replaced, and quoted about half the price. I had them do it of course. For the next several visits to Lexus, I was informed the front end was getting worse? On the third visit, I advised the service rep. that I had already had the parts replaced at another venue. No apology.....no explaination either. I was just informed the stearing hoses are leaking and need replacing......64,000 miles? I guess I don't expect that from Lexus. New brakes were needed at 35,000 miles......again sort of a surprise! If these things really are wearing that fast, maybe I don't need to consider Lexus for the future. Maybe I'm just a bit miffed at this point because I though what one bought with a Lexus was quality, and assurance of a non-hassle interaction with the company. What do you think Lexus? David
  48. 1 point
    wow, up 3 sizes on the width from 215's to 245's and no clearance issues, good to know with that in crease in width on a 20'' wheel I am surpried the handling isn't a dramatic difference by just increasing tire pressure on the stock 215/55-17's from 30psi to 36psi I had a very noticeable handling improvement
  49. 1 point
    A bunch of LX engines prior to 02 had the exhaust manifold problem. It tends to crack in an area that is not easily seen, and it gets worse with age. Lexus replaced the ones that went bad during the warranty period. The replacements do not seem to have the problem. If you find a used one, be wary - it may have the same inherent weakness. Ordering the replacements should give you the updated parts - whether from Toyota or Lexus. If you know of a good mechanic, they can replace the manifolds. I just would not get a used part for fear of getting one of the faulty ones.
  50. 1 point
    No problem, That's one of the reasons were here, Happy to hear that all is well in your garage


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