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lexis lexus

Setting Camshafts 1Mzfe

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I think my cams weren't put back in right (don't ask me...) and engine not at tdc now. Anybody know how to put the cams back on correctly, and then spin them to the right position once the crank is at tdc?

LL

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I think my cams weren't put back in right (don't ask me...) and engine not at tdc now. Anybody know how to put the cams back on correctly, and then spin them to the right position once the crank is at tdc?

LL

Will this help?

post-26724-0-71067400-1292738436_thumb.j

post-26724-0-95246600-1292738464_thumb.j

post-26724-0-94595300-1292738477_thumb.j

post-26724-0-06472300-1292738491_thumb.j

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Lexlogic,

Thanks for the pix. I got all of that I think (recall seeing your prior posts). My prob is that when I took the cams out, the crank wasn't set in tdc, and althou I marked the cam shaft gears, pulleys, etc pretty well, when I put it back together, something wasn't right and after running for a minute roughly, the timing belt walked and shredded and it stopped, never to start again.

So my problem now is that I'm not sure the intake and exh cams were matched up correctly, not having the tdc position to use as a starting point.

I'm taking them off again, will put the crank in tdc and try to match them up, I guess by having the cams over cyl 1 fully disengaged and symmetrical, but this won't help me on the front (right) bank.

I'm hoping someone will tell me about a way to match/set/mesh the cam gears that's simple and relatively fool proof. I've read something about lining dots up on the crank gears, but only on line, w/ some debate, and not in manuals.

Thanks

LL

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Lexlogic,

Thanks for the pix. I got all of that I think (recall seeing your prior posts). My prob is that when I took the cams out, the crank wasn't set in tdc, and althou I marked the cam shaft gears, pulleys, etc pretty well, when I put it back together, something wasn't right and after running for a minute roughly, the timing belt walked and shredded and it stopped, never to start again.

So my problem now is that I'm not sure the intake and exh cams were matched up correctly, not having the tdc position to use as a starting point.

I'm taking them off again, will put the crank in tdc and try to match them up, I guess by having the cams over cyl 1 fully disengaged and symmetrical, but this won't help me on the front (right) bank.

I'm hoping someone will tell me about a way to match/set/mesh the cam gears that's simple and relatively fool proof. I've read something about lining dots up on the crank gears, but only on line, w/ some debate, and not in manuals.

Thanks

LL

SET NO.1 CYLINDER TO TDC/COMPRESSION

(a) Turn the crankshaft pulley, and align its groove with the timing mark ”0” of the No.1 timing belt cover.

(B) Check that the valve lifters on the No.1 (IN and EX) are loose. If not, turn the crankshaft 1 revolution (360°) and align the mark.

post-26724-0-36701000-1292823497_thumb.j

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Ok, I finally got an answer from a mechanic I hired to help straghten out my situation.

So the answer to my question about setting the cams is:

there are two very small dots on one of the cam gears (not the same as pulley) and one dot on the other, and you have to match them up. That's it.

Why isn't this in the manuals (not in FSM, not in haynes)? (Ranting).

Once the cams are set and as Lexlogic correctly indicated -- then it's jut a matter of lining up the marks on the cam PULLEYS w/ the marks on the rear timing cover, setting the crank for tdc and then slap on the timing belt.

Turns out both of my heads are warped so they're off to the machine shop.

LL

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If you notice on one of the picture, when you slap the timing belt "ON" a white spot tie is placed to prevent from slipping. And another tip: It is important to torque the cylinder head bolts in squence with a new head gasket everytime. I failed this task and had to re-do the head cylinder after a month. A lot of our members can learn from this post. Keep us updated!

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NEVER machine are warped aluminum cylinder head unless the warpage exceeds the allowed amount significantly. The reason is : The camshaft and bearings MUST be parallel to the crankshaft AND in a perfectly straight line. When a generic machine shop grinds off the high spots from the 'block' side to straighten it, the thickness along the head is now uneven and the distance from the crankshaft to the camshafts will be uneven along their length when the head bolts are tightened. This will, depending on where and how much metal was removed, lead to camshaft breakage and engine destruction.

To properly resurface aluminum overhead cam cylinder heads, all the valve guides and other fixtures on the top side must be removed and the TOP side resurfaced exactly parallel with the new block side. This is not done usually as it is VERY costly and time consuming--and a good used cylinder head or a factory re-manufactured one will be lower cost.

Good luck you are going to need it.

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OK, it has been awhile. I've gotten back to my 94 es300 (1mz fe) project. This is turning into a good story for those who like to wrench...

To summarize:

1. Initial problem was knock sensors. No amt of merge wiring, externally mounted sensors, etc was successful in removing the cel. In addition the care would occasionlly overheat, like every 400 miles, despite scrupulous monitoring of coolant levels, looking for leaks.

2. So I finally decided to go knock sensor diving. A busted intake bolt on the rearward head (for some rediculous reason it's called the right side...) convinced me I needed to take the heads off and replace the gaskets (toward which I was leaning due to overheating) after getting the f'd flange on the head repaired.

3. Spent a rediculous amount of time and effort in trying to put the rearward head on due to not being able to get the exh manifold-to-block cooler-EGR pipe to mate up (yes, California car....) I finally, in a fit of desparation chernobled the pipe-block connection after getting one nut on partially.

4. I reassembled everything, put all cams back with the marks I'd made, then put the top half back on (valve covers, intake manifold, plenum, throttle body)

5. Fired it up and it ran for about 30 seconds, very roughly then stopped, cranking would turn it over verrrrry slowly if at all.

Here's the rest of the story to date:

6. Hired a mobile mechanic who discovered

a) water in the oil (not previously there)due to damaged rearward head gasket (due to all the on and off required to get the EGR to almost fit), and

b)a shredded timing belt, due to not putting the positioning bolt back in the bracket holding the #2 timing belt idler pulley, causing it to veer off line, walking the timing belt off. (alright, I messed up on this one big time, but hey, it's a hobby, right?)

7. We (mech and me) went back in, took the heads off and had them planed, spent a lot of time cleaing the block surface (something I'd falied to do previously), and then bolted down the rearward head (bank 1, right side head, 1,3,5 cylinder head, whatever).

8. He and I had a bet ($5) that he could put the rearward exhaust manifold on AFTER bolting down the head. But he couldn't get the studs to thread properly while lying on his stomach on top of the block--due to the micky ficky egr pipe throwing everything off!

9. The mech then disappeared, and shortly thereafter so did I--went to St. Croix to drown my sorrow in numerous margaritas, 80 degree weather. I thought about the Lexus a few times but mostly with the rage of a man who has lost a battle but not willing to give up the war....

10. Upon returning 3 weeks ago, still no sign of the mech, so I screwed (literally) around with the rear exh manifolt, having to drop the exhaust from the front on back to the cat, in order to get enough wiggle room to get the rearward exhaust manifold + EGR pipe out. chased out the threads of all open exhaust manifold stud holes with a tap (lying on top of the engine...) and put studs in everything. then spent a rediculous amount of time trying to get the exh manifold+EGR back in and mated with all the studs I'd replaced. finally got it and started cursing and swearing at the car, telling it I'd kicked it's !Removed!.... really quite comical to see me....

11. Next I spent way too much time figuring out how to get the timing right, making it a bit more difficult than it is....

NOTE: I WAS IN ERROR ABOVE WHEN I SAID I HAD TO MATCH THE ONE DOT ON ONE CAM GEAR WITH THE TWO DOT ON THE OTHER CAM GEAR

its one dot to one dot (or if you prefer 2 dot to 2 dot) I know this cause the timing marks wouldn't line up otherwise. I was able to find TDC with the trick of using a long straw stuck thru the spark plug hole in #1 cylinder and then turning the crank shaft while watching the straw go up and down. jeez there must have been 10 marks on the crank timing gear and oil pump housing, (I didn't put them there) so one had to decide which ones to mate up, the straw trick worked well.

12. At this point the (new) belt is on, all the marks line up, and I'm getting ready to put the timing belt covers back on, moving on then to the top side (intake etc)

I'll keep every one posted.

Thanks to all above who shared their wisdom...

LL

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THE REST OF THE STORY....Ok, so I finally got it together. As I said in the prior post I put the timing belt on then the covers, then the intake with the new knock sensors, harness and coolant hose underneath. Couldn't start it at first until I realized I'd not put the maf sensor cable back on. It initially ran very roughly but as time went on it slowly got better. Discovered that the intake and plenum were prolly not tightened up enough, as spraying w/ wd 40 made it run much smoother. I swear I torqued them to spec, as I was fearful of snapping a bolt or two, but after hand tightening down the plenum to intake bolts well past spec, and doing the same w/ the accessable bolts/nuts on the intake manifold, it's been purring like a kitten.

Of course, I was not that hopeful and within the first few miles on the road, started throwing codes..... but I'll leave that for another topic.

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