GoldenStateSilverSport

Regular Member
  • Content Count

    132
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    4

Everything posted by GoldenStateSilverSport

  1. Hey Gang - It's been awhile since I've visited this thread. Glad to see that this has helped soo many people!! For those who plan on going through with this DIY fix, I'd like to re-iterate the screws are tough to take out so be prepared with the proper tools to remove them. Also glad to see one of the posters mentioned it possible to stop by a home depot and pick up some extra replacement screws for a few dollars! "As stated by ml30306 in post# 170, if you want to replace the 3 screws for the throttle unit for the RX300, get 2 units with bolt size M6 with 1" pitch and length of 60mm and another one with size M6 and length of 28 mm also with 1" pitch. Diameter of the screws is ~5mm."
  2. Guys- It's been awhile since i visited this forum, but wanted to say, I just performed this again yesterday! Car is working great - I can't believe my post on this was 6 years ago!! Glad to see it can help soo many people. As usual, it was tough getting the factory screws out but that's where the grip locking pliers can help!! Cheers, Gang!!
  3. Hello Everyone, I know IACV has been a huge topic on the forum and I have found various pictures in the RX forum and ES forum on the idle air control valve (IACV) or as others call it the idle speed control valve (ISC). However, I have not found a "step by step" posting to date which definitively shows how to clean this thing so that my car stops giving me idling problems. Symptoms I have had included: - low and rough idling that would cause the car engine to start shaking after starting the car - this eventually got worse to the point that when I start my car, it would not idle unless I gave it gas - idling problems for me tended to occur more often after my engine was warm or had been sitting in the sun I hope these series of postings help you fellow LOC members out there. You've certainly helped me in the past so here's my two cents at this common problem. Additionally, the instructions I give are the way in which I have cleaned it myself. As you go about and attempt this, you may find better ways to do so. Please add and refine my instructions/terminology as needed. I am not a professional. I've only changed my oil, air filters, and conducted minor maintenance previously. The bottom line is that if you have the right tools, you should be able to do this. This discovery/ cleaning took me about 2 hours to do cause I ran into problems and there were major steps left out in previous postings that I've encountered read. The next time I do this, I believe I can get this done in about an hour or less. Tools Needed: 1) Tightly fitting Philips Screw Driver 2) Carb cleaner that is O2 sensor safe (I've seen CRC. I used Valvoline Carb Cleaner) 3) Locking Grip Pliers (definitely helped me remove the factory tight screws) 4) Small brush for cleaning 5) Towels for cleaning 6) Pliers (help removed brackets holding the hoses) 7) Latex gloves helps with limit the messiness. * I used the same gasket and did not replace it. No problems found. 1) Remove the hose that comes from the engine/motor that connects to the air intake hoses.( Hose is below in red – we'll refer to this as Hose A) When you pull back the rubber hose covering, you will see that a metal bracket is holding the hose pretty tightly in place. Use the pliers to clasps the two metal pieces together to loosen the bracket and pull the hose loose. You can also do this by hand if it's easier for you. 2) Upon removing the hose, you will want to remove the two air intake hoses. Loosen the three screws above in green and remove the hose. Below is a picture of the intake hoses removed. 3)After removing the intake hoses, I opened the lid to the air filter and moved this to the side of the car to create more working room. I believe there are two clips on the right holding the lid in place. Just pop the two clips and move the cover to the side. I also took out the air filter and temporarily moved this to the side. 4)After removing the intake hose, the throttle body/IACV/black electric coil is revealed. At this point, I removed the black electric wire from the black coil. Once the electric wire is removed you can remove the black coil from the IACV by removing the two screws. Note, the screws are factory tight so use a tight fitting screw driver to remove the screws. One of my screws was partially stripped from the dealership's work, so I had to resort to my locking grip pliers which helped out tremendously. After removing the two screws, the black electric piece pops right off. When the black electrical coil is removed from the IACV, it exposes a small pencil sized metal stud. You will also notice a washer that sits on this stud. Don't lose this washer. Take it and put it aside so it doesn't fall off when you continue on in the next steps. 5)Additionally, I removed the hose coming out of the IACV. We'll call this Hose B. This hose can be removed in the same manner by clamping the bracket and pulling the hose out. You will see that the hose is removed below. Below are pictures of before and after. 6)Here is where the fun begins. I initially attempted to remove the four screws attached to the IACV at this point, but found that after an hour, this would be nearly impossible to remove considering the location of the screws were in an extremely tight spot. The only way I would be able to remove the IACV is to remove right throttle body. Not as tough as it sounds. Three screws need to be removed to accomplish this. Again, be careful when removing the screws. Also you will see I removed another electric plug and I also cut a tie wrap. Once you complete these steps, the throttle body/ IACV comes out pretty easily. Note when you remove the throttle body, there will be one LAST hose connected to the IACV. Be careful when you remove this hose as radiator fluid may spill. Some of my fluid spilled out so I just refilled my coolant after I was done. 7)Below is a picture of the bottom view of the IACV. You now can EASILY remove the four screws connecting the IACV to the throttle body . In the picture below, I have already removed one of the screws. Once the four screws are removed the IACV and throttle body separate. Now you can clean both of them with your carb cleaner, brush, towels, cotton swabs etc…. Picture here is before I the cleaning with all the muck inside Pictures after I cleaned the IACV and throttle body This last picture is the post throttle body cleaning 8) Once you are done cleaning, just put back the throttle body/iacv the same way you took it off, and put everything back in reverse order. Ensure the gasket is in place. Also, ensure you put the washer back on the electric coil. Make sure you place hose A & B back and ensure the electric plugs are back in their original position. Once these things are in place, then it's all about putting the air filter/hoses back and you are good to go. If you have lost any coolant, make sure you refill it to a safe level. After completing this cleaning, my car starts up without any problem and idles as if I just purchased the car brand new. Replacing this at a dealership would have costed me $300-400 easily. Let me know if you have any questions. Cheers (Also, I tried to post these as separate replys, but the software combined all my replies into a single reply and did not keep them separated) *Edited the posting to have the pictures follow step by step in sequential order*
  4. Hello Everyone, I know IACV has been a huge topic on the forum and I have found various pictures in the RX forum and ES forum on the idle air control valve (IACV) or as others call it the idle speed control valve (ISC). However, I have not found a "step by step" posting to date which definitively shows how to clean this thing so that my car stops giving me idling problems. Symptoms I have had included: - low and rough idling that would cause the car engine to start shaking after starting the car - this eventually got worse to the point that when I start my car, it would not idle unless I gave it gas - idling problems for me tended to occur more often after my engine was warm or had been sitting in the sun I hope these series of postings help you fellow LOC members out there. You've certainly helped me in the past so here's my two cents at this common problem. Additionally, the instructions I give are the way in which I have cleaned it myself. As you go about and attempt this, you may find better ways to do so. Please add and refine my instructions/terminology as needed. I am not a professional. I've only changed my oil, air filters, and conducted minor maintenance previously. The bottom line is that if you have the right tools, you should be able to do this. This discovery/ cleaning took me about 2 hours to do cause I ran into problems and there were major steps left out in previous postings that I've encountered read. The next time I do this, I believe I can get this done in about an hour or less. Tools Needed: 1) Tightly fitting Philips Screw Driver 2) Carb cleaner that is O2 sensor safe (I've seen CRC. I used Valvoline Carb Cleaner) 3) Locking Grip Pliers (definitely helped me remove the factory tight screws) 4) Small brush for cleaning 5) Towels for cleaning 6) Pliers (help removed brackets holding the hoses) 7) Latex gloves helps with limit the messiness. * I used the same gasket and did not replace it. No problems found. 1) Remove the hose that comes from the engine/motor that connects to the air intake hoses.( Hose is below in red – we'll refer to this as Hose A) When you pull back the rubber hose covering, you will see that a metal bracket is holding the hose pretty tightly in place. Use the pliers to clasps the two metal pieces together to loosen the bracket and pull the hose loose. You can also do this by hand if it's easier for you. 2) Upon removing the hose, you will want to remove the two air intake hoses. Loosen the three screws above in green and remove the hose. Below is a picture of the intake hoses removed. 3)After removing the intake hoses, I opened the lid to the air filter and moved this to the side of the car to create more working room. I believe there are two clips on the right holding the lid in place. Just pop the two clips and move the cover to the side. I also took out the air filter and temporarily moved this to the side. 4)After removing the intake hose, the throttle body/IACV/black electric coil is revealed. At this point, I removed the black electric wire from the black coil. Once the electric wire is removed you can remove the black coil from the IACV by removing the two screws. Note, the screws are factory tight so use a tight fitting screw driver to remove the screws. One of my screws was partially stripped from the dealership's work, so I had to resort to my locking grip pliers which helped out tremendously. After removing the two screws, the black electric piece pops right off. When the black electrical coil is removed from the IACV, it exposes a small pencil sized metal stud. You will also notice a washer that sits on this stud. Don't lose this washer. Take it and put it aside so it doesn't fall off when you continue on in the next steps. 5)Additionally, I removed the hose coming out of the IACV. We'll call this Hose B. This hose can be removed in the same manner by clamping the bracket and pulling the hose out. You will see that the hose is removed below. Below are pictures of before and after. 6)Here is where the fun begins. I initially attempted to remove the four screws attached to the IACV at this point, but found that after an hour, this would be nearly impossible to remove considering the location of the screws were in an extremely tight spot. The only way I would be able to remove the IACV is to remove right throttle body. Not as tough as it sounds. Three screws need to be removed to accomplish this. Again, be careful when removing the screws. Also you will see I removed another electric plug and I also cut a tie wrap. Once you complete these steps, the throttle body/ IACV comes out pretty easily. Note when you remove the throttle body, there will be one LAST hose connected to the IACV. Be careful when you remove this hose as radiator fluid may spill. Some of my fluid spilled out so I just refilled my coolant after I was done. 7)Below is a picture of the bottom view of the IACV. You now can EASILY remove the four screws connecting the IACV to the throttle body . In the picture below, I have already removed one of the screws. Once the four screws are removed the IACV and throttle body separate. Now you can clean both of them with your carb cleaner, brush, towels, cotton swabs etc…. Picture here is before I the cleaning with all the muck inside Pictures after I cleaned the IACV and throttle body This last picture is the post throttle body cleaning 8) Once you are done cleaning, just put back the throttle body/iacv the same way you took it off, and put everything back in reverse order. Ensure the gasket is in place. Also, ensure you put the washer back on the electric coil. Make sure you place hose A & B back and ensure the electric plugs are back in their original position. Once these things are in place, then it's all about putting the air filter/hoses back and you are good to go. If you have lost any coolant, make sure you refill it to a safe level. After completing this cleaning, my car starts up without any problem and idles as if I just purchased the car brand new. Replacing this at a dealership would have costed me $300-400 easily. Let me know if you have any questions. Cheers (Also, I tried to post these as separate replys, but the software combined all my replies into a single reply and did not keep them separated) *Edited the posting to have the pictures follow step by step in sequential order*
  5. I agree..bear in mind i got the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S PLUS..they have a 45k mile warranty and were about 1k.
  6. how do you know when the brakes are gone? i suspect you'll hear a scratching/squeeling noise. I'm concerned cause i have 26k miles on my ride with the original brake pads..no issues so i hope it's not metal to metal yet...the brakes on my RX300 lasted till 60k!!..sounds like these GSes are not equipped with the same type of pads. =( Second question - do you have to complain to get the TSB for the dustless pads or will they just do it if you ask (even in my case with 26k miles?)
  7. Love the rubber all weather floor-mats. They are just great on my car. They protect the fabric mats and catch all the dirt and grime and all that good stuff. I live in Cali and don't really have to deal with snow, but I keep these in my car year round. Love it and don't regret it at all!
  8. Clarification - When you say lube the "Window Channel", what exact does that refer to? I tried to Google "Window Channel" and it appears that it's the "track" or railway" where the window slides along? (I think it's like rubber or felt on the RX)? So if I were to lube this piece, I'd roll my window all the way down, and sparingly apply this Sil-Glyde up and down the vertical "channel" on each side of the window?
  9. I greatly appreciate the feedback. I haven't previously thought about "bargaining" for tires though your suggestion makes sense in this economic climate. I want to streeeeeetch the life of my stock Yokos as much as I can, but I saw that the Michelin's at Costco have a sale for $70 off of 4 tires right now (which is OK - not great) Total cost for four tires runs to about $1100. In addition, the Bridgestones have a $100 off when you buy 4 as well- total is about $950. If you want to get down to comparing $/mile the Bridgestones slightly edge out the Michelins 2.3cents/mile to 2.4cents/mile which is pretty negligible. I'm now intrigued by your suggestion of bargaining with certain dealers. I wonder if I could get a better deal elsewhere...
  10. I'm having trouble deciding between the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S Plus tires which have a 45k warranty or the Bridgestone Potenza RE960A/S Pole Position tires - both are suppose to be very good. The Potenzas are at the top of the list with respect to tire rack reviews, however the Pilot Plus tires just came out and are suppose to be an improvement. Decisions...decisions...I need someone to sway me one way other another =P Thoughts?
  11. I'm having trouble deciding between the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S Plus tires which have a 45k warranty or the Bridgestone Potenza RE960A/S Pole Position tires - both are suppose to be very good. The Potenzas are at the top of the list with respect to tire rack reviews, however the Pilot Plus tires just came out and are suppose to be an improvement. Decisions...decisions...I need someone to sway me one way other another =P Thoughts?
  12. I experienced the same issue here as well. Had problems closing my fuel door, and if I did manage to get it closed, it would pop right back open as soon as drove over a bump. Took it to Lexus about a year ago and they were able to address the problem, however it appears as if the issue has come back. I notice that when I refill my gas, it's common to have issues closing the fuel door. I guess I need to head back to the dealer some time soon.
  13. I have the exact same issue. Gremlins in my window system. When I slightly push down on the window button, it rolls down my window from the closed position all the way down..and when I try to roll it up, i have to try and do so ~20 times until it will roll up - same behavior on the passenger window side..i'll try cleaning it and see if tha thelps
  14. $75/hr is definitely not cheap and that's probably one of the "cheaper" rates around here. This process wasn't so bad to do so glad I could help. Happy Holidays!
  15. Bridgestone H/L Alenzas. Firestone autocare in san jose installed the. I'll be 100% honest. I got the Bridgestone Alenza's after reading about all the good reviews esp on tire rack

    The good:

    + Long Life - I think 60k; much longer than the original Duelers (~25k?)

    + Great traction esp in rain

    + Good traction in snow - Let's face it, the RX wasn't made for

  16. Thank you. I just picked my car up and will have to check back with them to make sure they used these pads. How many more miles (avg.) should you expect from these pads. I really appreciate the information Awaysack ...but the difference is small and they will squeak when stopping but the longevity and cleanliness of the rims is a worthy trade off unless you are hyper critical about performance then stick with the high friction pads. Anthony Not sure I'm a fan of the squeaking part...Not cool to be pulling in a parking lot with the car squeaking as you brake to stop...it gets annoying at times..
  17. I'll be 100% honest. I got the Bridgestone Alenza's after reading about all the good reviews esp on tire rack The good: + Long Life - I think 60k; much longer than the original Duelers (~25k?) + Great traction esp in rain + Good traction in snow - Let's face it, the RX wasn't made for snow. Regardless of the tires you put on, it may still slip in HEAVY snow (except for maybe specialized snow tires). BTW, my car is AWD The bad: - Decrease in MPG (according to the car's MPG gauge) - I think the original tires were a little "smoother". Softer compound, but the traction was definately not as good.
  18. Thanks, RX. I should just go and jump over a cliff =P. How about I get in the car and drive it over the cliff.
  19. Thanks for being gentle, Captain. :P I've been doing my own oil changes every 5k up to this point since I enjoy it. I take my car in for the 30/60/90k since I'm not adept on doing the major work. Everyone talks about the timing belt being the "major" one so I figure now is my time.
  20. 90k Service done at Toyota- Basic 90k - $569.95 Synthetic oil change Change engine air filter Replace coolant Replace iridium spark plugs Rotate Tires Drain and refill tranny Inspect: Brakes, discs, drums, lines, hoses drive shaft boots steering linkage drive belts body and chassis nuts and bolts fuel line connections exhaust/mountings Additional Services & Costs Wiper Blades (3 total - 2 front, 1 back) - $40 Timing Belt Parts $104.26 Labor $650 Fluid Changes & Fuel Injection - $278.88 1) P/S Fluid 2) Brake Fluid 3) Fuel Injection (every 30k) Rear Bulb - $3 Drive Belts (2 belts) Total = $1631.09 Grant total OTD with 15% Discount = $1391 What's the verdict?
  21. Jiffylube should be okay. But I would becareful. Several years ago, I caught one guy at a tire store cheated and didn't replace my oil filter. And at another oil change place, they had a hard time figure out how to replace the oil filter(understandably they lack the familiarity in our kind of card). I had to show tell them its best to take the bottom engine cover off to access the filter.... I'd stay away form JiffyLube...Check out this video. 5 out of 9 shops cheated their customer!!!
  22. ... Is there a way you could position the pictures in an orderly step-by-step on your original post? I'm going to use the pictures as my guide along with your instructions, but some of the pictures and what steps they belong with are slightly confusing me. ... Your wish is my command..good luck guys!
  23. Take your car to a Toyota Dealership..aka Capitol Toyota or Piercy and tell them specifically what you want done. Chances are it'll be cheaper than Lex.
  24. Nice work, you guys!! I see many of you have fixed this problem on your own. More power to you. SKPerformance..STICKY ME =) (16,000+ views so far isn't bad)