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  1. 2 points
    It could be a good opportunity if you really want an LS 500 and especially if you plan to keep it a long time. You might be able to negotiate a even lower price based on the vehicle's history. I read recently that there are still a lot of unsold new 2018 LS 500's so the market for them is apparently very soft. Other than its run-flat tires and no spare tire, my main problem with the LS 500 is the shrinking interior which now has a volume within a tenth of a cubic foot of the space of a 2019 Toyota Camry with its optional moonroof. The Camry we rented 6 weeks ago was actually roomier than an LS 500 since the rental Camry didn't have a moonroof. Of course, Toyota/Lexus is too ashamed of it to publish interior volume dimensions for the LS 500 so it's necessary to go elsewhere to find them: https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/lexus/ls/2018/specs/ls-awd-398085 Lexus LS 500 - Passenger Volume (cu. ft.): 99.4 Toyota Camry (with moonroof) - 99.3 cu. ft. per https://www.toyota.com/content/ebrochure/2019/camry_ebrochure.pdf I know the luxury sedan market has shrunk due to the flight to SUV's but I never expected the Lexus LS interior to shrink.
  2. 2 points
    Trevor, Thanks for the info. You were correct, I had not connected the temp sender wire. It is a bugger of a thing to locate and even more difficult to fit the connector when the entire loom is in situ. The sender unit is tucked in behind the plastic spark plug channel. Done now, so everything is fine. Thanks again, Alan.
  3. 2 points
    I discovered this article today, thanks to a member at ClubLexus. I went and made a scan of my copy, thanks to his discovery. I don't suppose it would hurt to post it here:
  4. 2 points
    Thanks for the posting! We always like new information. Paul
  5. 2 points
    Hi Nathan. I apologize for not connecting with you sooner. I am always amazed at the depth of friendship and caring that can be built with someone you have never met nor never knew what they looked like. The LOC is a place where those who enjoy their hobby can find others who like swapping stories with like minded friends. Landar was a great part of the LOC and was a great source of Lexus info and technical help. Thank you for letting us share your journey. Paul
  6. 2 points
    Incredible shots Steve!!. Looks like a wonderful trip.
  7. 2 points
    Hey guys i made a small video on how to replace the plastic coolant tees that get brittle with age and can crack / leak / break / leave you stranded. Its a fairly straight forward process, everything is covered in the video from tools to parts. If you have any questions let me know. Parts needed for this job: (1) Gallon of coolant - PN# 00272-1LLAC-01 (2) Coolant Tees - PN# 87248-60460 Optional, highly recommended parts for this job: (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A220 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A210 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A190 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A180 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 87245-6A800 (1) Coolant hose - PN# 99556-20155
  8. 2 points
    I have NO connection with this automobile.... just showing others JDM RHD TOYOTA CELSIOR VIP SEDAN V8 LS400 JAPAN IMPORT TEXAS TITLE look: https://easttexas.craigslist.org/cto/6180839156.html
  9. 2 points
    I made the DIY because I couldn't find one specifically for the RX330. Lexus also apparently think no RX330 owner would ever change their own oil because they don't tell you how to locate the oil dilter and drain plug in the owner's manual. I hope others find this useful. Please comment. I have a 2004 RX330 and after 23,000 miles, I've decided I'm going to do minor maintenance myself. You'll need: - 5qts of 5w-30 oil - oil filter (see info below) - drain plug gasket (see info below) - 10mm socket wrench - 14mm socket wrench - oil catch container - oil filter wrench (I used the nylon strap which seems pretty versitile) - either jack stands or ramps - funnel - rags to soak up dripping oil Part numbers: Lexus parts: 90430-12031 - Gasket Oil Drain Plug 90915-YZZD1-01 - Oil Filter - 6 Cylinder Toyota equivalent: 904-3012028 or 3012031 drain plug gasket $1.04 089-2202011 oil filter $4.99 1) Jack up the front of your car on stands or use ramps. The RX330 weighs 3850 lbs so make sure your ramps/stands can handle it. You might be able to get away without raising it if you slide on the floor, but it's tight. 2) Pop your hood and unscrew off the oil cap. I stuck a yellow funnel in mine. Notice the yellow dip stick on the left. 3) Lexus put some cosmetic plastic panels to make the "less car savy" believe the car is a magic transportation pod with no ugly mechanical internals. You'll need to remove two of them to access the filter and drain plug. The orange highlight is the panel that hides the filter, and the purple arrow shows where the panel that hides the drain plug is. 4) Get under the car to look for the drain plug panel (purple arrow in above picture). The panel will look like this. Remove all the 10mm bolts. 5) With the panel removed, the drain plug is revealed. Get a 14mm socket wrench and loosen the bolt. Position your oil catch container and remove the bolt. Lexus engineers did good.. they designed the bolt angle so the oil shoots down instead of to the side. Very nice. Remove the drain plug bolt AND its gasket. If the gasket is not on the bolt, it's probably still stuck to the oil pan. Remove the gasket and discard. 6) As the oil is draining, work on removing the panel to the oil filter (orange). Remove all the 10mm bolts (red arrows). 7) There are two plastic clips (green arrows) also holding this panel on. Using a flathead screwdriver, carefully pry up the center part of the clip just a little. This will loosen the clip and the whole clip can be pulled out. 8) Pull off the panel. The other panels will be overlapped over it, but they flex enough to allow you to remove it. This is what it looks like without the panel. 9) After the oil is done draining, put the new gasket on the bolt and replace the bolt. Tighten the bolt for a good seal but don't over tighten. I don't know the official torque yet. Wipe up the oily bolt. UPDATE: I got the Lexus service info... Torque the drain plug to 33ft-lbs (45Nm, 459 kgf-cm) 10) With the panel off, you can now see the oil filter (orange) and a nice gift from the Lexus engineers: an oil catch (green). Loosen the filter, and residual oil will drip out. The oil catch will guide the dripping oil out the oilpan/drainplug panel so position your oil catch below the catch. 11) On the new filter, dab a layer of fresh oil on the O-ring (the rubber ring around the outer lip of the open end of the filter). Align the threads of the new filter and spin it by hand onto the engine where the old filter was. When it makes contact, tighten by hand another 3/4 turn. Don't over tighten. 12) Wipe up oil drips. For me, even though the catch was there, some oil still dripped all over the exhaust pipe and panels. Wipe this up. 13) Fill the engine with 5w-30 oil, 5 qts. A funnel is helpful here. 14) Replace oil cap. 15) Replace both plastic panels. 16) Shut hood and drive around the block. Park the car on level ground and wait 15 minutes. Check for leaks and oil level. I hope this is helpful to someone. ...
  10. 2 points
    We recently purchased a new 2017, Lexus RX350 and love it. Selling our original, one owner, 1994, LS400, with 88,000 miles. This superior designed and built, Generation 1 Lexus has been faithful to us as we have been faithful to it. We loved it and still love it. Its new owner will be blessed with full maintenance documentation and records from DAY ONE and any responses to any questions regarding its history will leave our hands with full disclosure of only "the truth". We would not hesitate to keep it and insure it with Hagerty Insurance as a "modern classic", BUT we do not have the room. If it should not sell to the right appreciative and discriminating buyer of this superior condition Lexus, we may have to make room! It is in truly excellent condition and will serve its new owner well. An ad is posted with www.ClassicCars.com. Go to the ad directly from Classic Car's front page by entering "979779" in the "cc-" prompt where indicated. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any further questions at woodman486@kc.rr.com.
  11. 1 point
    The LX470 suspension is rough but nothing like "beating to death". This is having 3 different brands of tires what is most likely causing a bumpy ride. This is also a huge safety issue. In my region, we've recently had a driver who died as he was driving at circa 60mph, had to make a sudden maneuver but was unable to retain control of a car due to different tire threads and their different level of wear and tear. He smashed into a truck and died. Not ideally, but you can still have front/rear tires of a different thread pattern/wear and tear, however, both of the front tires should have the same pattern/wear and tear and both of the rear tires should have the same pattern/wear and tear (and you'd put the most worn tires on the rear axle). Ideally, all four tires should be the same. Other things which may cause a bumpy ride are: - dirt on the wheel disks. Not your case (having driven 300 miles, the dirt must have gone away); - a wrong wheel alignment. Best to perform a wheel alignment once a year.
  12. 1 point
    Did you make sure that the cam and crank sensors are plugged in? When you say " Does not crank " what do you actually mean? Is the engine turning but just will not start? Lastly are there any codes?
  13. 1 point
    as a NEW member, the FIRST thing you need to do is SEARCH other people's steering problems, this has been covered for years. there are even videos showing you how to fix it.. THEN if you dont understand, ask for help. a 5 cent garden hose washer will fix it (usually). see videos.. 2 screws to remove the covers, then 3 screws to remove the plate and you are looking at it.
  14. 1 point
    I don't think the oil change or the sludge would be responsible for the engine cutting out. However, I would look for fault codes and also carry out grass roots diagnostics (checking battery terminals and battery condition and then carrying on through the car one step at a time). It's laborious but does throw up interesting faults that would otherwise go undetected. Check also the fuel quality and drain/refill if suspect
  15. 1 point
    I have a 1999 GS-300 with 130,000 miles on it. Had lots of issues with the vehicle cranking over recently. Got into my car turned the ignition and click, nothing happened. Tried to crank the engine again and click! Nothing again...... My battery was my 1st thought but, my lights were bright and radio and fan were working right. So I saw a couple postings on the lexus owners club and thought I would tackle this job myself. This problem was intermittent, sometimes the car turned over and sometimes it didn't. Recently it would take me up to 10 minutes for the car to crank over and start, so I had to do something. I just finished up the job in about 2 hours (start to finish) and thought somebody might read this and make it useful. So here I go to try and tell you how to fix the starter problem and tell you what tools you'll need. Actually after doing the job it was well worth the effort. The problem turned out to be the "Copper Contacts inside the Starter Solenoid" with a total bill of $5.00 (yep I said Five Dollars if you do it yourself). Before you begin, locate your local Alternator/Starter Rebuilding Shop, you'll need them for the Copper Contacts that are located inside the Starter Solenoid ($5.Dollars) They sold them to me separately. Tools required: Patience, 10mm., 12mm.,14mm.,15mm,16mm socket, socket wrench, universal swivel socket attachment, (2) Extra Long Socket Extensions 12"inches each, 9/32"nds nut runner or socket. So here we go: Step by step 1st Things First - you'll need to disconnect your battery to the car both positive and negative leads. Pop your hood. You need a 10 mm. socket and socket wrench to disconnect the battery. (Remember, you'll lose all your settings on your radio, seat memory etc.... but worth it - and if you have any warning light on your dash, like check engine light they'll go off too after you disconnect and reconnect the battery.) The starter and solenoid are located on the driver side of the car engine. They are piggybacked next to each other in one unit. 2nd - you need to disconnect the transmission dip stick to move it out of your way to get the starter out. (You'll need a 12mm. socket with socket wrench) The bolt is located at the top of the dip stick that is attached to the engine. Feel free to pull the dip stick all the way out and put it in a safe place. You don't actually need to take the outside shell of the dip stick out all the way just pull it out about 4 inches and move it to the right or left, it's attached at the bottom by a rubber wire holding clamp. Just move it aside for now. 3rd - Disconnect the lead wires that are going to the starter, there are two - one is a black push connector that you must push the center button in to remove the wire connector as you pull the wire out, and the other is under the rubber black boot that is the power connection that is coming from your battery. Pull back the black rubber boot and expose the 12 mm. nut that must be removed to get the cable off the starter. You'll need a 12mm. socket and wrench to get this nut off. Once you remove the cable put the 12mm. nut back on the starter so it doen't get lost. 4th - Crawl under your vehicle and take your 14 mm. socket, socket wrench and swivel adapter with you with (2) Extra Long 12" inch extentions, you'll need the extra lengths to get the bolts to turn and free your rachet up to swing and loosen the 14mm. bolt heads. Don't take the bolts out all the way, leave them in housing as long as the starter is able to come out. The only reason I say this is because the starter will be easier to re-install once your done fixing it. Now, take your starter out from the bottom, it's a little tight but it will come out. 5th - Put your starter on a work bench or preferably a Vice to hold the starter in place so it won't fall. Locate the (3) 9/32" inch cover nuts and remove them with a 9/32" inch nut runner or socket. Take care not to lose the nuts. Remove the top cover of the solenoid. Once you remove the top cover you'll see the two copper contacts on opposite sides of the solenoid. Remove the center copper solenoid, be careful because at the bottom of the solenoid is a pointed tip with a long 3" spring that actually pushed the started gear out once powered on with your ignition key. Put this center solenoid off to the side with the 3" Spring. Now locate the two copper contacts on opposite sides of the solenoid housing (these are the contacts that need to be replaced.. these are the parts that are causing all your problems with your starter - all for $5 Bucks, notice how black and pitted the copper contacts are). At this point this is where I actually took my whole starter to a Alternator/Starter Rebuildng Shop in a plastic bag with the solenoid cover off and showed them the starter and contacts and they had them in stock. (The 2 Copper Contacts) were tiny copper 90 degree clips with a 1/4 Moon Shape to them, no larger than 1 1/2"inches and no bigger than a quarter. Once I got the Copper Contacts back home the fun started! I can't believe how little they were and how easy they were going to be replaced for just $5. Five bucks. This was going to save me a ton of money. Now this is where you'll need to take the (2) nuts off the one side of the solenoid, one nut (12 mm.) is where we originally removed the cable wire from the battery and there is another nut that holds the copper contact into place. I think this is a 15mm. socket (but don't quote me on this one - sorry I forgot what size it was), but remove this nut also, this is the last nut holding the copper contact into place. Once you remove the nut you'll be able to slide the copper contact out, but be careful not to lose the thin washer and small rubber O-Ring attached to the Copper Contact Post. One side of the contact is a Rectangular Copper Square attached to a Copper Post the Copper Contact actually slides over the post for mounting purposes. Take note how the contact is positioned because you'll have to re-install the NEW Copper Contact the same way. You can remove the contact now. Make sure you note what Copper Contact goes where, one is larger than the other. Replace the contact with the same NEW COPPER CONTACT and re-install the same way. Now on the opposite side, slide back the rubber boot that is covering the other contact post bolt and nuts. Be careful because their is another small washer and "O-Ring" on the other side too. Take care to remove the Copper Contacts the same way and install the other NEW COPPER CONTACT and re-install the same way. Re-assemble the Nuts in the same manner and tighten. Slide the boot cover back over the post and re-assemble putting the center solenoid back inside the housing, re-install the cover of the solenoid. Your starter solenoid is now complete. Re-assemble everything is reverse order and now your done. Hope this helps the Do-It-Yourself Guys. Any questions, feel free to comment me back. Hope I didn't miss anything.... Blaise
  16. 1 point
    Yeah, the very inside of the back tires will rub pretty easily on the spring perch if you're not careful with your tire size, especially with a more square tire tread. looks like your current tires are pretty rounded on the inside... the fronts can fit whatever pretty easily.
  17. 1 point
    The rx400h has rear struts, the 450h has the spring and shocks
  18. 1 point
    Hey all! First post here, so I accidentally purchased this incredible 1998 LS 400 with 54K original miles. This isn't exactly a for sale ad, as I'm sure you'd all be happy to take a look at my new car - HOWEVER, the purchase was technically a mistake... Seeing as this was purchased sight unseen - I'm pretty happy with it's incredible condition! It is a California car, now in North Jersey and the timing belt was done at 48K miles.
  19. 1 point
    Hi all, I believe I have posted here before a long time ago with my old LS430 LEX, I now have a 2007 LS460L with 110K on it now. I have owned it for a few years now, since 65K miles, and recently I started having acceleration/hesitation problems. I did alot of research, and didn't find very many good answers. I did have the transmission and engine ECU update flashed, with some improvement, but after that didn't solve the problem, I was convinced it was the cylinder head replacement deal, which was way out of my budget with 5 kids....and I thought it was ridiculous that a flagship sedan would need that kind of serious motor work with just 100K on it. Anyway, my mechanic suggested BG 44K fuel system cleaner, NOT available at places like autozone. He sells it for $28 per can, but I found on Ebay for $16.75 and up with free ship. First and foremost, I ALWAYS used quality, premium gas (Shell V-Power or QT), and Techron additive from time to time, so I was super unconvinced about his recommendation. I had even listed my LS for sale, again, convinced that the motor had cylinder issues after reading blogs about LS460 acceleration issues. Also, for the record, I have NO affiliation with BG or anything like that. THIS STUFF WORKS! It truly fixed my hesitation problems, completely. I am no longer selling the car, and am happy again, as it accelerates like it is supposed to. Feel free to read many other peoples reviews on this stuff, its amazing and really seems to work. After i drove it to wrok (25 miles one way) I thought i felt a difference, by the drive home, I KNEW I felt the difference, after the full tank, i was truly smiling. I have ordered 4 more cans for my other vehicles and boat, and suggested it to my friend with a ISF, my brother with an SC430, and my buddy with a Vette. I guess these LS460 cars are just picky after a while and maybe the injectors get gummed up? I don't pretend to be a mechanic, again this was suggested by my Lexus mechanic, After alot of depressing research with no real answer, just wanted to share my experience with any other LS460 owners, as it is a beautiful car, and I was disappointed in what I was thinking the problems I had. It was the best $17 I have recently spent, and if you are having similar weak/lack of acceleration or hesitation issues, i would say TRY IT for less than $20. I believe you can go to BG's site and find a local dealer, again, not autozone or O'Reilly or anything like that, says professional use only lol. Also, need a funnel, comes in a coke can basically. Just my 2 cents, hoping to help out any other LS460 owners out there depressed about their car, it seems most people just said they'd trade it in and buy a new one, but I'm not that rich :)
  20. 1 point
    I just purchased a white and beige interior 1996 Lexus LS 400 that belonged to an old lady that never drove it practically. The car was purchased with 9,547 original miles. It is still under 10,000 miles The car looks like it just came out from dealership and still smells new
  21. 1 point
    One of your driven devices is freezing up. ie the alternator, power steering pump, air conditioning compressor, or one of the idlers. Before putting belt on spin each to make sure they are free. I would suspect the air conditioning compressor when energized is the culprit.
  22. 1 point
    Here is a new photo array of the new LF -1 Crossover which will apparently replace the RX. What I noticed was the selection of power plants that will be available. Gas, fuel cells?, all electric, and hybred. Paul https://lexusenthusiast.com/2018/01/15/introducing-the-lexus-lf-1-limitless-flagship-crossover-concept/
  23. 1 point
    Hello Everyone, I know IACV has been a huge topic on the forum and I have found various pictures in the RX forum and ES forum on the idle air control valve (IACV) or as others call it the idle speed control valve (ISC). However, I have not found a "step by step" posting to date which definitively shows how to clean this thing so that my car stops giving me idling problems. Symptoms I have had included: - low and rough idling that would cause the car engine to start shaking after starting the car - this eventually got worse to the point that when I start my car, it would not idle unless I gave it gas - idling problems for me tended to occur more often after my engine was warm or had been sitting in the sun I hope these series of postings help you fellow LOC members out there. You've certainly helped me in the past so here's my two cents at this common problem. Additionally, the instructions I give are the way in which I have cleaned it myself. As you go about and attempt this, you may find better ways to do so. Please add and refine my instructions/terminology as needed. I am not a professional. I've only changed my oil, air filters, and conducted minor maintenance previously. The bottom line is that if you have the right tools, you should be able to do this. This discovery/ cleaning took me about 2 hours to do cause I ran into problems and there were major steps left out in previous postings that I’ve encountered read. The next time I do this, I believe I can get this done in about an hour or less. Tools Needed: 1) Tightly fitting Philips Screw Driver 2) Carb cleaner that is O2 sensor safe (I've seen CRC. I used Valvoline Carb Cleaner) 3) Locking Grip Pliers (definitely helped me remove the factory tight screws) 4) Small brush for cleaning 5) Towels for cleaning 6) Pliers (help removed brackets holding the hoses) 7) Latex gloves helps with limit the messiness. * I used the same gasket and did not replace it. No problems found. 1) Remove the hose that comes from the engine/motor that connects to the air intake hoses.( Hose is below in red – we’ll refer to this as Hose A) When you pull back the rubber hose covering, you will see that a metal bracket is holding the hose pretty tightly in place. Use the pliers to clasps the two metal pieces together to loosen the bracket and pull the hose loose. You can also do this by hand if it’s easier for you. 2) Upon removing the hose, you will want to remove the two air intake hoses. Loosen the three screws above in green and remove the hose. Below is a picture of the intake hoses removed. 3)After removing the intake hoses, I opened the lid to the air filter and moved this to the side of the car to create more working room. I believe there are two clips on the right holding the lid in place. Just pop the two clips and move the cover to the side. I also took out the air filter and temporarily moved this to the side. 4)After removing the intake hose, the throttle body/IACV/black electric coil is revealed. At this point, I removed the black electric wire from the black coil. Once the electric wire is removed you can remove the black coil from the IACV by removing the two screws. Note, the screws are factory tight so use a tight fitting screw driver to remove the screws. One of my screws was partially stripped from the dealership’s work, so I had to resort to my locking grip pliers which helped out tremendously. After removing the two screws, the black electric piece pops right off. When the black electrical coil is removed from the IACV, it exposes a small pencil sized metal stud. You will also notice a washer that sits on this stud. Don’t lose this washer. Take it and put it aside so it doesn’t fall off when you continue on in the next steps. 5)Additionally, I removed the hose coming out of the IACV. We’ll call this Hose B. This hose can be removed in the same manner by clamping the bracket and pulling the hose out. You will see that the hose is removed below. Below are pictures of before and after. 6)Here is where the fun begins. I initially attempted to remove the four screws attached to the IACV at this point, but found that after an hour, this would be nearly impossible to remove considering the location of the screws were in an extremely tight spot. The only way I would be able to remove the IACV is to remove right throttle body. Not as tough as it sounds. Three screws need to be removed to accomplish this. Again, be careful when removing the screws. Also you will see I removed another electric plug and I also cut a tie wrap. Once you complete these steps, the throttle body/ IACV comes out pretty easily. Note when you remove the throttle body, there will be one LAST hose connected to the IACV. Be careful when you remove this hose as radiator fluid may spill. Some of my fluid spilled out so I just refilled my coolant after I was done. 7)Below is a picture of the bottom view of the IACV. You now can EASILY remove the four screws connecting the IACV to the throttle body . In the picture below, I have already removed one of the screws. Once the four screws are removed the IACV and throttle body separate. Now you can clean both of them with your carb cleaner, brush, towels, cotton swabs etc…. Picture here is before I the cleaning with all the muck inside Pictures after I cleaned the IACV and throttle body This last picture is the post throttle body cleaning 8) Once you are done cleaning, just put back the throttle body/iacv the same way you took it off, and put everything back in reverse order. Ensure the gasket is in place. Also, ensure you put the washer back on the electric coil. Make sure you place hose A & B back and ensure the electric plugs are back in their original position. Once these things are in place, then it's all about putting the air filter/hoses back and you are good to go. If you have lost any coolant, make sure you refill it to a safe level. After completing this cleaning, my car starts up without any problem and idles as if I just purchased the car brand new. Replacing this at a dealership would have costed me $300-400 easily. Let me know if you have any questions. Cheers (Also, I tried to post these as separate replys, but the software combined all my replies into a single reply and did not keep them separated) *Edited the posting to have the pictures follow step by step in sequential order*
  24. 1 point
    The optional LED headlamps of the 2013 GS450h aren't necessarily better than the HID headlamps you have now. As the IIHS has found in their tests, there is no correlation between light source type (halogen, HID, LED) and performance: http://www.iihs.org/iihs/ratings The IIHS found that optional headlight systems were often worse that the standard systems. IMO, your best move is simply to verify that your headlamps are working correctly and aimed properly. Modern headlamps have become too complex to muck with - not like the old days of standard headlamp unit sizes in North America when one could slap a set of E-code Cibie or Hella units into a car and get a vast improvement. I did that on countless vehicles. I wish the IIHS would test the headlights of all vehicles. I'm getting tired of blindly (pun intended) buying vehicles with HID and LED headlights and just hoping they will be good.
  25. 1 point
    Update with a happy ending... So I posted this thread on many lexus blogs and several people responded that I should consider checking all the fuses. One thread suggested looking at the 30 amp AN1 fuse under the big cover in the engine area. That exact fuse was dead. I researched the circuit for that fuse and it controls the ignition including the spark plug coil. I replaced the AN1 fuse and the GX started right up but died in seconds and the fuse was blown again. It also sounded like I had a leaking exhaust manifold on the passenger side. I immediately noticed the spark plug #2 from the firewall on passenger side was coated in soot. I removed the 10mm bolt and pulled on the coil assembly and the top coil box broke away from the coil shaft connected with a tail of copper wire. I pulled on the wire and the rest of the coil shaft assembly came out including the spark plug. Thats right, the spark plug was not screwed in to the head. I replaced the coil pack with a NAPA part, added a new iridium plug, added another 30 amp fuse and it started right up and remained running. This fix ended up taking about 15 minutes and under $100, a big win win. But how in the hell did that plug get so loose. The odor I smelled was the exhaust melting the silicone boot and plastic housing. I ran codes and it came back as a spark plug coil. How awesome is it that I know not a lot about cars and a few hours on the internet and helpful suggestions from people all over got me back on the road - THANKS to all who helped.
  26. 1 point
    I'm guessing that maybe a battery reset may bring the screen back to life...certainly worth trying as a starting point.
  27. 1 point
    Brake rotors will usually have a light coat of oxidation, but those definitely have more rust than usual. It's obvious he used some cheaper aftermarket ones from probably advanced auto or Autozone. Those cheap rotors are sometimes made from china. I mean, It will still perform fine. Your OEM lexus rotors would've been fine. I don't understand why didn't he just use and resurface/machine your original rotors.
  28. 1 point
    People, people, people, I CANT even imagine some one with ONLY one key to their Lexus, your FIRST purchase SHOULD be to buy a second... (cost is no reason to not have one)... IF you cant afford one dont buy the car.... what ever happens is something YOU have already accepted ..... GO and buy a second one today... I hope I never see another post like this one...
  29. 1 point
    Speed sensor is located on the passenger side hub.
  30. 1 point
    Just did a 6200 mile road trip around Europe. 16 countries in 16 days. All the way to the tip of Norway (most northern road in the while of (europe) to Italy and Austria (highest road in europe) The best was driving up the Stelvio pass in Italy. Here is a brief video of our Adventure.
  31. 1 point
    I did the math over the course of two months. Using 93 octane from Shell or BP in the GX improves overall mileage enough to actually save 1.3 cents per mile in fuel cost. But even if it cost a little more per mile, my butt dyno says the engine runs noticeably better with hi-test.
  32. 1 point
    Hi John and welcome! We have a 2016 RX and have about 6500 miles on it. We love the crossover size and the interior is way cool. Even the mpg is not bad. On interstate driving we've gotten close to 30 mpg. I've had 3. ES350's and you defiantly do not get the smooth and quiiiet ride of the ES. I have found that over time, I have adjusted to the bumps and stiffer suspension. By the way, the RX350 is the best selling car that Lexus product.
  33. 1 point
    Thanks for your response. My husband and I have also seen many on the street. I will begin taking pictures as well.
  34. 1 point
    Agreed, check the TPS, if you can, reset the ecu. because if you changed any inputs, it has to re-learn its parameters. also see fuel pressure, pressure regulator, and Air flow meter/air intake for any suspicious leaks or blockages. stumbling when you press the gas can sometimes be from either too much, or too little air.
  35. 1 point
    I assume the sub would be 4 ohms as well. For a huge amount of Lexus Technical information, go to "TLS.com. This is the official Toyota website for Toyota-Lex-Scion.com and all technical information. You must join and a two day use is $15. If you can't find it here you don't need it. LOL Paul
  36. 1 point
    Yeah the Y-pipe is a common problem, water and whatever else gets trapped inside the shielding and rusts it out. Same thing happened to mine. It would be better to remove the shielding altogether.
  37. 1 point
    Thanks for the heads up! It seems once they get you past the warranty period they don't care. It's all about business and they will wait until a class action. It used to be if you took care of your car, it would last AND look good! I'll reconsider putting so much $ in a car in the future. Best of luck to you too!
  38. 1 point
    Move to the northeast. Your problem is that you are in California where it is always sunny. In the northeast it is about always cloudy so you won't have the problem. ;)
  39. 1 point
    I bought new fan/controller combo for 150.00 including shipping. (actually was 146.plus change) I installed this last night and problem solved. I would like to add I now have 2 extra fans that are fine. I could not find the controller alone. If anyone needs a fan, right of left, let me know. I would let you have them for the cost of shipping. The multi-meter check was what told me what the issue was. 12V gong in and less than 12V coming out.
  40. 1 point
    no rubbing issues ? I want to do a 245/45/18 on a 18x8 35offset rim cant seem to find any info as to fitment most tire websites suggest 235/45/18 any input from any would be appreciated.Thanks
  41. 1 point
    how did you deal with the plastic cover? did you remove it completely or did you drill a hole to run the kit's wires through?
  42. 1 point
    2006 ES330 Certified pre-owned $24000.00 roughly insurance? I don't now how much? repairs? Where do I begin! I've had several Lexus cars over the years. What I truly USED to like was the fact I could simply trust the dealer shop, and generally, the shop was never necessary anyway! All that changed with the ES330. So why did I move to the 330 from LS models? Well....downsizing is one answer, and besides I liked the styling of the ES over the LS at that time. We had always had such great results wth pre-owned (well, twice before this one) and the service was...wonderful! The ES has turned out to be one of the worst quality cars I have ever owned. And I've even owned Chevrolet so that should set the standard? The car has numerous rattles inside the cockpit. Not all from the same place, not consistent from any one place, but always somewhere, there is a rattle! The transmission hunts for the gear it likes at various times.....disconcerting to say the least. Heat register coves pop off routinely. We put the back in place, a few weeks later they pop off again. The windshield wiper that senses rain? ^&*&$##* !!! It seems to randomly decide when, and if, it wants the windshield cleared. Often times, just pulling into the garage from a rainless night, it decides to clean the windows? Honestly, it's dangerous at times! Now....the service. Well, I suspect this is simply a case of getting too big and not being able to keep up, or assumning all Lexus owners don't really care what it costs? I was informed the front end needed rebuilding. Loose, worn ball joints, etc. I got the quote from them......went to another shop I've done a lot with in the past and they looked, agreed the parts could be replaced, and quoted about half the price. I had them do it of course. For the next several visits to Lexus, I was informed the front end was getting worse? On the third visit, I advised the service rep. that I had already had the parts replaced at another venue. No apology.....no explaination either. I was just informed the stearing hoses are leaking and need replacing......64,000 miles? I guess I don't expect that from Lexus. New brakes were needed at 35,000 miles......again sort of a surprise! If these things really are wearing that fast, maybe I don't need to consider Lexus for the future. Maybe I'm just a bit miffed at this point because I though what one bought with a Lexus was quality, and assurance of a non-hassle interaction with the company. What do you think Lexus? David
  43. 1 point
    Now days, I believe that is called "precision guided all organic ordinance"! lol Your wife is single handedly accounting for the accelerated extinction of several non-threatened species. Whoa to those who reap carnage with a Japanese luxury car while sipping their latte' and listening to the stock reports. (My wife had a pet Deer "Bambi" when she was a child. We hit and kiiled a Deer last year and she was sure it was it's cousin.LOL...)
  44. 1 point
    Just replaced a cracked EGR tube on my son's 96 LS400. I've read all that I can find on the web and found a few tips that may make it easier for any DIYer attempting this himself. First off, for those of you who were able to replace an EGR tube without removing the right side cat I bow at your feet saying "I'm not worthy" repeatedly. I have idea how you pull this off because I couldn't even see the top 2 bolts without taking off the cat. And yes, the bolts on the cat were completely frozen. I stripped 2 of the three upper nuts attempting to get it off. After soaking in PB Blaster for 48hours and then hitting it with a propane torch with no luck, I pulled out the big gun: "CRC Freeze Off!." If you haven't ever uesd this stuff, it's simply amazing. After shooting the nuts/bolts with Freeze Off, 90 seconds later, "BAM!" they're off. So if you're afraid to remove the right side cat because the bolts are frozen, now you know. However, a caution: Freeze off has a flash point of 104 degrees. So be careful. And the way to get the stripped bolts/nuts off is with your Craftsman stripped bolt/screw remover set. Works like a dream even when the nut is stripped round. After getting off the cat, the two lower nuts are cake to get off; top two bolts, not so easy. To get them off, working from the bottom, I used a long extension and swivel socket with painters tape wrapped around the swivel joint. Painter's tape allows you to position the angle of the socket so it doesn't flop around while you're trying to get it on the head of the bolts. When I got the bottom two nuts off the bottom half of the EGR tube fell off and hit me in the face. No wonder it sounded so crappy! Once it was off putting it back on was another challenge. Feeding the tube up from the bottom it's pretty easy to get the flange over the bolts and then just screw the nuts on. No big deal. But getting the proper orientation for the upper two bolts which are inserted into threaded holes is another story because you can't really see much of the treads looking up from the bottom. Note: I've read that a lot of guys work from the top. I couldn't get my hand between the firewall and all the tubes running around the back of the engine to thread the first bolt, the top one, to get the orientation right. Obviously, if you get these bolts cross threaded, or muck up the threaded holes, you're SOL. So I got a little creative. After unbolting the brace that runs along the bottom attached to the exhaust, I jacked the transmission up about 2 inches. I know, living dangerously. But I thought there'd be enough "slack" in the motor and tranny mounts to allow for this after I made sure I wasn't going to pinch any fuel, cooler, or AC lines in the process. Once I felt resistance, I stopped. And I used a big wood block under the tranny pan to prevent damage. Once jacked up the engine had moved far enough away from the firewall that I had enough room to squeeze my hand down the back side of the fire wall to get my hand in position to work. I couldn't hold the bolt in my hand as I worked it down the back of the firewall so I attached a piece of thread to the bolt and lowerd it down into place and then slid my hand down afterwards. Still tight, but doable. Once I could insert the bolt into the flange of the EGR tube I could safely begin to feel the proper orientation to thread the bolt into the threaded hole and position the tube at the same time as well. Once the top bolt was in I had the proper orientation/alingment to insert the bottom bolt in from the underside of the vehicle. I used the same painter tape trick on the swivel but also wrapped painter's tape around the socket leaving about 1/16" protruding about the edge of the socket. I used this to press down on the underside of the bolt once inserted in the socket so that I wouldn't keep losing it when it boinked on something and fell out for the umpteenth time. I Don't honestly know if any of these ramblings will actually help anyone or not. But it sure helped me get this job done myself without having to take it to the dealer ($1100 quote) or drop the tranny. I've already R&R 2 trannies this year so I've met my quota. But WOW does this car run smoother and quieter now....and doesn't sound like a '73 LTD like someone mentioned.
  45. 1 point
    My GX 470 2004 has the same Paint problem like yours !Suspecting this issue is manufactured company's faults ? The paints on rear bumper's coner was unexpecting peeled out like snake's skin ...!?! What's a shame for this kind of luxury cars maker !They don't even care to learn how to paint the right way huh ? Very disappointed and will think twice when we have to buy this kind of cars next time !!!(from Baltimore,Maryland) :cries:
  46. 1 point
    I was told that having a damaged caliper is rare in a vehicle with 60K miles, although this has happened to me for the second time with Lexus doing brakes on two different GX470. Is this a technician error, or just bad luck? By the way, the new caliper was a few dollars south of $500!
  47. 1 point
    Bob, thanks so much! This worked like a charm. I got a glue gun from Michaels arts & crafts and went to work. I played music with bass so I could see the tear. I could not see it by a visual inspection at first. I have pictures and a quicktime movie of the process if anyone wants me to email them. Now my sub is fixed and sounds great! The repair took me about 20 minutes and works.
  48. 1 point
    You'd probably be alright with KYB GR-2s. Your '95 undoubtedly is not as tight as it was stock, and people looking for a 'new" stock feel are occasionally less than completely happy with the GR-2s because they're just a little too stiff to be called an OEM replacement. Sounds right up your alley. They'd also cost you a fraction of the cost of coilovers, which are excessive for the average street driver. if you're trying to get close to a BMW, i'd also check out a strut tower brace and your options with sway bars, and replacing all of your suspension bushings.
  49. 1 point
    No problem, That's one of the reasons were here, Happy to hear that all is well in your garage
  50. 1 point
    Grandpa is correct. i have a 94 just like Wucantstop and the button does not click or stay in and is not supposed to. the "trac off" button works list like the stereo system: push the volume knob in and it will come out back to where it was originally and the stereo will turn on. to add to what grandpa also said, when you first turn the key to "on", the "trac" light should come on in the middle of the speedometer and turn off after a few seconds. this is the system doing a self check. the "trac off" light should also turn on and off at the bottom of the dash when the key is turned to on. if neither of these lights illuminate, you have internal traction control problems just like jakeroux.


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