Sign in to follow this  
jambie

Brake Line Bleeding For Newbies?

Recommended Posts

I want to bleed and replace all the brake fluid on my new-to-me '02 LS 430 tomorrow, as the stuff in there is pretty dark and may be factory original at 85K. I have access to a Snap-On vacuum brake bleeder that attaches to the bleeder screws and sucks out the old stuff, then draws in the new stuff when you add it at the reservoir. Sounds simple? I've heard that you should start at the caliper furthest from the reservoir and work back, and to take care not to break off any corroded bleeder screws. Any other advice/warnings/cautions/gotchas I should be aware of? How about recommended brake fluid?

Thanks in advance, and...

Cheers!

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sequence is not important. In the old days (pre 1967 ) cars had single circuit brakes, and that's why the advice was to start farthest away. Now we have ABS units, and tandem master cylinders using either front-rear split, or triangular split, and it just doesn't matter anymore.

I tend to start at the right rear and go clockwise around the car, and then repeat.

As well many shops use pressure bleeding, which is by far the best way, certainly better than pumping the pedal, and pressure also doesn't need any particular sequence.

Just go around twice and you'll be fine.

Be careful with the bleeder screws, usually they release nicely on these cars. I believe Lexus states DOT 3 fluid, although you could spend the extra and use DOT 4 which is fully compatible. No others though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wondering if anyone uses brake fluid test strips, like so -> http://www.denlorstools.com/home/dt1/page_3743_401/phoenix_systems_brake_fluid_test_strips_100_pk.html

Or brake fluid testers -> http://www.denlorstools.com/home/dt1/page_5490_161/electronic_brake_fluid_moisture_tester.html

I know some shops carry these strips or testers and can check it for you.

For the price, I think it may be cheaper to just flush the system and be done with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to bleed and replace all the brake fluid on my new-to-me '02 LS 430 tomorrow, as the stuff in there is pretty dark and may be factory original at 85K. I have access to a Snap-On vacuum brake bleeder that attaches to the bleeder screws and sucks out the old stuff, then draws in the new stuff when you add it at the reservoir. Sounds simple? I've heard that you should start at the caliper furthest from the reservoir and work back, and to take care not to break off any corroded bleeder screws. Any other advice/warnings/cautions/gotchas I should be aware of? How about recommended brake fluid?

Thanks in advance, and...

Cheers!

Tom

First clean the outside of the brake fluid reservoir so no dirt gets in. Then open the reservoir and suction out (e.g., with a turkey baster) as much old fluid as you can. Clean as much as possible. Then add new brake fluid to top up the reservoir. When sucking out the old stuff from the bleed screws, periodically check the reservoir and add more new fluid to make sure it never runs dry. If you make a mistake there, you'll have a lot of air in the system to bleed out.

Also, when pouring in the new fluid, try to pour carefully with little splashing so you don't entrain air bubbles in the fluid. And don't shake up the bottle before starting - same reason. Once the bottle is opened, it has limited shelf life, so factor that in to your brake fluid purchasing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this