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Uh-oh. Anti-theft Log Nuts


glenmore

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I think I'm in trouble here. My daughter left the trunk open and somebody pilfered some of the tools from the trunk kit. He/she was kind enough not to take the lug wrench but for some reason took the anti-theft lug nut key for the wheels. I can't find the original McGard packaging that had the code on it. What are my options? I'll contact McGard tomorrow and see what they can do.

Thanks,

glenmore

1990 LS400

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I think I'm in trouble here. My daughter left the trunk open and somebody pilfered some of the tools from the trunk kit. He/she was kind enough not to take the lug wrench but for some reason took the anti-theft lug nut key for the wheels. I can't find the original McGard packaging that had the code on it. What are my options? I'll contact McGard tomorrow and see what they can do.

Thanks,

glenmore

1990 LS400

When you bought the lug nuts, there was a registration card that was recommended to send back to McGard which had your info on it. If you sent it, they'll have the information. If you didn't send it, you might have to go to a garage or tire shop to have them remove your lug nuts with their master keys and you'd have to buy another set, or go back to stock nuts.

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The big tire stores have a type of carbide toothed socket that will grab the wheel locks and undo them. They're destroyed after that so new ones will be needed, but they can zip them off really quickly.

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The big tire stores have a type of carbide toothed socket that will grab the wheel locks and undo them. They're destroyed after that so new ones will be needed, but they can zip them off really quickly.

So much for anti theft nuts! :whistles:

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I always use an impact socket slightly smaller than the locking nut, hammer it on to the nut, then remove it. Working at a shop you have to figure people always loose their keys and when buying salvage cars the keys are always somewhere else besides in the car.

Works fine, but as mentioned you will have to replace it once removed.

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I think I'm in trouble here. My daughter left the trunk open and somebody pilfered some of the tools from the trunk kit. He/she was kind enough not to take the lug wrench but for some reason took the anti-theft lug nut key for the wheels. I can't find the original McGard packaging that had the code on it. What are my options? I'll contact McGard tomorrow and see what they can do.

Thanks,

glenmore

1990 LS400

I once had the same problem, mcGard told me to take a picture of the lugnut and they could reproduce the key.

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Thank you for all for the different suggestions for removing locks. I thought mine were McGard but turns out they are some long forgotten brand so getting a new key was out. McGard only made an old model with 8 splines. Mine had seven. The sacrificial 12 pt socket or a tool like the Craftsman Bolt-Out works best with a spline lock. I went with the Craftsman tool kit for $20. The first one took several tries before I finally got the hang of it. It takes pounding with a hammer in a rocking pattern to get it to seat and then slow pressure from your breaker bar is all it takes. Just repeat if it fails to grab. A good reminder to always torque your lug nuts particularly after you've been to a shop. I would have had a hell of a time if some shop torqued them a lot more. Another tip, using a torque wrench, tighten all the nuts an extra 5-8 lbs except for the lock nut, thereby easing the pressure on the lock nut. In extreme cases, weld a bolt or nut to the lock nut. Another last ditch method if nothing else works: remove all nuts. raise wheel, spin the wheel so the lock nut is at 3 o'clock position. apply brake and lower car so some weight is applied to the tire. raise car, spin lock nut to 9 o'clock position and repeat. The rocking and the pressure will loosen the lock nut. This method results in no damage to the wheel and may be the last resort if the nuts are deeply recessed, or you have no access to tools.

glenmore

1990 LS400

1991 300CE

2000 C280

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