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2006 Gs Transmission Issue


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In reading some posts here, I have noticed in previous models (mainly ES (mid to late 90's)) that the transmission would fail to immediately engage when accelerating from 40 MPH on up. I recently test drove the new 2006 GS300. When I stomped on the brakes, and then immediately tried to accelerate (rapidly) the transmission failed to engage. Approximately 1/2 to 1 second later, the transmission slammed violently into gear, causing the back tires to spin. I have searched this site, but cannot find an explanation for this. Anyone with feedback? Thanks.

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In my old 3 Series, I used to joke about making a sandwich and getting a drink while we were waiting to pick a gear.

It seems to happen in many cars these days, most discernable in those with more electronics, VSC, etc.

We have to keep in mind the purpose the designers had in mind when making these cars. Just like when driving in winter mode, the accelleration commands of the driver are taken "lightly" by the ECU in order not to spin the wheels. If you kick it down hard enough, the ECU seems to think, ""well, ok." "This guy wants to go, even though I know it's too slippery. Well, ok then. We'll go."" A second or two or three later you're on your way.

In "normal" mode, I personally think there should be "0" delay from the time my #10 hits the floor to the time the throttle snaps wide open. This just isn't theoretically possible when the ECU has to monitor and decide on so many things.

First it likes to leave the transmission in the gear it's in to avoid shifting. That makes for a smoother ride. If the transmission was just previously upshifted because of "stomping on the brakes" the ECU will be expecting you to keep slowing down. Now you put the hammer down immediately, the ECU thinks "oh *BLEEP*, I thought he was going to slow down."

Now, the hammer goes down. First the ECu commands the throttle motor open. The VSS tells the ECU "we're not accellerating fast enough." The ECU (while monitoring literally hundreds of other things) has to decide to downshift.

If you drive around geezer style, in any Lexus, you will almost never notice anything abrupt. Everything will be smooth and supple. If you pound the *BLEEP* out of it, it will react in a more harky-jerky manner. That's not to say these cars don't perform. They just have their own way of doing it and the driver has to be responsible and recognize how to drive them.

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In my old 3 Series, I used to joke about making a sandwich and getting a drink while we were waiting to pick a gear.

It seems to happen in many cars these days, most discernable in those with more electronics, VSC, etc.

We have to keep in mind the purpose the designers had in mind when making these cars. Just like when driving in winter mode, the accelleration commands of the driver are taken "lightly" by the ECU in order not to spin the wheels. If you kick it down hard enough, the ECU seems to think, ""well, ok." "This guy wants to go, even though I know it's too slippery. Well, ok then. We'll go."" A second or two or three later you're on your way.

In "normal" mode, I personally think there should be "0" delay from the time my #10 hits the floor to the time the throttle snaps wide open. This just isn't theoretically possible when the ECU has to monitor and decide on so many things.

First it likes to leave the transmission in the gear it's in to avoid shifting. That makes for a smoother ride. If the transmission was just previously upshifted because of "stomping on the brakes" the ECU will be expecting you to keep slowing down. Now you put the hammer down immediately, the ECU thinks "oh *BLEEP*, I thought he was going to slow down."

Now, the hammer goes down. First the ECu commands the throttle motor open. The VSS tells the ECU "we're not accellerating fast enough." The ECU (while monitoring literally hundreds of other things) has to decide to downshift.

If you drive around geezer style, in any Lexus, you will almost never notice anything abrupt. Everything will be smooth and supple. If you pound the *BLEEP* out of it, it will react in a more harky-jerky manner. That's not to say these cars don't perform. They just have their own way of doing it and the driver has to be responsible and recognize how to drive them.

I could not have said it better myself , Excellent !!!

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Yesterday we traded our '04 RX330 in on a '06 GS300 and love this Lexus. I didn't like the performance of the RX transmission for reasons noted in other posts. During our test-drive, I did the rolling stop manuever. This would put the RX into a hesitation while determining the correct gear but the GS went like it should. No issues with this transmission. The manual shift automatic is enjoyable to use.

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