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  1. 2 points
    Trevor, Thanks for the info. You were correct, I had not connected the temp sender wire. It is a bugger of a thing to locate and even more difficult to fit the connector when the entire loom is in situ. The sender unit is tucked in behind the plastic spark plug channel. Done now, so everything is fine. Thanks again, Alan.
  2. 2 points
    I made the DIY because I couldn't find one specifically for the RX330. Lexus also apparently think no RX330 owner would ever change their own oil because they don't tell you how to locate the oil dilter and drain plug in the owner's manual. I hope others find this useful. Please comment. I have a 2004 RX330 and after 23,000 miles, I've decided I'm going to do minor maintenance myself. You'll need: - 5qts of 5w-30 oil - oil filter (see info below) - drain plug gasket (see info below) - 10mm socket wrench - 14mm socket wrench - oil catch container - oil filter wrench (I used the nylon strap which seems pretty versitile) - either jack stands or ramps - funnel - rags to soak up dripping oil Part numbers: Lexus parts: 90430-12031 - Gasket Oil Drain Plug 90915-YZZD1-01 - Oil Filter - 6 Cylinder Toyota equivalent: 904-3012028 or 3012031 drain plug gasket $1.04 089-2202011 oil filter $4.99 1) Jack up the front of your car on stands or use ramps. The RX330 weighs 3850 lbs so make sure your ramps/stands can handle it. You might be able to get away without raising it if you slide on the floor, but it's tight. 2) Pop your hood and unscrew off the oil cap. I stuck a yellow funnel in mine. Notice the yellow dip stick on the left. 3) Lexus put some cosmetic plastic panels to make the "less car savy" believe the car is a magic transportation pod with no ugly mechanical internals. You'll need to remove two of them to access the filter and drain plug. The orange highlight is the panel that hides the filter, and the purple arrow shows where the panel that hides the drain plug is. 4) Get under the car to look for the drain plug panel (purple arrow in above picture). The panel will look like this. Remove all the 10mm bolts. 5) With the panel removed, the drain plug is revealed. Get a 14mm socket wrench and loosen the bolt. Position your oil catch container and remove the bolt. Lexus engineers did good.. they designed the bolt angle so the oil shoots down instead of to the side. Very nice. Remove the drain plug bolt AND its gasket. If the gasket is not on the bolt, it's probably still stuck to the oil pan. Remove the gasket and discard. 6) As the oil is draining, work on removing the panel to the oil filter (orange). Remove all the 10mm bolts (red arrows). 7) There are two plastic clips (green arrows) also holding this panel on. Using a flathead screwdriver, carefully pry up the center part of the clip just a little. This will loosen the clip and the whole clip can be pulled out. 8) Pull off the panel. The other panels will be overlapped over it, but they flex enough to allow you to remove it. This is what it looks like without the panel. 9) After the oil is done draining, put the new gasket on the bolt and replace the bolt. Tighten the bolt for a good seal but don't over tighten. I don't know the official torque yet. Wipe up the oily bolt. UPDATE: I got the Lexus service info... Torque the drain plug to 33ft-lbs (45Nm, 459 kgf-cm) 10) With the panel off, you can now see the oil filter (orange) and a nice gift from the Lexus engineers: an oil catch (green). Loosen the filter, and residual oil will drip out. The oil catch will guide the dripping oil out the oilpan/drainplug panel so position your oil catch below the catch. 11) On the new filter, dab a layer of fresh oil on the O-ring (the rubber ring around the outer lip of the open end of the filter). Align the threads of the new filter and spin it by hand onto the engine where the old filter was. When it makes contact, tighten by hand another 3/4 turn. Don't over tighten. 12) Wipe up oil drips. For me, even though the catch was there, some oil still dripped all over the exhaust pipe and panels. Wipe this up. 13) Fill the engine with 5w-30 oil, 5 qts. A funnel is helpful here. 14) Replace oil cap. 15) Replace both plastic panels. 16) Shut hood and drive around the block. Park the car on level ground and wait 15 minutes. Check for leaks and oil level. I hope this is helpful to someone. ...
  3. 1 point
    A Lexus Field Tech Specialist made me aware of an aftermarket harness for LC500. Car Tunes in Largo, FL located the harness via a simple internet search and attached a standard front or rear camera. They did the installation for $600 total. The harness allows the camera to integrate with the stock display. When parking just push button on dash and front camera is on for 20 seconds. If you need more time, just push button again. Attached are pictures of camera in grill-(no cutting needed), picture of button and front camera view. Works like a charm-no longer stress parking. Also note carbon fiber wrap to door sills-looks great.
  4. 1 point
    Was the valet key stolen when the car was parked where you frequently park it? If not, the thief might not find your car again. You might be able to have the all the keys "deleted" from the vehicle ECU memory and then have the keys you still have programmed back in. The thief would still be able to unlock and gain access to your car but the stolen valet key could not be used to start the engine. If that is not good enough, yes, you can have the service center replace and program new keys but there will be significant expense to change the door and trunk locks and the ignition switch. Insurance may cover much or all of the cost if you have it.
  5. 1 point
    See if this one works Swigzy Car Cup Holder Expander Adapter with Adjustable Base - Rubber Tabs Securely Hold Large Water Bottles
  6. 1 point
    as a NEW member, the FIRST thing you need to do is SEARCH other people's steering problems, this has been covered for years. there are even videos showing you how to fix it.. THEN if you dont understand, ask for help. a 5 cent garden hose washer will fix it (usually). see videos.. 2 screws to remove the covers, then 3 screws to remove the plate and you are looking at it.
  7. 1 point
    I bought the Polk Audio DB840 8" replacement speaker that is named in youtube videos about replacing the Mark Levinson subwoofer. There is some discussion about replacing a Mark Levinson speaker with an aftermarket speaker. I went with the Polk($54.00) and it sounds fine. Does is sound as good? I couldn't say because before I replaced the ML blown subwoofer I didn't think to study up on the quality of the sound. I installed the Polk and it sounds fine, maybe great. That's very subjective. But it does sound like a high quality and working speaker system. Interesting comment is that the price of the Mark Levinson is in the design and not the hardware. Old ML speaker weighs much less than the Polk but does not seem to have any distinguishing or different features. Thus end that debate for me. Polk ($54.00 ) vs. ML(used -$300.00 - minimum) R&R pretty simple. if by the time you read this , youtube videos still around, they can walk you thru it. One video has you removing rubber ring around new Polk speaker, one has you keeping it. I kept it and modified plastic bracket that goes BELOW speaker and allows speaker to seat properly on car deck.. This is the bracket that screws onto your rear deck . I secured this bracket with 3 little screws drilled into the plastic. Don't let these screws be too long as they will hit metal rear decking of car. Otherwise any little screw will suffice. The other bracket that is attached to ML assembly is no longer needed. to restate: you throw away one of 2 ML brackets and use only the bracket which screws into car rear deck. drill new holes thur existing holes in Polk speaker and into plastic bracket to secure speaker to this bracket. I only used 3 screws. Like someone said this will only be critical if you roll the car. I don't know the electronics theory but I followed instructions for 'shorting' voice mail coil. Why do that , I don't know? Does it have to be done, I don't know either? Its simple though. Get some wire crimpers and connectors and some short speaker wire and get after it. It took me around 3 hours. if I knew what I was doing , under 2 easy . Seat removal is simple. However when you start removing and reinstalling trim which is seated with those plastic punch pins, It gets a little frustrating. It is of course not automatic that you can line up pins with holes in car's sheet metal.
  8. 1 point
    I don't think the oil change or the sludge would be responsible for the engine cutting out. However, I would look for fault codes and also carry out grass roots diagnostics (checking battery terminals and battery condition and then carrying on through the car one step at a time). It's laborious but does throw up interesting faults that would otherwise go undetected. Check also the fuel quality and drain/refill if suspect
  9. 1 point
    ok, I have a 99ls, bought in early 2010, I wrapped my alternator in a clorex bottle and it has been working for 7 years now
  10. 1 point
    Hey guys, Im new here, my name is Blake and am looking for some advise for the following. My dad owns this 1998 GS400: He has been the owner since new, passed it along to my brother, who dropped it and put the wheels on it. And now its back in my fathers hands and he has been looking to do something with the interior. Mainly replace the front seats for lower milage units or something, but I was at the junk yard looking for some Audi gear, and stumbled across a 430 with near perfect black interior. I've always hated the GS steering wheel, because there is no wood grain on it, and the emblem is just plain. but the 430s steering wheel is beautiful on top of being black. I can acquire the entire interior for $375USD, pretty much anything that is black. I'm no stranger to interior swaps, steering wheels coding, motor pulls, etc, but mainly with Audis. I am aware that it will take a lot of time and patience and to spend this amount of effort like this on an old Lexus is not everyones cup of tea. But its always a good time bonding with the father. My questions are primarily the air bags. I read about the single stage vs dual stage. I am a little unfamiliar with the Lexus electronics. In the Audi world, guys simply wire up the high speed impact to the single stage signal. Not at all what I do, nor want to do here. Its been proven to work in Audis, but still not a risk I take with my Audis, nor my fathers car. I figure for the steering column, I will only be swapping the shrouds, and will still be left with the dilemma of single to dual. I would prefer to keep the from having to purchase a complete RX wheel and air bag which is almost the cost of the swap. Can the air bag covers be modified/swapped? What about the rest of the air bags, like the one in the dash, the seats, does anyone know if they are all compatible? Or is the whole 430 a completely different animal? Thanks guys!
  11. 1 point
    Good to know about the key hole. I'll tap on it harder to try to secure it better too.
  12. 1 point
    If you want to save $350 or more, you can also carefully remove the sensor, drill out a 1/16 through hole at the center of the rotary arm & stationary portion...then screw the rotary arm back in place with a tiny screw. I just finished this on mine & it works great. **Just make sure you have a low profile screw head so it doesn't bind into the silver sway arm. Also, you want to wallow out the rotary arm hole a little bigger than the screw - that way the screw only holds into the stationary sensor portion. You don't want the rotary arm engaged w/ the screw trying to turn it. I kept bumping the "trunk close" button when trying to pull away the trunk lid trim. If you remove the 2 top right fuses 10A & 5A in the left trunk fuse block, the trunk lights & trunk operation will stop while you work on the sensor.
  13. 1 point
    I always apply some PTFE tape (plumbers use it for pipe joints) to the sump plug thread....never had a leak on anything ever since. This originally came about when I owned a Land Cruiser and the Toyota dealer asked whether I wanted the soft or hard compound seal for the plug. I foolishly chose the hard compound and leaked like a sieve. Someone suggested removing it and wrapping a couple of turns with PTFE and it worked a treat...nowadays I use it all the time on the 'belt & braces' principle.
  14. 1 point
    That is crazy, the gasket is a crush aluminum washer. Oh well, we will see.
  15. 1 point
    Have you checked that the plastic casing/cap on the filter housing aren't cracked?
  16. 1 point
    Did they clean the area where is was originally leaking? Also did they clean the under panels? Maybe just more residual.
  17. 1 point
    Going to pickup a 1995 sc300 5 speed in teal mist metallic this weekend.
  18. 1 point
    Adding a backup camera to a 2001-2003 LS430 is rather involved. There is a post on ClubLexus on how to do it on an LS430 with the Mark Lev system but I don't know if would work for the standard nav system: https://www.clublexus.com/forums/ls-3rd-gen-2001-2006/511807-how-to-ls430-mark-levinson-everything-w-pics-and-part-s.html#post5620270 If you can't see the attachments in that post, here is a direct link to the YouTube video about it:
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    I guess my issue is nothing with the brakes. Its a communication issue with the instrument cluster. Anyone know if I can get a junked cluster or need to deal with a dealership? either way everything is working fine which is good. so it is just a visible check engine light that bothers me.
  21. 1 point
    Still a few of us around though I upgraded to a 430 then 460L I still have the 98 that stays parked most of the time.
  22. 1 point
    dcfish? Whoa! That's a blast from the past. There have been people looking for you asking about navigation and audio systems. I still drop by this forum once a month or so and sometimes try to help. There's not much in the current Lexus lineup of interest to us. Somebody in Nebraska is driving the 2000 LS400 I sold in 2014 ... wish he would change the name/address associated with the car so Lexus wouldn't contact me about it. My daily driver is still the "Lexus of Minivans" - suits us perfectly for our lifestyle these days. Nice to hear from you!
  23. 1 point
    The service consultant called and stated they got approval to replace both door actuators, which they had in stock, and he is finishing up the paperwork. I asked if I was going to have a problem with the rear and he said "they don't get cycled as much as the front." I told him I guess we will jump off that bridge if we get to it and he laughed. The Lexus gods were good to me.
  24. 1 point
    Yup, just give them time. They'll break through the main market scene soon enough.
  25. 1 point
    https://lexusenthusiast.com/2018/10/25/lexus-named-most-reliable-brand-in-annual-co Consumer Reports says no to MB and BMW!!! Paul
  26. 1 point
    Thanks for the reply. I am having all looked at on Wednesday. I shared your thought on the issues. I appreciate it! Thanks again.
  27. 1 point
    Thanks Trevor for your answer! I have visited Lexus dealer today to they check vibration. Luckily they had a time to check that out. They check balance (did not find anything). Also they make a wheel rotation. Thats all they did. The vibration is now much much lower. Now it feels more like light tingle what could be felt only on good new freeway asphalt. So I probably will wait little while if this gets worse or may be better. This sounds strange that vinbration was almost fixed by the wheel rotation...
  28. 1 point
    Struts are discussed all the time, but my choice is KYB struts and OE mounts....Have put them on RX300 and RX400h and a GMC Yukon....Love these struts. the knock noise is probably broken mount, but could also be a damaged stabilizer bar mount....
  29. 1 point
    Hi Trevor, Thanks. Here's a pic of my new pride and joy. I'm familiar with TRD, just not that particular website, so I was curious if anyone had any experience and could confirm it's not a place that's just going to steal my money 🙂 Thanks for the link to the UK site! Will check it out tonight. Chris
  30. 1 point
    So got a reply, said any Toyota dealer can do lease work on a Lexus if no Lex dealer available. Now we know and knowledge is power! 🙂
  31. 1 point
    My guess is a bad cell in the battery itself.
  32. 1 point
    I have a 1999 GS-300 with 130,000 miles on it. Had lots of issues with the vehicle cranking over recently. Got into my car turned the ignition and click, nothing happened. Tried to crank the engine again and click! Nothing again...... My battery was my 1st thought but, my lights were bright and radio and fan were working right. So I saw a couple postings on the lexus owners club and thought I would tackle this job myself. This problem was intermittent, sometimes the car turned over and sometimes it didn't. Recently it would take me up to 10 minutes for the car to crank over and start, so I had to do something. I just finished up the job in about 2 hours (start to finish) and thought somebody might read this and make it useful. So here I go to try and tell you how to fix the starter problem and tell you what tools you'll need. Actually after doing the job it was well worth the effort. The problem turned out to be the "Copper Contacts inside the Starter Solenoid" with a total bill of $5.00 (yep I said Five Dollars if you do it yourself). Before you begin, locate your local Alternator/Starter Rebuilding Shop, you'll need them for the Copper Contacts that are located inside the Starter Solenoid ($5.Dollars) They sold them to me separately. Tools required: Patience, 10mm., 12mm.,14mm.,15mm,16mm socket, socket wrench, universal swivel socket attachment, (2) Extra Long Socket Extensions 12"inches each, 9/32"nds nut runner or socket. So here we go: Step by step 1st Things First - you'll need to disconnect your battery to the car both positive and negative leads. Pop your hood. You need a 10 mm. socket and socket wrench to disconnect the battery. (Remember, you'll lose all your settings on your radio, seat memory etc.... but worth it - and if you have any warning light on your dash, like check engine light they'll go off too after you disconnect and reconnect the battery.) The starter and solenoid are located on the driver side of the car engine. They are piggybacked next to each other in one unit. 2nd - you need to disconnect the transmission dip stick to move it out of your way to get the starter out. (You'll need a 12mm. socket with socket wrench) The bolt is located at the top of the dip stick that is attached to the engine. Feel free to pull the dip stick all the way out and put it in a safe place. You don't actually need to take the outside shell of the dip stick out all the way just pull it out about 4 inches and move it to the right or left, it's attached at the bottom by a rubber wire holding clamp. Just move it aside for now. 3rd - Disconnect the lead wires that are going to the starter, there are two - one is a black push connector that you must push the center button in to remove the wire connector as you pull the wire out, and the other is under the rubber black boot that is the power connection that is coming from your battery. Pull back the black rubber boot and expose the 12 mm. nut that must be removed to get the cable off the starter. You'll need a 12mm. socket and wrench to get this nut off. Once you remove the cable put the 12mm. nut back on the starter so it doen't get lost. 4th - Crawl under your vehicle and take your 14 mm. socket, socket wrench and swivel adapter with you with (2) Extra Long 12" inch extentions, you'll need the extra lengths to get the bolts to turn and free your rachet up to swing and loosen the 14mm. bolt heads. Don't take the bolts out all the way, leave them in housing as long as the starter is able to come out. The only reason I say this is because the starter will be easier to re-install once your done fixing it. Now, take your starter out from the bottom, it's a little tight but it will come out. 5th - Put your starter on a work bench or preferably a Vice to hold the starter in place so it won't fall. Locate the (3) 9/32" inch cover nuts and remove them with a 9/32" inch nut runner or socket. Take care not to lose the nuts. Remove the top cover of the solenoid. Once you remove the top cover you'll see the two copper contacts on opposite sides of the solenoid. Remove the center copper solenoid, be careful because at the bottom of the solenoid is a pointed tip with a long 3" spring that actually pushed the started gear out once powered on with your ignition key. Put this center solenoid off to the side with the 3" Spring. Now locate the two copper contacts on opposite sides of the solenoid housing (these are the contacts that need to be replaced.. these are the parts that are causing all your problems with your starter - all for $5 Bucks, notice how black and pitted the copper contacts are). At this point this is where I actually took my whole starter to a Alternator/Starter Rebuildng Shop in a plastic bag with the solenoid cover off and showed them the starter and contacts and they had them in stock. (The 2 Copper Contacts) were tiny copper 90 degree clips with a 1/4 Moon Shape to them, no larger than 1 1/2"inches and no bigger than a quarter. Once I got the Copper Contacts back home the fun started! I can't believe how little they were and how easy they were going to be replaced for just $5. Five bucks. This was going to save me a ton of money. Now this is where you'll need to take the (2) nuts off the one side of the solenoid, one nut (12 mm.) is where we originally removed the cable wire from the battery and there is another nut that holds the copper contact into place. I think this is a 15mm. socket (but don't quote me on this one - sorry I forgot what size it was), but remove this nut also, this is the last nut holding the copper contact into place. Once you remove the nut you'll be able to slide the copper contact out, but be careful not to lose the thin washer and small rubber O-Ring attached to the Copper Contact Post. One side of the contact is a Rectangular Copper Square attached to a Copper Post the Copper Contact actually slides over the post for mounting purposes. Take note how the contact is positioned because you'll have to re-install the NEW Copper Contact the same way. You can remove the contact now. Make sure you note what Copper Contact goes where, one is larger than the other. Replace the contact with the same NEW COPPER CONTACT and re-install the same way. Now on the opposite side, slide back the rubber boot that is covering the other contact post bolt and nuts. Be careful because their is another small washer and "O-Ring" on the other side too. Take care to remove the Copper Contacts the same way and install the other NEW COPPER CONTACT and re-install the same way. Re-assemble the Nuts in the same manner and tighten. Slide the boot cover back over the post and re-assemble putting the center solenoid back inside the housing, re-install the cover of the solenoid. Your starter solenoid is now complete. Re-assemble everything is reverse order and now your done. Hope this helps the Do-It-Yourself Guys. Any questions, feel free to comment me back. Hope I didn't miss anything.... Blaise
  33. 1 point
    Oh wow! a fascinating country to visit....make sure you post up some photos, especially if you visit the Lexus factory
  34. 1 point
    Nice! Thought maybe I should share some more recent pics of my RX, the bumper and skid plates are still a work in progress.
  35. 1 point
    Now you can see how the wheel spacers will give you the extra tire clearance at the perch. I want to say with the 2" spacers on mine it puts the edge of the tire somewhere right at the outside edge of the perch. I could have fit larger tires but went smaller and should probably go to smaller spacers like 1" to 1.5" to fix the edge of my tire hitting the top of the fender when bottoming out.
  36. 1 point
    Yeah, the very inside of the back tires will rub pretty easily on the spring perch if you're not careful with your tire size, especially with a more square tire tread. looks like your current tires are pretty rounded on the inside... the fronts can fit whatever pretty easily.
  37. 1 point
    The rx400h has rear struts, the 450h has the spring and shocks
  38. 1 point
    I think you're stuck with 235/65r17's as your biggest, I had the next gen 235/55r19's and they would sometimes rub going around corners. I can only fit 265/70r17 cause I put 2012 highlander rear struts in it. That leaves you just over 29".
  39. 1 point
    The world of lifting RX vehicles is still pretty small so there aren't exactly any definitive guides but like any other strutted vehicle the same limitations in tire/wheel fitment would apply. The first limitation on my 300 was the rear spring perches because they are squattier than the fronts. Side clearance of the spring perch will limit how tall and wide of a tire you can fit without modification or for a certain offset/spacer. The next limitation for me was rubbing when turned full clock, not acceptable to me and I was able to fit mine with no rubbing. The taller and wider the tire the turning clearance is greatly reduced, its geometry but you can figure it out with a straight edge. Clock the wheels and take a straight edge across the inside sidewalls to the nearest obstruction and you can measure how much taller of a tire will fit without rubbing but leave some cushion. The closest point of the tire should be at the horizontal axis of the tire but make sure you look at fender clearances as well. Just take your time and measure everything until you are absolutely sure your fitment is what you want. You could also likely take it to a custom shop and they should be able to measure or use a jig to tell you what you can and can't fit. I would not recommend bringing the tire tread up past the bottom of the spring perch. If you do and you do not have ample clearances you can easily slash your sidewalls. If you are sticking with stock suspension the steering changes shouldn't be as drastic but just be ready for it to handle differently. I have not had to trim anything for mine and do not have anything rub except when I have 300-400 extra pounds in it and the suspension takes a really hard hit, mostly the rear where the outside tread just catches the lip of the fender. I need a little more travel or slightly stiffer springs in the rear. I think I am also running a larger wheel spacer than necessary (2"). Same thing for the front but don't hit the fender lip unless it is a really really hard suspension hit and I am turning. There is enough travel and clearance in the front if I am going straight over that really hard hit. I do not rub on the inside of the tire when turning but it is the outside front of the tire that hits the fender liner. That is only because it was a cheap aftermarket liner I was in a hurry to get in there to get some protection for my trans cooler before a trip. I had to cut the vents into the plastic and they puckered out into the wheel well so the tire catches them. I need to reinstall it so it fits correctly and likely make a little aluminum plate/grill for the vent slots so that doesn't happen. ***Edit- Brickwall says you have springs and shocks on the rear of yours and not a strut so that makes it a lot easier. You are then pretty much limited by the strut and turning clearance of the front then,
  40. 1 point
    I will put an end to this mystery..... these are the trim finish panels that fit the "hole" in all 4 doors, you cant see them, but your fingers feel them when you use the opening to close the door.... they seem to fit 95-2000
  41. 1 point
  42. 1 point
    Hey all! First post here, so I accidentally purchased this incredible 1998 LS 400 with 54K original miles. This isn't exactly a for sale ad, as I'm sure you'd all be happy to take a look at my new car - HOWEVER, the purchase was technically a mistake... Seeing as this was purchased sight unseen - I'm pretty happy with it's incredible condition! It is a California car, now in North Jersey and the timing belt was done at 48K miles.
  43. 1 point
    Sweet ride. I bought mine earlier this year with 234,000 miles and it was still a steal. I love my car. My GF named her "Lady Pearl." Changed the Timing Belt, had paint correction done, repaired an outer tie rod and not much more. If you decide to keep it, it should serve you well. Paul
  44. 1 point
    I sure hope nobody followed this advice for adding lube to the studs. What can require 55 ft-lb torque dry, only needs 30 ft-lb lubed. This is at least 80% over torqued condition. You can seriously over stress the threads and the studs and/or nuts will fail! The torqued values given are from the manufacturer are for dry conditions. Do not modify this for your own safety. Two degrees in Mechanical Engineering and a career in machine designing gives me the qualifications for these statements.
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
    bacosta007, Two possible problems come to mind. The head unit amplifier for those speaker channels has quit working, or ... the connector on the back of the head unit has come loose and is not making contact. If you are a DIYer with car tear down and audio experience, pull the head unit and disconnect the wiring harnesses to it (disconnect the battery first, after copying down the frequencies of all your radio presets). It might be just that simple to correct. If that doesn't correct the issue, check with a Lexus dealership to see if they have an exchange program for the head unit. Years ago (1986 I believe) I had a radio issue with my wife's Toyota Cressida. Toyota had and exchange program where you gave them the old radio to refurbish and they gave you a refurbished unit to replace it with for like $350 or so (long time ago and the details are fuzzy). Maybe Lexus has something similar? Worth checking. Good Luck!
  47. 1 point
    I just purchased a white and beige interior 1996 Lexus LS 400 that belonged to an old lady that never drove it practically. The car was purchased with 9,547 original miles. It is still under 10,000 miles The car looks like it just came out from dealership and still smells new
  48. 1 point
    I think it is pretty cheap when a corporation such as Toyota stops furnishing repair manuals. Once again big corporations don't care about us little people
  49. 1 point
    This was requested by a member in another thread. Another member responded that this would be difficult to do because everyone uses different products and he is right. But in all honesty there really is a set sequence of steps that are done when you detail properly. There is some variance in product usage, but not in the technique. First of all I'm going to mention several different possibilities of products used for each step. You'll notice that most of these products are professional grade and probably will have to be ordered online. That is because in my experience the consumer products are just that, designed for consumers who don't know or care about having the best finish possible. Professional grade products give the experienced hobbyist and professional detailer greater control over what is being done with the paint. Here are the ESSENTIALS you will NEED these to get started. -Several Microfiber towels, I say 6, 3 small 3 big. I reccomend them from our site www.lexuscarcare.com or www.pakshak.com. MF will be mush less prone to scratch than cotton. -Several 100% cotton bath towels, 3 or so. These will be used folded up to work in swirl removers and polish because they have more "bite" than MF. MF will be used for removal. -Several foam and MF applicators, you can get these where you get the towels. -Eagle one Tire Swipes for spplying dressing to tires -A semi stiff brush for tires and wheel wells -2 nice 5 gallon buckets -Some sort of paint cleaner like Meguiars #9, #82 Swirl Free Polish, 1Z Paint Polishes (which work very well by hand) -Some sort of polish like Meguiars #7, P21S Gloss Enhancing Paintwork Cleanser, #81 Hand Polish from Meguiars. -Some sort of wax. We're following a carnuaba/hybrid system here as thats whats best to use if you're only working by hand. So something like Meguiars #26 Tech Wax paste, P21S, or Meguiars NXT, Poorboys EX or EX-P, Blackfire woul\d work well -Glass cleaner- I reccomend Eagle One's 20/20. -An all purpose cleaner like 1Z Cockpit Premium for the interior plastic and carpeting with a nice soft brush. -Woolite and water dilluted 5:1 for leather -A good tire dressing for the tires and the wheel wells after they are washed. Things that would be NICE: -A Porter Cable dual action polisher with 2 cutting pads, 2 polishing pads, and 1 finishing pad. Its tempting to buy a cheaper buffer from Sears or Pepboys or something but trust me when I tell you, if you want the best and safest results the PC is worth the investment. Cheap buffers (Waxxpro, Craftsman) have weak motors that bog down and cumbersome bonnet type systems that either remove too much or not enough paint. If you're gonna spend the bucks anyways, spend twice as much and get the right tool for the job. -A higher cut compound for real swirl removal with the PC like Meguiars #83 Dual Action Cleaner Polish, Poorboys SSR2, Menzerna Intensive Polish -A Bissel Little Green Clean Machine for cleaning carpeting -Plexus plastic polish for all clear plastic -Clay (ClayMagic or Mothers) First clean the interior. Spray the all purpose cleaner on all plastic parts, agitate with the soft brush and wipe clean, use the woolite on the seats and wipe off with a damp towel. Vacuum the carpets well and spray the cleaner and agitate of needed. Pay attention to the nooks and crannys! Always do the interior first so you dont get dust on clean paint. Now, nextthing to do is wash with a good carwash using a good Microfiber, Chenile or Lanswool mitt. Use two buckets, one with soapy water and one with clean for rinsing the mitt after each pass. Wash in straight lines only, never touch the paint in circles. Wash from the top down then do the wheels last as that is where the most grime is, you don't want to drag that up onto the paint. If its hot rinse each panel after washing it. Dont forget to scrub the wheel wells! Next if you have the clay, clay now. Resoap each panel, clay, rinse until the whole car and the windows are done. Now dry the car using your MF towels, use two towels again in straight lines until the car is dry. Now, dress the wheel wells by spraying the protectant up inside them, then spray the protectant on the tire swipe and do the tires. I always do this before the next steps so it doesn't leave overspray on the car. Now its time to start detailing! If you have moderate to heavy swirls and you have the PC start with it, the DACP and a cutting pad, only work 2'x2' sections at a time. Don't use too much DACP, 3-4 dime sized drops a panel is plenty. Make each section look its best before moving on. Use the PC at high speed (5 or 6) and use random overlapping strokes with moderate pressure until the product almost dissapears. The swirls will come out it just may take time. This stage could take hours so be ready for that but the results are worth it. Work your way around the car, when it stops working as well swap out the pad for a clean cutting pad thats why you have two. If the swirls aren't bad use DACP with a polishing pad instead in the same way. If working by hand fold up one of the terry towels into 8ths, apply the #9 or #82 and work into the paint using moderate pressure. Again work 2x2 sections until almost clean and make each section look its best before moving on. This will not remove all swirls but thats left to later steps to hide. If you used the DACP and a cutting pad then you need to go around with DACP and #9 or #82 and a polishing pad afterwards as DACP and a cutting pad will leave micromarring behind. Next, polishing! If you have the buffer use a clean polishing pad and your polish of choice, use it like the DACP but you don't have to work it as long. If by hand same deal, fold up a terry towel and go to town. Now, stand back and admire the work. The paint should be perfect now, no swirls, smooth as glass, good proper color. This is where you look for areas of problems and do them again until it looks right. Now comes the waxing! You can wax by hand or by PC with the finishing pad. Use straight lines and put down a thin coat. Wait depending on the instructions on the wax then buff off IN STRAIGHT lines with an MF towel. Layer and add coats as you see fit. Don't forget to wax the wheels. Next is windows. Get your 20/20 and some paper towels, and newspaper. Spray the 20/20 on the paper towel until its soaked, then scrub it into the window. Next, wipe clean with the newspaper, inside and out all the way around. You can now wax the windows if you'd like but its not neccisary. Now thats it, you're done, sit back and admire your work. Watch for missed patches of wax and wax stuck in creases and crevices. Congratulations!
  50. 0 points
    Hello Lexus Forum, Recently I started to hear this high pitch noise coming from engine bay driver side and the car feels a bit sluggish. NO CODES or MIL light on dash. Car is a 2007 AWD and has 66K . Any input greatly appreciated.



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