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TOGWT

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Everything posted by TOGWT

  1. You will not need to apply another clear coat. The scratches / surface marring require an abrasive polish and a pad to 'level' (remove) them. I would suggest you find a detailer to undertake this for you. Meanwhile buy a Glaze, a kind of wax (it contains oils / waxes / fillers ) that will hide the scratches etc. I feel for you, my daughter 'helped' Daddy by cleaning a new MB with a Scotchpad "Well it was very, very dirty"
  2. Before using a leather care product a detailer needs to know the material they are working on, and wither the product chosen is compatible with the material and will not damage it. Diagnosis is the key, not guess work. Before deciding on what products to use you need to ascertain what type of leather finish you have and wither the pigmented leather has a polyurethane covering, or is (un-coated) finished natural leather, as the cleaning / maintenance varies as to type; although they all require a water-based product to maintain hydration (a suede type leather like Nubuck is the exception). Automotive leather care is a subject surrounded with misinformation and myth, products such as leather (Saddle) soaps, oil-based Conditioners, Neats-foot oil, and Hide Food still prevail as top sellers, albeit most are made for equestrian tack, Leatherequi, an oil-based product is also a very popular, that is used in a market that is dominated by pigmented leather with an acrylic water-based polythene protective covering; which are very different leathers with completely differing care requirements. The exact reason why this is the case is unclear. It’s possible that there is an association with old world quality (i.e. European automobiles with leather upholstery and real burl wood interiors) with these types of products, despite the fact that the automotive industry has been using water-based polyurethane covered pigmented leather for many years See also Leather Care article DetailingWiki
  3. togwt, the dealer has now said there is a process they can do so the spots never come back again, I'm wondering if it's the process you have outlined. They are now saying they think it may be rail dust and they have a memo in case paint gets these yellow "rust" spots. Doesn't that procedure also strip the clear coat off the paint and wouldn't Lexus have to replace the clear coating? The process outlined in my answer is recommened by OEM to dealer's to rectify this problem. It will not remove the clear coat (I use this process bi-annually as I live near the beach)
  4. Rust Spots: Corroded ferrous contaminations, small particles of metal (ferrous oxide) created by railroad wheels abrading the metal tracks, or airborne brake dust from rotor abrasion, these particles become airborne and pollute paint film surfaces. New cars that are transported by rail are at extra risk. When moisture combines with the metal particles rust is formed, creating small orange / brown rust spots (especially visible on light coloured paint (white, silver, etc) It should be removed as soon as it’s noticed. These can usually be removed with detailer’s clay or an abrasive polish and then neutralised with a suitable rust inhibitor. If the rust spots become allied with acid rain it may permeate the paint surface, causing the paint to 'bubble' if this should happen the affected surface should be treated with a suitable rust inhibitor to avoid the rust contaminating other areas (See also Detailers Clay, Corrosion and/or Decontamination) Rust Decontamination (Paint surface): Corrosion (rust) destroys metal by an electro-chemical reaction with water as the catalyst (water + ozone (an oxidizer) moisture + oxygen). Detailer’s clay will remove the ferrous metal brake dust that acts as a conduit for moisture to penetrate the paint down to the base metal. (See also Reactivity) A three step neutralization and wash system formulated to remove industrial fallout, rail dust, hard water deposits, acid rain residue, salt and other forms of pollutants. This system (Auto Internationals A, B, & C System) comprises; (a) Acid Neutralizer (B) Alkaline Neutralizer (use in conjunction with detailer’s clay) and © a pH 7.0 Surface Conditioner, which safely removes both surface and subsurface contamination (i.e. rust) that collects on a painted finish which includes, industrial fallout (IFO), rail dust, acid rain, hard water spots, road tar, bird excrement, waxes/silicones, oxidation, adhesive residue, road grime and rust stains introduced via road salt, ferrous metal deposits. Auto International - http://www.http://www.autoint.com/autostor...Sellers..P.asp/ After the paint surface has been subjected to a chemical cleaning its protective layer (s) have been removed and the paint surface left without protection, so it is very important that a wax or polymer protection be applied immediately.
  5. Quote: Collinite Insulator Wax, also known as #845 is a favorite amongst professional detailers because of the protection it affords and its durability. It is one of the longest lasting waxes out there. Also, in regards to the containers, many professional detailers if not most, buy their products by the gallon, so they pour their products into plastic dispensers/bottles because it makes it easier to pour out rather than trying to do so out of a gallon. One of my favorite "pink" products is Fk 425, which is a Quick Detailer that adds incredible gloss to the paint. My favorite "blue" liquid is ONR (Optimun No Rinse Wash). Detailing by colours - ;)
  6. Try a chemical type paint cleaner (Zaino Z-AIO) the bird mess - Bird Excrement - http://forums.corvetteforum.com/showthread.php?t=1757917&page=2&highlight=bird+excrement
  7. I hear you. Though she seems to know a lot about leather care and I do appreciate her advise, she still refuses to recommend products while putting down others. I did PM her twice and finally she recommended a leather cleaner, guess which one she recommended? Yeap, the one from her company. However, I did read a post in which she praised Leather Master. Her company used to be a reseller for Leather Master's product's until they produced a 'superior line' My preferred leather care products are water-based; manufactured by Leather Master's, they have been supplying leather care products since 1985, and they are the benchmark for other leather products. Leather Master’s trade mark was created and the development of product and techniques for care, protection and repair of leather There are a few water-based leather care product that do what they say they do, Sonus, Iz, etc
  8. detaildoc - I have read many of JudyB’s posts on various forums but I don’t understand her marketing strategy. She is the MD for a leather product company in the UK but never names a suitable product to go along with the knowledgeable advice she offers on leather care. She post’s on a UK based detailing forum but for her own reasons chooses not to become a sponsor that would allow her to advertise her companies products, but will advise you on what is wrong with competitors products. I have always preferred un-biased advice from someone who offers an honest opinion as opposed to merely advertising. Commercialism brings with it concerns of honesty and true representation. In other words, it’s difficult to know what is true when someone is motivated by income, i.e. directly targeted at product sales, more so than an unbiased opinion I try to recommend products that I have used and do, or exceed what the mfg says they will
  9. Leather Protection is far more viable and will provide better long-term benefits than a conditioner as so many so called leather conditioners utilize chemical solvents in order to facilitate penetration of there oils; this has a detrimental effect of the polyethylene covering causing fissures (cracking). If your leather upholstery is becoming inflexible use Leather Master’s Vital, as leather requires re-hydration (moisture replacement) not a leather conditioner. Water-based leather products - Cleaners; Leather Master US - http://www.topoftheline.com / Sonus - http://www.autopia.net Protection;http://www.topoftheline.com Basic Leather care - http://www.autogeekonline.net/forum/...ther-care.html
  10. Leather Conditioners: I have discussed this issue with many people in the leather tanning / preservation / care products industry and haven't received a definitive answer. My issues are; a) How much conditioner will permeate the thick polyurethane top coat on the leather B) Chrome tanned leather hides are sealed at the tannery and then pigmented; what could a conditioner do for the hide? Approximately 90% of vehicle manufacturers are using a split-leather hide and a (thermoplastic) polyurethane covering for their interior upholstery. Vehicle upholstery is chrome tanned and uniquely treated with a light pigmented urethane coating and / or a vinyl covering to make it more viable for automotive seating. It retains the softness of natural top-grain leather but resists fading in direct sunlight, which besides body oil is leathers worst enemy. The complex tanning process of chromed tanned hides results in the fat liquoring and oils necessary to keep the hide soft and pliable being locked in, this is further sealed by a durable polyethylene covering to protect the hide from abrasion from clothing as well as the dust / dirt introduced by the vehicle’s AC system. This type of automotive upholstery finish should not be considered a natural leather hide as far as care and its maintenance is concerned, only requiring that you maintain its moisture and protect it from ultra violet (UV) radiation. A water-based cleaner will permeate the polyurethane covering as its molecules are much smaller Leather Protection is far more viable and will provide better long-term benefits than a conditioner as so many so called leather conditioners utilize chemical solvents in order to facilitate penetration of there oils; this has a detrimental effect of the polyethylene covering causing fissures (cracking). If your leather upholstery is becoming inflexible use Leather Master’s Vital, as leather requires re-hydration (moisture replacement) not a leather conditioner. Before using a leather care product a detailer needs to know the material they are working on, and wither the product chosen is compatible with the material and will not damage it. Diagnosis is the key, not guess work. Before deciding on what products to use you need to ascertain what type of leather finish you have and wither the pigmented leather has a polyurethane covering, or is (un-coated) finished natural leather, as the cleaning / maintenance varies as to type; although they all require a water-based product to maintain hydration (a suede type leather like Nubuck is the exception). Automotive leather care is a subject surrounded with misinformation and myth, products such as leather (Saddle) soaps, oil-based Conditioners, Neats-foot oil, and Hide Food still prevail as top sellers, albeit most are made for equestrian tack, Leatherequi is also a very popular product that is used in a market that is dominated by pigmented leather with an acrylic polythene protective covering; which are very different leathers with completely differing care requirements. The exact reason why this is the case is unclear. It’s possible that there is an association with old world quality (i.e. leather upholstery and burl wood interiors) with these types of products, despite the fact that the automotive industry has been using polyurethane covered pigmented leather for many years.
  11. Waffle Weave Towel: A waffle (Piqué) weave towel is a synthetic Micro fibre woven with a dimpled pattern, which provides thousands of small pockets to trap dirt or grit. The absorbency of these towels is quite remarkable; they are able to hold seven or eight times their weight in water. Drying methodology- lay the waffle weave towel on the surface and gently pull it across, for vertical panels place towel on surface and pull upwards, provided the paint finish has been rinsed adequately (water ‘sheeting’) there should be no dirt residue, check and rinse the towel often The reason I advice against the use of natural or synthetic chamois or flat surface synthetic sponges is that grit or dirt can become trapped between its flat surface and the paint causing scratches, with a waffle weave type fabric the dirt/grit is collected in the ‘pockets’ of the weave - 25 x 36-inch, very absorbent, won’t leave streaks or leave lint, no need to wring-out, with silk edging- http://store.pakshak.com/waffle-weave-micr...el-25x36-2.html
  12. In order to make a Carnauba wax 'workable' it requires the addition of a solvent. By applying another low-solvent product on top of one that has already cross-linked you can increase its density (up to a point) two to cured applications are usually considered optimum One thing that will negate the applied product density is lack of clarity, the base coat (that contains the vehicles colour) is covered / protected by a clear coat of urethane paint, which as well as providing protection is clear to enable the paint colour to show through and provide the colour with depth.
  13. Always use the least invasive product first- a) A safe solvent; Stoner’s Tarminator, Simple Green® Aircraft & Precision Cleaner, Isopropyl alcohol or Mineral spirits B) Detailer’s Clay / Lubricant c) A chemical / abrasive paint surface cleaner (Zaino Paint Cleaner Z-PC or Zaino All-In-One Z-AIO) d) If the surface has been etched use an abrasive polish and a polisher (Rotary or Random orbital) e) Wet-sand using 2000 – 300 grit finishing paper The same rule applies to abrasive polishes, finishing papers and foam pads – Always use the least abrasive first before ‘stepping–up’ to the next abrasive level
  14. I have no idea on costs, but it may be a viable option (as close to OEM as you could get) Leather seat re-upholstery - http://www.leatherseats.com/ http://www.trimcar.com/ http://www.katzkin.com/ http://www.gahh.com/index.php
  15. Removing Oxidation from Headlights - http://us.lexusownersclub.com/forums/index...showtopic=31445
  16. Water-based paints are used on modern cars are softer and more porous than the older oil-based paints; they are protected by a urethane or polyurethane paint clear coat. These clear coat systems are primarily formulated from oils that are subject to oxidation and attack by environmental pollutants and the suns heat that dry out the resins in the paint leaving a porous surface that is susceptible to attack from acid rain, hydrocarbons, ozone, industrial contaminants, and many other forms of foreign particles. It requires protection from the environment by the application of a sacrificial barrier. Most polymer sealants will last approximately 4-6 months, dependant upon driving and environmental conditions. Currently there is no care product that will provide protection for 5-years without re-application; nothing could be further from reality The paint film surface also requires that road dirt and tar, dust and grime be removed by washing the vehicle on a regular basis. Teflon® PTFE (DuPont): [: a polymer of the monomer tetrafluoroethylene] Teflon® will help ‘spread ability’ (but then so do silicone oils) it does nothing for durability because of its required application method-although Teflon® is an exceptional product when used as intended; it provides no benefit in a wax or polish. According to G.R. Ansul of DuPont's Car Care Products, Specialty Products Division, "The addition of a Teflon® flouropolymer resin (PTFE) does nothing to enhance the properties of a car wax. We have no data that indicates the use of Teflon® fluoropolymer resins is beneficial in car waxes, and we have not seen data from other people that support this position." Manufacturers of gimmicky, over-hyped products sometimes claim that their products contain Teflon®, hoping that the consumer will believe there is something special about that product. Ansul also notes that, "Unless Teflon® is applied at 700 degrees F, and using a dissolving chemical C8, it is not a viable ingredient, and is 100 percent useless in protecting the paint's finish." This is hot enough that your car's paint (let alone your car) wouldn't survive. Information resource- Grisanti, Stephen "The Truth About Teflon®" Professional Car washing & Detailing, Jan1989) http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-...RS=PN/4,284,668
  17. Run Razor - This cleverly-designed tool will take care of any problem areas that crop up toward the end of the painting process. Run Razor holds standard razor blades at a precise angle to shave down semi-hardened runs, sags or dust between colour and clear coats. Just pass it gently over the surface, dialling down the blade position indicator in.001" increments until the imperfection is gone - http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump.jsp?itemID=...temType=PRODUCT.
  18. Happy Thanksgiving to all of you and your families I’m in the UK right now and they don’t celebrate Thanksgiving here, but I am always reminded of how thankful I am for surviving cancer (awhile ago now, but gone; never, ever, ever forgotten) JonM (aka the old grey whistle test (TOGWT)
  19. Well, while I’m certainly not a subject-matter expert, much less a guru; I don’t mind sharing the knowledge I have gained from almost five decades of detailing experience, the insights from my profession as a Chemical Engineer, and the research carried out in order to compile a detailing reference book, and as for the rest I usually know where to look for the answers. I would strongly suggest that you verify any information that I or anyone else shares with you.
  20. Why share knowledge? I think that the more real facts you know the better. I don't light hoods on fire and don't pour acid on the paint. Detail products work on their real merits, not on smoke and mirrors. It is my intent to educate and pass on five decades of detailing experience, and my experience as a Chemical Engineer to my readers in not only the “How it works’ but “Why it works”. Because I’m passionate about I do and care about making sure detailing is a fun and rewarding experience for the enthusiast
  21. Do not use Saddle soap - is an emulsion of fats and oils, originally used as a leather softener (fat liquoring) before chrome tanning. In reality, saddle soap is a very poor cleaner as its alkaline detergents must first dissolve its inbuilt oils and fat, limiting its capacity to dissolve dirt and body oils in the leather. Being inherently alkaline it will damage the finished leather or the thin vinyl film on covered leather, saddle soap also contains wax and solvents, which are required to weatherproof the leather, both of which are detrimental to finished leather upholstery. Another problem arises during application. Most saddle soaps instruct the user to work the lather into the leather, since loosened dirt is suspended in the lather; it is pushed back into the leather's pores. Using a product on finished automotive upholstery that is formulated for use on equestrian tack and is not recommended
  22. I would agree that ONR is very easy to use, there are instructions on the bottle. I have suggested in that post a few tips to get the most from the product, one of many I'm sure. FWIW (autopia.net as autopia .com is a computer company)I don't see what difference it makes what the forum source of information is, it's either good, bad or indifferent, but then you do like to 'stir the pot'.
  23. ONR - http://forums.corvetteforum.com/showthread...#post1562327779
  24. Me too - Methodology: •Clean glass to remove dirt, dust or road grime from surfaces (also see note 1) •Apply clay (Magic Clay®) and lubricant solution (WooliteTM / Water 5:1) onto the glass surface (Do not apply to plastic as dulling may occur.) •Apply a quarter (coin) size amount of Autoglym Car Glass Polish™ or Iz Einzette Glas Polish to a damp cutting / polishing foam pad (LC Orange or White) attached to a Porter Cable HS rotary polisher set at speed 1200 rpm. •Heat caused by abrasive polishing can soften and damage glass; foam pad and product used must minimize heat build-up. Since glass is a poor heat conductor any friction heat built up from polishing must be kept to a minimum by using sufficient product and regular misting of both the polishing pad and glass surface with water. •Apply to half of the surface / windshield, polishing first in an up and down motion then in a left-to-right motion and then repeat on the other side, proceed to other glass surfaces. •Go over the glass several times in each direction, glass will polish virtually residue free. •Wipe off any residue, and polish with a clean dry 100% cotton Micro fibre cloth. •Inspect glass for clarity and smoothness. Repeat if necessary. •If the glass has PPG Industries Optech clear coating a more aggressive polish may be required Alternative products / methods: a) Apply Zaino Z-12 with a damp cotton cloth to cool glass, apply to small sections at a time and allow to completely dry, buffing with a clean dry cotton towel. If there is any smearing or residue left just use Stoner’s Invisible Glass or any good quality glass cleaner to remove excess residue. B) Janvil Scratch Remover (JV-326 / Glass Renew JV-325) - http://www.janvil.com/glass_restore.htm c) Glass Technology Inc - http://www.gtglass.com/scratchremoval.htm Alternative pads- these 4-inch ‘Metal Polishing Pads’ are made of course, 600 grit nylon (Scotchbrite®) and are designed for hard / rough surfaces like aluminium diamond plate, pitted aluminium, chrome, and glass. http://topoftheline.com
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