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  1. 2 points
    It could be a good opportunity if you really want an LS 500 and especially if you plan to keep it a long time. You might be able to negotiate a even lower price based on the vehicle's history. I read recently that there are still a lot of unsold new 2018 LS 500's so the market for them is apparently very soft. Other than its run-flat tires and no spare tire, my main problem with the LS 500 is the shrinking interior which now has a volume within a tenth of a cubic foot of the space of a 2019 Toyota Camry with its optional moonroof. The Camry we rented 6 weeks ago was actually roomier than an LS 500 since the rental Camry didn't have a moonroof. Of course, Toyota/Lexus is too ashamed of it to publish interior volume dimensions for the LS 500 so it's necessary to go elsewhere to find them: https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/lexus/ls/2018/specs/ls-awd-398085 Lexus LS 500 - Passenger Volume (cu. ft.): 99.4 Toyota Camry (with moonroof) - 99.3 cu. ft. per https://www.toyota.com/content/ebrochure/2019/camry_ebrochure.pdf I know the luxury sedan market has shrunk due to the flight to SUV's but I never expected the Lexus LS interior to shrink.
  2. 2 points
    Trevor, Thanks for the info. You were correct, I had not connected the temp sender wire. It is a bugger of a thing to locate and even more difficult to fit the connector when the entire loom is in situ. The sender unit is tucked in behind the plastic spark plug channel. Done now, so everything is fine. Thanks again, Alan.
  3. 2 points
    I discovered this article today, thanks to a member at ClubLexus. I went and made a scan of my copy, thanks to his discovery. I don't suppose it would hurt to post it here:
  4. 2 points
    Thanks for the posting! We always like new information. Paul
  5. 2 points
    Hi Nathan. I apologize for not connecting with you sooner. I am always amazed at the depth of friendship and caring that can be built with someone you have never met nor never knew what they looked like. The LOC is a place where those who enjoy their hobby can find others who like swapping stories with like minded friends. Landar was a great part of the LOC and was a great source of Lexus info and technical help. Thank you for letting us share your journey. Paul
  6. 2 points
    Incredible shots Steve!!. Looks like a wonderful trip.
  7. 2 points
    Hey guys i made a small video on how to replace the plastic coolant tees that get brittle with age and can crack / leak / break / leave you stranded. Its a fairly straight forward process, everything is covered in the video from tools to parts. If you have any questions let me know. Parts needed for this job: (1) Gallon of coolant - PN# 00272-1LLAC-01 (2) Coolant Tees - PN# 87248-60460 Optional, highly recommended parts for this job: (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A220 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A210 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A190 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A180 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A800 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 99556-20155
  8. 2 points
    I have NO connection with this automobile.... just showing others JDM RHD TOYOTA CELSIOR VIP SEDAN V8 LS400 JAPAN IMPORT TEXAS TITLE look: https://easttexas.craigslist.org/cto/6180839156.html
  9. 2 points
    I made the DIY because I couldn't find one specifically for the RX330. Lexus also apparently think no RX330 owner would ever change their own oil because they don't tell you how to locate the oil dilter and drain plug in the owner's manual. I hope others find this useful. Please comment. I have a 2004 RX330 and after 23,000 miles, I've decided I'm going to do minor maintenance myself. You'll need: - 5qts of 5w-30 oil - oil filter (see info below) - drain plug gasket (see info below) - 10mm socket wrench - 14mm socket wrench - oil catch container - oil filter wrench (I used the nylon strap which seems pretty versitile) - either jack stands or ramps - funnel - rags to soak up dripping oil Part numbers: Lexus parts: 90430-12031 - Gasket Oil Drain Plug 90915-YZZD1-01 - Oil Filter - 6 Cylinder Toyota equivalent: 904-3012028 or 3012031 drain plug gasket $1.04 089-2202011 oil filter $4.99 1) Jack up the front of your car on stands or use ramps. The RX330 weighs 3850 lbs so make sure your ramps/stands can handle it. You might be able to get away without raising it if you slide on the floor, but it's tight. 2) Pop your hood and unscrew off the oil cap. I stuck a yellow funnel in mine. Notice the yellow dip stick on the left. 3) Lexus put some cosmetic plastic panels to make the "less car savy" believe the car is a magic transportation pod with no ugly mechanical internals. You'll need to remove two of them to access the filter and drain plug. The orange highlight is the panel that hides the filter, and the purple arrow shows where the panel that hides the drain plug is. 4) Get under the car to look for the drain plug panel (purple arrow in above picture). The panel will look like this. Remove all the 10mm bolts. 5) With the panel removed, the drain plug is revealed. Get a 14mm socket wrench and loosen the bolt. Position your oil catch container and remove the bolt. Lexus engineers did good.. they designed the bolt angle so the oil shoots down instead of to the side. Very nice. Remove the drain plug bolt AND its gasket. If the gasket is not on the bolt, it's probably still stuck to the oil pan. Remove the gasket and discard. 6) As the oil is draining, work on removing the panel to the oil filter (orange). Remove all the 10mm bolts (red arrows). 7) There are two plastic clips (green arrows) also holding this panel on. Using a flathead screwdriver, carefully pry up the center part of the clip just a little. This will loosen the clip and the whole clip can be pulled out. 8) Pull off the panel. The other panels will be overlapped over it, but they flex enough to allow you to remove it. This is what it looks like without the panel. 9) After the oil is done draining, put the new gasket on the bolt and replace the bolt. Tighten the bolt for a good seal but don't over tighten. I don't know the official torque yet. Wipe up the oily bolt. UPDATE: I got the Lexus service info... Torque the drain plug to 33ft-lbs (45Nm, 459 kgf-cm) 10) With the panel off, you can now see the oil filter (orange) and a nice gift from the Lexus engineers: an oil catch (green). Loosen the filter, and residual oil will drip out. The oil catch will guide the dripping oil out the oilpan/drainplug panel so position your oil catch below the catch. 11) On the new filter, dab a layer of fresh oil on the O-ring (the rubber ring around the outer lip of the open end of the filter). Align the threads of the new filter and spin it by hand onto the engine where the old filter was. When it makes contact, tighten by hand another 3/4 turn. Don't over tighten. 12) Wipe up oil drips. For me, even though the catch was there, some oil still dripped all over the exhaust pipe and panels. Wipe this up. 13) Fill the engine with 5w-30 oil, 5 qts. A funnel is helpful here. 14) Replace oil cap. 15) Replace both plastic panels. 16) Shut hood and drive around the block. Park the car on level ground and wait 15 minutes. Check for leaks and oil level. I hope this is helpful to someone. ...
  10. 2 points
    We recently purchased a new 2017, Lexus RX350 and love it. Selling our original, one owner, 1994, LS400, with 88,000 miles. This superior designed and built, Generation 1 Lexus has been faithful to us as we have been faithful to it. We loved it and still love it. Its new owner will be blessed with full maintenance documentation and records from DAY ONE and any responses to any questions regarding its history will leave our hands with full disclosure of only "the truth". We would not hesitate to keep it and insure it with Hagerty Insurance as a "modern classic", BUT we do not have the room. If it should not sell to the right appreciative and discriminating buyer of this superior condition Lexus, we may have to make room! It is in truly excellent condition and will serve its new owner well. An ad is posted with www.ClassicCars.com. Go to the ad directly from Classic Car's front page by entering "979779" in the "cc-" prompt where indicated. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any further questions at woodman486@kc.rr.com.
  11. 2 points
  12. 1 point
    All prices are local. See what similar cars are selling for in your area. KBB private party sale value where I live in the Midwest for a 2001 LS UL in that color with that mileage in Good condition is between $4,916 and $7,245 which I think is unrealistically high. A 2006 LS UL with similar miles in a more desirable color with the optional PCS/DRCC package could bring $10K to $13K here if it is in KBB Good condition. It's a shame these cars aren't worth more but there isn't much demand for old Lexus sedans - even originally expensive ones.
  13. 1 point
    I had a 1996, 2004, 2006 and now 2015.... there is no way that beating you to death is normal. If all the mechahicals are good then that leaves the tires. Trust me on the tires, get Michelin it you want a good ride. You get what you pay for and the other brands WILL impact ride quality.
  14. 1 point
    Was the valet key stolen when the car was parked where you frequently park it? If not, the thief might not find your car again. You might be able to have the all the keys "deleted" from the vehicle ECU memory and then have the keys you still have programmed back in. The thief would still be able to unlock and gain access to your car but the stolen valet key could not be used to start the engine. If that is not good enough, yes, you can have the service center replace and program new keys but there will be significant expense to change the door and trunk locks and the ignition switch. Insurance may cover much or all of the cost if you have it.
  15. 1 point
    The service consultant called and stated they got approval to replace both door actuators, which they had in stock, and he is finishing up the paperwork. I asked if I was going to have a problem with the rear and he said "they don't get cycled as much as the front." I told him I guess we will jump off that bridge if we get to it and he laughed. The Lexus gods were good to me.
  16. 1 point
    The rx400h has rear struts, the 450h has the spring and shocks
  17. 1 point
    I will put an end to this mystery..... these are the trim finish panels that fit the "hole" in all 4 doors, you cant see them, but your fingers feel them when you use the opening to close the door.... they seem to fit 95-2000
  18. 1 point
    Hey all! First post here, so I accidentally purchased this incredible 1998 LS 400 with 54K original miles. This isn't exactly a for sale ad, as I'm sure you'd all be happy to take a look at my new car - HOWEVER, the purchase was technically a mistake... Seeing as this was purchased sight unseen - I'm pretty happy with it's incredible condition! It is a California car, now in North Jersey and the timing belt was done at 48K miles.
  19. 1 point
    I just purchased a white and beige interior 1996 Lexus LS 400 that belonged to an old lady that never drove it practically. The car was purchased with 9,547 original miles. It is still under 10,000 miles The car looks like it just came out from dealership and still smells new
  20. 1 point
    I had this same issue with my'95 SC400 a couple years ago. The 'bar' mentioned by the dealer is no more than a short metal rod and used ones can usually be found on eBay for a few bucks. Be certain you are buying the one for your year and model, as there are several types. The attachment clips are plastic and can also be purchased new from Toyota or on eBay for a few bucks each. Any competent mechanic should be able to do this repair - dealer not required. The driver side door lock linkage is different from the right side but the clips are universal. The hardest part of the job is removing and replacing the door panel but YouTube videos are available on how-to. BTW, this is a very common problem with Toyotas and Lexus because of (guess what) that aging of that plastic clip which eventually becomes brittle and breaks. I cannot imagine why Toyota didn't use a metal clip as they did in the good old days. I suppose the answer to that is a guaranteed $500 repair somewhere down the line.
  21. 1 point
    Just bought a beautiful 2015 LX 350. What’s the best option for mats—Lexus, weathertec, other? Want aesthetic and protection.
  22. 1 point
    One of your driven devices is freezing up. ie the alternator, power steering pump, air conditioning compressor, or one of the idlers. Before putting belt on spin each to make sure they are free. I would suspect the air conditioning compressor when energized is the culprit.
  23. 1 point
    Here is a new photo array of the new LF -1 Crossover which will apparently replace the RX. What I noticed was the selection of power plants that will be available. Gas, fuel cells?, all electric, and hybred. Paul https://lexusenthusiast.com/2018/01/15/introducing-the-lexus-lf-1-limitless-flagship-crossover-concept/
  24. 1 point
    Thanks guys! I got it posted. It is the SC from that post.
  25. 1 point
    Still here and added a Toyota Solara convertible to my collection. Love this SC look alike. Yup Still have RX400h with 209k miles...what a ride. Still a hot rod.
  26. 1 point
    Sorry forgot to attach the photo of the timing belt record sticker, its difficult to read Overrunning of the alternator pulley is highly unlikely since i installed a brand new alternator which came with the pulley
  27. 1 point
    Search Mirrortap (works very well) on ebay and then do a search on this site and other Lexus forums that have covered this in several threads. You can tap into a connector in the overhead console. The threads will explain how to remove the overhead console. You will have to find out, or test for, which hot wire is switched and which wire to use as a ground.
  28. 1 point
    Ignition caps and rotors (and wires) are a bit of a pain to do after the TB job, but not impossible. The biggest hassle is getting to the bolts that hold the plastics on at the front side of the engine. For the wheel locks, look in the tool kit inside the trunk. It has its own spot for it with the tool kit. If you have the owners manual set, look through for wheel lock info. McGard in NY State still makes replacement wheel lock keys if you have the key code, and you can order one from them. Maybe consider a second one to keep with your tools at home and as a back up--they're inexpensive. Otherwise, the one time I had to get the wheel lock off without they key, I hammered a large socket (7/8"?) over the whole tapered lug nut, then was able to remove with a 1/2" breaker bar. Stock headlights on the early cars are pretty horrid. A lot of it has to do with the stock bulb 9004 fitment ('93-94 cars went to an 9003/H4). The rest of it has to do with the optics of the headlight, itself. I switched to a set of clear-style headlights made by Eagle Eyes (bought them a few years back online); H4 lamp (you'll need to convert or adapt your connector), good optics, giving off a decent impression of a proper E-code beam pattern. '93-'94 cars have slightly better stock headlights, and might be worth trying out if you can get them cheaply enough in the junkyard. For the rest of your electrical maladies, if there's an electrical section in your shop manuals, start there.
  29. 1 point
    The belt can go easily to 125k miles, but 90k is the mark. Totally agree have the water pump and idlers replaced. The normal place to find replacement is a sticker on the front cam cover facing the top so you can see it. If no sticker, than it may not have been done. YOu can also set up a account with Vin # on MYLEXUS. Sometimes there are maintenance entries if they had service done at LEXUS dealership.
  30. 1 point
    check your drive shaft cushions, differential mounts and ALL your rear suspension (and I dont mean to just LOOK at them) prize around on them like they are going 75mph. You might look on club lexus for 98 LS400 severe rear vibration https://www.clublexus.com/forums/ls-1st-and-2nd-gen-1990-2000/484366-98-ls400-severe-rear-vibration.html
  31. 1 point
    Hi John and welcome! We have a 2016 RX and have about 6500 miles on it. We love the crossover size and the interior is way cool. Even the mpg is not bad. On interstate driving we've gotten close to 30 mpg. I've had 3. ES350's and you defiantly do not get the smooth and quiiiet ride of the ES. I have found that over time, I have adjusted to the bumps and stiffer suspension. By the way, the RX350 is the best selling car that Lexus product.
  32. 1 point
    Man I know how you feel. That is about the same way I felt too. That is exactly why I purchased the Porsche. I told my wife I wasn't getting rid of one toy without getting another one.
  33. 1 point
    After drinking my complimentary coffee. I asked the parts department lady if I can discuss the car with the techs. she says "sure, go out to talk to them" . one old schooler is in the car, with the diagnostics machine. running codes. with two lads looking on. i tell them about when it failed. and asked if it was a fault with the rear sensors? like water might have gotten into it? we took it over to the pit. where the problem was found. the lad in the pit held the sensor in "low", so the car would raise, then put it back on the lift to assess the damage. One of the brackets for the height sensor had clean snapped off. causing it to always think it was up. when in fact it was down. they sell the whole assembly (including suspension arm, actuator arm,sensor) for $500. i asked, can't we just tack this on with a MIG welder? lads agreed. $0 or $500. haha, they get paid hourly. and the consultation is free. so they were happy to explore the mysteries of the LS400/Celsior air suspension. tacking the bracket back on. but what caused it to snap? making the whole rear of the car fail? These actuator arms. both Left and Right had seized up. at both ends. not only causing the sensors to act up. but placing tension on the brackets because they have no movement. But why would i want to pay $1,000 for a whole kit (left and right), when it's just these 9.5cm rods with ball joints on the end,6mm thread, and 10mm nuts? when i could buy these adjustable ones...... fully adjustable links from the headlight assembly in the later Gen Celsiors/LS400's. strong enough for the load bearing needed. and fully adjustable to set the sensor height at whatever height i choose? (drop 2 inches) meaning i can run stock setup at a custom height? no brainer. @ $30 a piece. And for all their help? i didn't pay a cent. Big thanks to the lads at the Toyota Dealership. and the parts lady. they were patient. adventurous. and let me get involved. a fun time was had. - they understand that some parts i will buy used, or aftermarket. and some new parts from them . Excellent people. Thumbs up Toyota, you guys are awesome.
  34. 1 point
    Well, I strongly doubt your problem is your speakers. Many Lexus cars have more miles than yours and have good, working speakers. With your speaker net work just failing at random it has to be something in the head unit or amplifier. Don't put any more money into speakers. Check with you local Lexus dealer and see if they can at least diagnosis the problem and what it will cost. The sub speaker is 8" inches, and the door speakers are 41/2" inches. The exact size of each speaker can change from model year, and interior lay out. If your IS has the small round tweeter on the top of the door, are 1"inch . Paul
  35. 1 point
    This past weekend, I changed some suspension components. My car is a 1999 LS400. I changed out the shocks (utilizing 'quick struts'), upper control arms, strut bars, sway bar end links, and sway bar bushings. I also bought outer tie rod ends and lower ball joints; however, I did not install those because (frankly) I was really tired by the time I had installed everything else. I'll get to them later. The current lower ball joints and outer tie rod ends were replaced about 45k miles ago, so they shouldn't be terribly bad. The boots on both are in tact. Oh yes... Almost forgot, I got new pads, rotors, and gave it fresh brake fluid (which it desperately needed). Braking is significantly improved, and with the new shocks up front, it doesn't dive nearly as much as it used to. For the strut rods, I used Toyota OEM. I intended on getting just the bushings; however, South Atlanta Lexus stated the bushings were discontinued, so I had to spend a little more for the full bars. For the sway bar end links, sway bar bushings, and upper control arm, I bought Moog components. Fingers are crossed as to how long they last, but the price differential between OEM and Moog was too much for me to pass up, especially the upper control arms. All the components fit perfectly, as the OEM did. Just a note on the shocks. They work well, much better than the OEM units that were on there (with 195k miles). I went with Unity Shocks, where I purchased the whole assembly, getting new shock mounts, rubber bushings, spring, and the shock itself. It comes assembled, ready to install. You will want to make sure the center nut is on tight. One of mine was a little loose. I'm also waiting to see what the company does regarding the rear struts. They sent me struts that don't fit inside the wheel well without taking the control arm out. The difference between the ride at the front and the ride at the rear is noticeable now, and I'm looking forward to changing out the rear struts as soon as possible. Purists will deride the fact that I did not use KYB shocks; however, I didn't have spring compressors, and I wanted new shock mounts. If the shocks last 40,000 miles, I will be happy. I did run into a snag that I wanted to make sure people were aware of. When you install new strut bars at the front, make DOUBLY sure that the camber bolt plates are snug between the tabs. I failed to make sure, and then put 120 some odd pound feet of torque on the nut, which then slowly spun the bolt, mashing the tabs flat. Thus, I can't get an alignment on my front passenger side now. I have an appointment to get this fixed, but I mention this just as a caution to others. I was tired, and ready to be done with the project, especially spending loads of time trying to get the incorrect rear shocks installed (insert face palm slap...). Interestingly, the alignment shop said the alignment isn't that far off in spite of my mistake, so that's good. Now - I need to fix what I think is an exhaust leak. My LS is sounding a bit "sporty".
  36. 1 point
    yeah, changed them. like night and day. only at a cost of $100 had an indicator fail before roadworthy testing. must be an earthing issue. as others have found. the only issues with these cars is maintenance.
  37. 1 point
    I was hoping that with all of the complaints Lexus would have stepped up and done what was right and fix the problem. It seems to be all the paint with a pearl finish appear to have this problem. I bought the GX470 brand new shipped from Japan. And I took great care of it, hand cleaned mostly and waxed at least twice a year, but always kept clean. It really *BLEEP*es me off to see the paint peel like it did. I had it painted and now I see I'll have to have the rims done also, as there starting to peel. Good Luck to all of you and if there are any changes with Lexus , let the group know.
  38. 1 point
  39. 1 point
    Attached is info from the RX400h repair manual. Start with the switch. SeatHeaterSwitch.pdf SeatHeaterParts.pdf SeatHeaterDiagram.pdf SeatHeaterControlLH.pdf
  40. 1 point
    Good point, Micah. I guess I view the TB/WP as "tinkering" with the car but that somewhat trivializes the job. It does go beyond a standard tinker which is probably an oil change or serp belt change. Now, walts car, being a 93, would not be destroyed if he did something wrong with the timing. Yours, however, being a 99, might sustain some damage. On the flip side, doing your own work is a tremendous "confidence booster". It will boost your self-confidence in that what you set out to accomplish, with due diligence and attention to detail, you can successully complete. My son and I just got done replacing a head gasket, timing belt and water pump on a 92 ES300. I had never removed the heads on an side-mounted overhead cam engine before and he had only changed oil in a car. But I looked upon the job as a tremendous learning experience and confidence booster for him as a young man. I taught him how to research the project, how to bag the bolts, label connectors, vacuum lines and take lots of pictures. He performed the brunt of the work under my supervision. When he got stuck or discouraged, I came alongside and helped. The job is completed now and he has a beautifully running ES300 to drive around. For me, mission accomplished. No, not the head gasket, TB/WP. The mission of instilling greater confidence in a young man. And that it did. He is now "unafraid" to rip into it. The confidence then spills over into other areas of his life. The monetary savings ain't too bad either! ;)
  41. 1 point
    For anyone looking at this thread Metra finally made a dash kit. They have wiring harnesses as well. I will Post a link to the site so you can get the product numbers. I would recommend just typing in the numbers and find the parts on Amazon or Sonicelectronics. They are much cheaper there than at a best buy or retail store. If the link doesn't work just go to Metraonline.com Good Luck! Hope this helps http://metraonline.com/vfg
  42. 1 point
    how did you deal with the plastic cover? did you remove it completely or did you drill a hole to run the kit's wires through?
  43. 1 point
    This was requested by a member in another thread. Another member responded that this would be difficult to do because everyone uses different products and he is right. But in all honesty there really is a set sequence of steps that are done when you detail properly. There is some variance in product usage, but not in the technique. First of all I'm going to mention several different possibilities of products used for each step. You'll notice that most of these products are professional grade and probably will have to be ordered online. That is because in my experience the consumer products are just that, designed for consumers who don't know or care about having the best finish possible. Professional grade products give the experienced hobbyist and professional detailer greater control over what is being done with the paint. Here are the ESSENTIALS you will NEED these to get started. -Several Microfiber towels, I say 6, 3 small 3 big. I reccomend them from our site www.lexuscarcare.com or www.pakshak.com. MF will be mush less prone to scratch than cotton. -Several 100% cotton bath towels, 3 or so. These will be used folded up to work in swirl removers and polish because they have more "bite" than MF. MF will be used for removal. -Several foam and MF applicators, you can get these where you get the towels. -Eagle one Tire Swipes for spplying dressing to tires -A semi stiff brush for tires and wheel wells -2 nice 5 gallon buckets -Some sort of paint cleaner like Meguiars #9, #82 Swirl Free Polish, 1Z Paint Polishes (which work very well by hand) -Some sort of polish like Meguiars #7, P21S Gloss Enhancing Paintwork Cleanser, #81 Hand Polish from Meguiars. -Some sort of wax. We're following a carnuaba/hybrid system here as thats whats best to use if you're only working by hand. So something like Meguiars #26 Tech Wax paste, P21S, or Meguiars NXT, Poorboys EX or EX-P, Blackfire woul\d work well -Glass cleaner- I reccomend Eagle One's 20/20. -An all purpose cleaner like 1Z Cockpit Premium for the interior plastic and carpeting with a nice soft brush. -Woolite and water dilluted 5:1 for leather -A good tire dressing for the tires and the wheel wells after they are washed. Things that would be NICE: -A Porter Cable dual action polisher with 2 cutting pads, 2 polishing pads, and 1 finishing pad. Its tempting to buy a cheaper buffer from Sears or Pepboys or something but trust me when I tell you, if you want the best and safest results the PC is worth the investment. Cheap buffers (Waxxpro, Craftsman) have weak motors that bog down and cumbersome bonnet type systems that either remove too much or not enough paint. If you're gonna spend the bucks anyways, spend twice as much and get the right tool for the job. -A higher cut compound for real swirl removal with the PC like Meguiars #83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish, Poorboys SSR2, Menzerna Intensive Polish -A Bissel Little Green Clean Machine for cleaning carpeting -Plexus plastic polish for all clear plastic -Clay (ClayMagic or Mothers) First clean the interior. Spray the all purpose cleaner on all plastic parts, agitate with the soft brush and wipe clean, use the woolite on the seats and wipe off with a damp towel. Vacuum the carpets well and spray the cleaner and agitate of needed. Pay attention to the nooks and crannys! Always do the interior first so you dont get dust on clean paint. Now, nextthing to do is wash with a good carwash using a good Microfiber, Chenile or Lanswool mitt. Use two buckets, one with soapy water and one with clean for rinsing the mitt after each pass. Wash in straight lines only, never touch the paint in circles. Wash from the top down then do the wheels last as that is where the most grime is, you don't want to drag that up onto the paint. If its hot rinse each panel after washing it. Dont forget to scrub the wheel wells! Next if you have the clay, clay now. Resoap each panel, clay, rinse until the whole car and the windows are done. Now dry the car using your MF towels, use two towels again in straight lines until the car is dry. Now, dress the wheel wells by spraying the protectant up inside them, then spray the protectant on the tire swipe and do the tires. I always do this before the next steps so it doesn't leave overspray on the car. Now its time to start detailing! If you have moderate to heavy swirls and you have the PC start with it, the DACP and a cutting pad, only work 2'x2' sections at a time. Don't use too much DACP, 3-4 dime sized drops a panel is plenty. Make each section look its best before moving on. Use the PC at high speed (5 or 6) and use random overlapping strokes with moderate pressure until the product almost dissapears. The swirls will come out it just may take time. This stage could take hours so be ready for that but the results are worth it. Work your way around the car, when it stops working as well swap out the pad for a clean cutting pad thats why you have two. If the swirls aren't bad use DACP with a polishing pad instead in the same way. If working by hand fold up one of the terry towels into 8ths, apply the #9 or #82 and work into the paint using moderate pressure. Again work 2x2 sections until almost clean and make each section look its best before moving on. This will not remove all swirls but thats left to later steps to hide. If you used the DACP and a cutting pad then you need to go around with DACP and #9 or #82 and a polishing pad afterwards as DACP and a cutting pad will leave micromarring behind. Next, polishing! If you have the buffer use a clean polishing pad and your polish of choice, use it like the DACP but you don't have to work it as long. If by hand same deal, fold up a terry towel and go to town. Now, stand back and admire the work. The paint should be perfect now, no swirls, smooth as glass, good proper color. This is where you look for areas of problems and do them again until it looks right. Now comes the waxing! You can wax by hand or by PC with the finishing pad. Use straight lines and put down a thin coat. Wait depending on the instructions on the wax then buff off IN STRAIGHT lines with an MF towel. Layer and add coats as you see fit. Don't forget to wax the wheels. Next is windows. Get your 20/20 and some paper towels, and newspaper. Spray the 20/20 on the paper towel until its soaked, then scrub it into the window. Next, wipe clean with the newspaper, inside and out all the way around. You can now wax the windows if you'd like but its not neccisary. Now thats it, you're done, sit back and admire your work. Watch for missed patches of wax and wax stuck in creases and crevices. Congratulations!
  44. 1 point
    Bambi might not have been the culprit that took out the ambient temp sensor as my wife has over the almost 10 years we have had this car had up close and personal contact with not only the deer (which ran off after the incident) but also: a fox, a goose, a racoon, and several small birds ( all fatalities )resulting in trips each time to the body shop to replace plastic front end parts broken by the impacts. thinking on this and being reminded of the history of carnage with this this car, it now seems more likely to me that the damage was done by one of the smaller victims which could have better penetrated the rather protected location of the sensor...a bird going through that lower grill at 65 mph could have done it....precision bombing in effect.
  45. 1 point
    guy4rmsky, There are 4 sunroof drain tubes, two up front that exit down the A pillars, and two that run from the rear side channels of the sunroof, and exit down through the C pillar and out between the rear bumper cover and the sheet metal, just back of the rear wheel. If those rear drains are plugged, or the drain hose has come off the tube at the sunroof channel, you'll get water into the back seat area. If the tube has come off, its usually because the plastic tubing has aged and split. Sometimes you can put a long copper tube on the end of a compressor hose, and with the sunroof partially opened, get it back to the rear of the sunroof side channel and blow out the drain tube. The only other way is to pull the weatherstrip from around the rear door, remove the rear seat bottom and back, pop the C pillar moulding off, remove the overhead assist strap, and gently pull down the headliner to get at the end of the drain tube and reattach it or replace it. The only other way for water to get into the back seat area, is through the trunk seal, the tail lights or the rear windshield. Sometimes the shape of the trunk floor will allow water from these areas to flow forward and into the back seat area. You have some detective work on your hands. Good Luck!
  46. 1 point
    The noise is always there. But it is loudest when first starting the car. You have the standard engine noise that everyone expects. This noise is above and beyond standard engine noise. I use the remote starter in the morning and I can hear that buzzing/whining noise from inside the house. It is not a deafening noise, but it just is not what I expect from a Lexus. The sound sort of sounds like a car that is low on power steering fluid. It is really annoying...... The noise is loudest in the area of the oil pan on the passenger side of the vehicle. If anyone else has a RX450H and can listen to my recording, I would be interested if they hear the same type of noise.
  47. 1 point
    I beleive it is a cr1216 battery, Get yourself a small jewelers phillips head screwdriver and remove the scvrew at the base of the fob, Open it up and simply replace the old battery, Reverse order to put it back together and your done. ;) Buy a couple extra batteries and keep them with the screwdriver in the glovebox. B)
  48. 1 point
    Pictures of my adapter tray and coin holder. These items came installed from the dealer. I think they are stock on the 07 350. I did not see them listed on the Premium Plus package. You can also see the different ledges and diagonal divider in the adapter tray. This is what my original post was asking about. Why these shapes and sizes? Just getting fancy or is there some reason? Some specific function? Dave
  49. 1 point
    Hi - just wanted to thank blue06gs for the great bypass for dvd and dialing. only took bout an hour goin slow and it works absolutely perfect. no one should be hesistant to try this bypass. good luck and thanks!
  50. 1 point
    Well, this won't be much help, but for what's it's worth, I'm having the same problem on my '92, except the light won’t go off (meaning trac control won't come on). Similar to your problem, my switch does not click or appear to engage. When I asked the dealer about it at a recent visit, they informed me the “Trac Accumulator” (which I gather is the brains behind the system) had gone bad and I needed a new one at a cost of about $800. I passed. Would be curious to know if you find a fix though. Good luck!



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