Jump to content

Block Heater


Phil M.M.

Recommended Posts

I would like to have a block heater installed in my 1996 ls400-weather is getting colder in New Brunswick Canada these days.

would anyone know a part no. or where to get one of the element type that install in a "frost plug".

Is it a complicated installation with potential leakage problems?

Thanks much ,Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your best bet would be to call a Canadian Lexus dealer. Block heaters for the LS aren't available here in the U.S. but I found that the part was very inexpensive when I checked with a dealer in B.C. some years back.

I think the part price is the same for all Lexus models but the installation cost charged by dealers varies widely by model. I remember that the installed price for my LS400 was fairly low so that might indicate that installing the block heater on an LS400 is easier than on other models.

Here is a thread about someone in Ontario installing a block heater on his Toyota Hybrid ... he paid only C$46 for the block heater -- there is a link to another forum that has photos: http://us.lexusownersclub.com/forums/index...showtopic=60576

His block heater looks like the one for the LS400 but maybe they all look or are the same.

I've seen complaints on forums that Toyota/Lexus block heaters are not as effective as those sold for other makes of cars -- apparently because the Toyota/Lexus block heater is "only" 400 watts.

You can see block heaters and installed retail prices for almost all current Canadian spec Lexus models at http://www.lexus.ca/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to have a block heater installed in my 1996 ls400-weather is getting colder in New Brunswick Canada these days.

would anyone know a part no. or where to get one of the element type that install in a "frost plug".

Is it a complicated installation with potential leakage problems?

Thanks much ,Phil

Unless it gets to below -40C, just keeping the batt charged up and switching to a lighter oil should take you throught the winter with no probs. Potential for leaks etc, with a coolant heater would be a deal breaker for me. I'd get a batt warmer before a block heater.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to have a block heater installed in my 1996 ls400-weather is getting colder in New Brunswick Canada these days.

would anyone know a part no. or where to get one of the element type that install in a "frost plug".

Is it a complicated installation with potential leakage problems?

Thanks much ,Phil

Unless it gets to below -40C, just keeping the batt charged up and switching to a lighter oil should take you throught the winter with no probs. Potential for leaks etc, with a coolant heater would be a deal breaker for me. I'd get a batt warmer before a block heater.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless it gets to below -40C, just keeping the batt charged up and switching to a lighter oil should take you throught the winter with no probs. Potential for leaks etc, with a coolant heater would be a deal breaker for me. I'd get a batt warmer before a block heater.

EUBT, I really don't think there is much risk of a Toyota/Lexus block heater leaking. These things install very securely and are extremely low-tech devices. I had a block heater on a Mercedes I drove from late 1979 until I bought my first LS in 1990 and never had any problems with it. I'd even plug it in when it was fairly warm (i.e. below 32° F. in my garage at home) just so I would have instant warm air from the heater during my relatively short drive to work.

After I had the block heater installed, it seemed like AC outlets were EVERYWHERE I parked -- it didn't take much searching. I plugged in my block heater in the covered parking lot at work, in parking lots of hotels near Colorado ski areas and in the middle of Kansas, in public parking lots and relative's driveways in northern Iowa, etc., etc. OK, I was stealing a little electricity but not once did anyone ever unplug my block heater -- and I carried a 100' extension cord in the trunk that I sometimes used to plug it in pretty far away from my car.

Of course, I really needed a block heater on that Diesel Mercedes -- that was sometimes the only reason it could be started after sitting all night in the winter at 9,000 ft. elevations. Toyota/Lexus V8 engines warm up pretty fast compared to a 1970's Mercedes Diesel engine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to have a block heater installed in my 1996 ls400-weather is getting colder in New Brunswick Canada these days.

would anyone know a part no. or where to get one of the element type that install in a "frost plug".

Is it a complicated installation with potential leakage problems?

Thanks much ,Phil

Unless it gets to below -40C, just keeping the batt charged up and switching to a lighter oil should take you throught the winter with no probs. Potential for leaks etc, with a coolant heater would be a deal breaker for me. I'd get a batt warmer before a block heater.

I have switched to 5-30 mobil 1 synthetic oil which seems to help -

Yes the potential for leaks is a concern -Thanks much !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless it gets to below -40C, just keeping the batt charged up and switching to a lighter oil should take you throught the winter with no probs. Potential for leaks etc, with a coolant heater would be a deal breaker for me. I'd get a batt warmer before a block heater.

EUBT, I really don't think there is much risk of a Toyota/Lexus block heater leaking. These things install very security and are extremely low-tech devices. I had a block heater on a Mercedes I drove from late 1979 until I bought my first LS in 1990 and never had any problems with it. I'd even plug it in when it was fairly warm (i.e. below 32° F. in my garage at home) just so I would have instant warm air from the heater during my relatively short drive to work.

After I had the block heater installed, it seemed like AC outlets were EVERYWHERE I parked -- it didn't take much searching. I plugged in my block heater in the covered parking lot at work, in parking lots of hotels near Colorado ski areas and in the middle of Kansas, in public parking lots and relative's driveways in northern Iowa, etc., etc. OK, I was stealing a little electricity but not once did anyone ever unplug my block heater -- and I carried a 100' extension cord in the trunk that I sometimes used to plug it in pretty far away from my car.

Of course, I really needed a block heater on that Diesel Mercedes -- that was sometimes the only reason it could be started after sitting all night in the winter at 9,000 ft. elevations. Toyota/Lexus V8 engines warm up pretty fast compared to a 1970's Mercedes Diesel engine.

Thanks Jim !

I also worry about slow oil circulation and wear on start up in very cold weather.

Your tip re. carrying a long extention cord in the trunk is a great one ,. I will check out your link .

Take care !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless it gets to below -40C, just keeping the batt charged up and switching to a lighter oil should take you throught the winter with no probs. Potential for leaks etc, with a coolant heater would be a deal breaker for me. I'd get a batt warmer before a block heater.

EUBT, I really don't think there is much risk of a Toyota/Lexus block heater leaking. These things install very security and are extremely low-tech devices. I had a block heater on a Mercedes I drove from late 1979 until I bought my first LS in 1990 and never had any problems with it. I'd even plug it in when it was fairly warm (i.e. below 32° F. in my garage at home) just so I would have instant warm air from the heater during my relatively short drive to work.

After I had the block heater installed, it seemed like AC outlets were EVERYWHERE I parked -- it didn't take much searching. I plugged in my block heater in the covered parking lot at work, in parking lots of hotels near Colorado ski areas and in the middle of Kansas, in public parking lots and relative's driveways in northern Iowa, etc., etc. OK, I was stealing a little electricity but not once did anyone ever unplug my block heater -- and I carried a 100' extension cord in the trunk that I sometimes used to plug it in pretty far away from my car.

Of course, I really needed a block heater on that Diesel Mercedes -- that was sometimes the only reason it could be started after sitting all night in the winter at 9,000 ft. elevations. Toyota/Lexus V8 engines warm up pretty fast compared to a 1970's Mercedes Diesel engine.

lol I'm not sure I'd go skiing up north for a wknd in a diesel. I hear ya about low tech, just saying from experience. Have one in my volvo. Leaks while driving. No coolant pools in the garage so I can't be bothered to fix it. Ripped the plug right off the cord one time when I forgot to unplug it before taking off. Later, plastic plug cover cracked same night the dash cracked while at Mt Tremblant in Quebec (-42 without the wind chill). Salt started corroding the plug, so I wrapped in up in a plastic bag. All that slushy crap from the road gets frozen and caked on the bag. Even before the cover cracked, it was always too dirty or frozen for nice leather gloves or a bare hand to easily remove before plugging in. Made for a messy affair to use, so I don't use it anymore. It did warm up the car quicker though. The batt warmer I have on it now gives me just about the same cranking I got before the cold weather. That, winter oil, coolant topped up, and some gas line antifreeze for really cold spells, and I say "let'r blow, I'm ready".

Just to be fair, although the dealer installed the block heater, I don't think it was a high quality unit and it certainly warmed up the car in no time. I'm also inclined to agree w 1990 that a Lexus dealer would use a better quality heater.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

lol I'm not sure I'd go skiing up north for a wknd in a diesel.

No kidding! Diesel fuel probably wouldn't flow at all at -42 Celsius or Fahrenheit. I got so freaking tired of mixing kerosene or regular gas with diesel fuel to keep the Mercedes running in winter and it was way worse at high altitudes.

I hear ya about low tech, just saying from experience. Have one in my volvo. Leaks while driving.

Well, it is a Volvo after all. I actually bought three Volvos in the same year and owned them concurrently: A used 1972 P1800E, a used 145 wagon and a brand new 1978 Volvo 242 "SRO". I was not all amused by Volvo quality and sold them all within the same year -- didn't have any idea what I was getting into. One of my main gripe with Volvos way back then (other than interior parts flying apart) was that they got around so poorly in heavy snow -- crap, these cars are made in Sweden where they get lots of snow! What's up with that? ... probably a good thing Volvo went with FWD and AWD as time progressed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Create New...

Forums


News


Membership