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Turn My Rotors?


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When I had my snow tires removed this weekend I learned that I need rear brakes done. Pads and turning rotors at the dealer is $350 (scam?). When I did my own visual inspection I ran my thumbnail across the rotor and it felt very smooth. Also, my car stops straight as an arrow with no pulling or pedal pulsing. Do I need my rotors turned? While I can see some lines on them, they feel smooth. Can I just do a "pad slap?"

thanks!

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When I had my snow tires removed this weekend I learned that I need rear brakes done.  Pads and turning rotors at the dealer is $350 (scam?).  When I did my own visual inspection I ran my thumbnail across the rotor and it felt very smooth.  Also, my car stops straight as an arrow with no pulling or pedal pulsing.  Do I need my rotors turned?  While I can see some lines on them, they feel smooth.  Can I just do a "pad slap?"

thanks!

I have ALWAYS repaired my own brakes for many years and I ALWAYS have the rotors turned. It is best to install new pads with rotors as smooth as possible. With that being said, NOT all brake technicians are trained properly the set up the machine that rotor lathe. DO NOT let the dealer do the job. Investigate your area to find the best deal. B)

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Turn your rotors. Any current deposits that are on the rotors...are only magnified once you perform your break-in process w/ the new pads.

You want a "clean/fresh" surface for your brake pads.

Also, have your rotors turned elsewhere...not the dealer. The machine that turns the rotor is nothing special. A local NAPA auto parts store can turn them.

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Yes you can probably just install new pads. Just make sure they are Toyota pads to maximize rotor life.

The 1997 Toyota Brake Systems Technician Training Manual does not recommend turning rotors unless the rotors are worn beyond the minimum thickness spec or if the vehicle is exhibiting symptoms of rotor untrueness like vibration when braking.

I have a '92 Toyota pickup with 454,600 miles and have never turned or replaced the rotors and the rotors are still only 25% worn http://www.saber.net/~monarch/rotorthick.jpg. This is an extreme case of rotor durability (made possible by a combination of mostly highway driving, gentle braking habits, use of genuine Toyota pads and a manual transmission which is easier on brakes) but does prove that turning rotors can be a waste of time and money and that it just grinds away potential life off the rotors.

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When I had my snow tires removed this weekend I learned that I need rear brakes done.  Pads and turning rotors at the dealer is $350 (scam?).  When I did my own visual inspection I ran my thumbnail across the rotor and it felt very smooth.  Also, my car stops straight as an arrow with no pulling or pedal pulsing.  Do I need my rotors turned?  While I can see some lines on them, they feel smooth.  Can I just do a "pad slap?"

thanks!

I took my new Lex to the dealership to replace the front pads, and they told me the rotors need to be turned. First bad decision was paying 70 for the front oem pads. They wanted 160 for labor. That was completely ridiculous. I found a local tire store that comes highly recommended and he only chared 70. Big diffy eh?

Lesson learned - there is always a better shop that will do it cheaper. Make sure it is someone you trust.

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If you would have searched you would have found that most shops will always turn the rotors, this is to minimize comeback and othe problems, so they do it with out question, whether it needs it or not. You can probably get away without doing it, depending on the rotors and just installing new pads. <_<

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If you have no vibration when braking, and the rotor surface is that produced by the pad material and not metal to metal (like you ran the pads down to nothing), then simply install new pads. There is no need to turn rotors which are smooth and have no run-out. The new pads will bed in perfectly well to the rotor surface. Turning is done to correct a run out condition, and as it removes material, the rotor has less mass to act as a heat sink. Therefore it may warp even faster. Of course many rotors are warped because the calipers are sticking, either on the sliders or at the piston. So those who turn the rotors are treating the symptom, not the true cause of the problem.

If there is no problem, then just install the pads.

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If you have no vibration when braking, and the rotor surface is that produced by the pad material and not metal to metal (like you ran the pads down to nothing), then simply install new pads.  There is no need to turn rotors which are smooth and have no run-out.  The new pads will bed in perfectly well to the rotor surface.  Turning is done to correct a run out condition, and as it removes material, the rotor has less mass to act as a heat sink.  Therefore it may warp even faster.  Of course many rotors are warped because the calipers are sticking, either on the sliders or at the piston.  So those who turn the rotors are treating the symptom, not the true cause of the problem. 

If there is no problem, then just install the pads.

What he said :)

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Do not go to a dealer to do you brakes. They rip you off. It is so easy to the brakes. It is recommended that you get the rotors cut every time you put on new pads, but every other time is OK too.

However, go to a local autoparts store and find out if they cut rotors. I know a bunch of places around me cut rotor for $10 each. It takes about an hour to do both.

I also recommend AXXIS brake pads.

Last spring I put on cross drilled slotted rotors on my car with AXXIS brake pads. Within one year maybe 1/3 of the pads wore off. And I drive my car hard.

I got the BRADI rotors with AXXIS brake pads for the front for less than $200 on ebay.

If you get new rotors get them with the zinc plated finish. It's only $10 difference, but they dont get that rusty look after rain.

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It is recommended that you get the rotors cut every time you put on new pads, but every other time is OK too. 

However, go to a local autoparts store and find out if they cut rotors.  I know a bunch of places around me cut rotor for $10 each.  It takes about an hour to do both. 

Who recommends this? Anyone important?

As to going to some autoparts store so some seventeen year old high school dropout can turn my rotors on a thiry year old machine he doesn't understand, I don't think so. Ten bucks to turn a rotor? I guess you get what you pay for.

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