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Daizen Bushing Experiences


lex4me
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I am in the very slow process of replacing my front suspension on my 91 LS. As a small part of this project, I purchased a pair of new upper control arms from irontoad. The new arms came with new bushings. I had separately purchased a set of Daizen upper and lower control arm bushings ($99 for both sides, BTW - not bad at all...). I have already installed the lower bushings to replace my old ones, but am at an impass on the upper. Does anyone have direct experience with the Daizen bushings? I am concerned that I am going to have perfectly good (albeit OEM rubber) bushings pressed out in order for me to install the Daizen ones and find out that the car has lost all of its luxury ride. I don't mind a bit more tightness, but I definitely am not looking for it to become a track car. What I would really be after is an OEM or slightly firmer ride that would not degrade over time as the bushings wear out and is completely quiet. Any and all thoughts most appreciated. I do not want to have to tear into this again.

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JZZ,

Bushings are not like play plain rubbers. They precisely designed and no movement is allowed. Secondly, your old bushings been there for over a 10 years and its not easy to get it out. Press in and press out is out of the question. You will need a special tool for that and 99.9% of shops dont have that. You will destroy the old bushings when installing the new. Here is a full instruction on DIY Daizen Bushing Installation

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I am indeed finding trouble locating a machine shop that can press out the old (new) upper control arm bushings. Everywhere I have gone, all they have is the same ball joint press that I already have with no sleeves thin enough and of the proper diameter to press the OEM bushing out. I think I will leave the new OEM bushings in the upper control arm and just hang on to the Daizen ones if the OEM ones go south while I still own the car, unless someone knows of a source that has fabricated a sleeve of the proper diameter to press the OE bushing out without damaging it. It just seems wrong to burn up a perfectly good and brand new bushing.

FWIW, when I replaced my lower control arm bushing, I torched the old bushings out as well, but used Goo Gone to get rid of all of the excess charred rubber that remained in the control arm. It was a messy proposition, but I didn't have to do any sanding (thereby taking the risk of messing up my tolerances) to get everything smooth. After the Goo Gone. all I did was a very, very quick pass over the internals of the control arm with the wire wheel attachment on my dremel and I was home free.

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lextreme: i think he said that he said he has new arms, so thats why i suggested that he could put the bushings back. and you dont need to destroy the bushing to remove them, but you need a special punch so it doesnt push the inner sleve. but thats hard to come by but well i had to make my punches.

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oh yea lex4me: i used a 2jaw puller and an aluminum punch that i machined to push out a rear bushing i did ( theres a tutorial in the tutorial section the pics and proceedure are on the second page.) and well you probably cant machine the punches but i think you can find some punches at a local autozone, napa, checkers/kragen...you get the idea.

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I don't have the equipment necessary to machine a punch, but I am thinking that a flat disk punch like what I noted that you machined for your rear bushing would also destroy my bushing since the center of the OE bushing extends beyond the edge of the bushing. I was thinking of checking out a local home store for some water pipe of the proper diameter to match the outside diameter of the outer bushing shell and then using the cap that comes with ball joint removal kits to place over the edge of the pipe, thereby creating an open-air space for the part of the bushing that extends beyond the center of the bushing. I would then use your idea (thanks!) of a two-jaw puller to get the OE bushing out without damage. Now the only issue is finding the proper diameter pipe. Any ideas for creating a pipe sleeve of a given diameter if I am not so lucky as to find the right diameter at the local home store?

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yea to save the bushing i would have needed to make a semi hollow center but you could already push the inner sleve out with your finger on my rear bushing so well i didnt care much for that. maybe try find a local machine shop thats willing to make you a punch its real simple to make and well they shouldnt charge you that much. just give them a simple drawing with dimentions.

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