CELSI0R

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CELSI0R last won the day on January 9 2018

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About CELSI0R

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    Club Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Lexus Model
    LS 400
  • Lexus Year
    1991
  • Location
    New Jersey (NJ)

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  1. The ECU will not recognize a change in wheel size, and relies on the car having the same size wheels (in total diameter, including rims and tires) as it did stock when determining speed. If the speed was reading fine when the stock rims and tires were on the car, then changing the cluster may not necessarily fix the problem. As sha4000 suggested, I would try putting the stock rims back on the car, to see if the speed is reading properly again. However, your new tires should not have resulted in such a dramatic change in speed. I calculated what you should expect using a calculator on TireSize.com: On the other hand, you mentioned that the speedometer needle doesn't start moving until about 15 mph. Try hooking up a scan tool, and have a passenger check if the speed is correct coming from the ECU's diagnostic port as you drive. If it is, then the problem could be the cluster.
  2. MAF sensor cleaner will destroy the Karman Vortex MAFs on these cars, so it's a good thing you found out before it was too late. I got really worried when I read the title of this thread. 😅 The MAF sensors in these first generation (1990-1994) LS 400s don't need to be cleaned or serviced at all
  3. The car is one of 450 prototype cars built in 1985, according to the museum's old website: https://web.archive.org/web/20160623223329/http://www.toyotausamuseum.com/collection/1990_LS400.htm
  4. Car and Driver has released this article on their website with more photos! https://www.caranddriver.com/features/luxury-japanese-style-revisiting-the-original-lexus-ls400-feature I hope that everyone has a happy New Year!
  5. Glad you liked it, Paul! For anyone who is also interested, I speculate that the car featured here is the same LS 400 currently being held at the Toyota USA Auto Museum in California: Even though this car has a plate on it, it has been in photos before with the plate removed, such as this one: The mounting holes are so small, that at the right angle with the right lighting, or with the use of photo editing, it could appear as if they aren't even there (like the photo in the C&D article). Notice how hard it is to see the holes on the ES 250 beside the LS (above). The museum car is also a non-Trac equipped model, just like the one in the article: Sources for photos: http://www.speedhunters.com/2012/05/the-toyota-usa-museumfrom-lexus-to-nascar-more/ http://japanesenostalgiccar.com/the-lexus-ls-400-is-officially-a-japanese-nostalgic-car/ http://www.toyotausamuseum.com/collection/1990_LS400.htm
  6. I discovered this article today, thanks to a member at ClubLexus. I went and made a scan of my copy, thanks to his discovery. I don't suppose it would hurt to post it here:
  7. Here is a copy of the tutorial from an archived version on ClubLexus. As a precaution, make sure you read through everything before attempting. ------ REVISED *For people with some technical knowledge only* Do this at your own risk!* Hi, My name is Rice. I wasn't going to pay $1200 to get my 93 LS 400 Lexus cluster to stop flickering and my gas gauge working again, so here is my permanent fix. It cost me 3 or 4 bucks! Here is my cluster. I just took it out and I'am ready to get to work! The whole job took me 12-15 mins, but I was a technician for like 15 years so please take your time! Back of the cluster. take the white plastic cover off. It is held together with 10 or so screws! I bought these capacitors from Frys electronics. If you don't have a Frys near you then hop your !Removed! on www.Frys.com and order them by the part numbers provided below! The labels with prices and part numbers Unsolder (from the top side) capacitor from c212 that is located on the small board and replace with a 10 uf (10mfd) 16 volt capacitor. Do the same for c142 and c147 located on the big board! C142 is to be replaced with new capacitor 4.7 Uf 25 volt and c147 is to be replaced with 10uf 50 volt. This capacitor is super small: Bend and cut the legs into feet like the one below Now, solder on the new capacitor, but don't burn yourself with the iron! Like the picture below says, I screwed up and ripped off the copper lead by rushing, so I took a probe and scratched the green coating off the board so that I could have a new spot to solder. Take your time, because the copper leads are fragile. You do not want to make this mistake. Looks great and doesn't flicker anymore, cold or hot! I hope I don't make the dudes that charge hella money on eBay mad. As always I had a blast teaching you something new! Thank you for reading! Rice ------ Source: Part 1: https://www.clublexus.com/forums/ls-1st-and-2nd-gen-1990-2000/514164-easy-93-94-ls400-3-00-cluster-flicker-and-gas-needle-fix-6.html#post8949589 Part 2: https://www.clublexus.com/forums/ls-1st-and-2nd-gen-1990-2000/514164-easy-93-94-ls400-3-00-cluster-flicker-and-gas-needle-fix-7.html#post8949597 Part 3: https://www.clublexus.com/forums/ls-1st-and-2nd-gen-1990-2000/514164-easy-93-94-ls400-3-00-cluster-flicker-and-gas-needle-fix-7.html#post8949601
  8. Hello toothguy57, It is possible. Check out this tutorial from LexLS: http://www.lexls.com/tutorials/body/trailerhitch.html The parts needed are linked in the tutorial and will cost around $110. I cannot vouch for myself, but it worked very well for him. Note that you will need to modify some of the car's parts and perform electrical work. A few pieces, such as the lower bumper trim, were modified in the tutorial but could just be left off of the car instead (gives the option to revert to a stock appearance). I would recommend applying tape before cutting surfaces, such as the painted bumper, to prevent peeling or excessive damage. If you're going to be towing very heavy items (like a boat), you may also want to consider a transmission cooler. I don't know of any details regarding the installation for that, but there may be resources around.
  9. Ah, okay. I was confused by the images and thought the car was still damaged. After conducting further research, sites such as Kelley Blue Book value the car at around $4k in 'Good condition,' while an appraisal for a GS Sport design model in 'Very Good condition' is valued near $4.5k. Considering you had the repairs completed and that the job looks like it was done very well, $5k does not sound like a bad asking price. However, I would be hesitant to go below $4k, because basic maintenance (fluids and filters) is relatively inexpensive and the car has low miles. If you list it for $5k or sell it this weekend, you could try to get the buyer to meet you in the middle at $4.5k, while keeping $4k as your lowest price.
  10. Sorry to hear about the accident; hope everyone was okay. I'm not as familiar with the GS models, but I thought I would chime in. I don't know if there are options that are listed to come with the Sports design model, but it would be helpful if you listed what the car is equipped with (optional alloys, leather seats, heated seats, Mark Levinson stereo system, rear spoiler, etc?). Also, how rare is the Sports design model? What makes it different from a regular GS 300? The biggest problem that you have is the front end damage. If someone wants to fix the car, they need to replace at least the front bumper, front bumper trim, hood, and grille. If the damage is bad enough, the radiator fans, radiator, and the radiator core support need to be replaced too. Does the car still drive without overheating? Do you have a picture of the front of the car with the hood open? If the core support is damaged, it could be tough to get beyond $3500 - $4000 for the car, because repairs could be at least $2k-$3k to weld a new support in, replace all of the parts, and blend the paint.
  11. Excellent. Glad to hear you found the culprit. That's very low miles for a Celsior - good find. Keep us posted on your progress.
  12. Okay. If there is no fuel pressure measured, go ahead and check the electronic fuel injection (EFI) fuse and relay in the engine bay fuse box: Here is a diagram of the fuse and relay locations in that box. Note that this diagram is also on the underside of the fuse box cover, which can be removed by unscrewing the two screws that hold it in. If these are good, go ahead and check the wiring that leads to the fuel pump. Here is an electrical diagram for the fuel pump system: See ChrisFix's video that I posted for reference on how to do these troubleshooting procedures if you are not sure.. There are also plenty of resources online for relay, fuse, and wiring testing.
  13. Hi Moarpower, Did you check for fuel pressure? There are a few steps you can take to determine if there is a problem with the wiring, relays, or the fuel pump itself. See this if you don't know how to check for fuel pressure: PROCEDURE 1. Verify the battery voltage is above 12 volts. 2. Disconnect negative (-) terminal cable from the battery. CAUTION: Work must be started after 90 seconds from the time the ignition switch is turned to the LOCK position and the negative (-) terminal cable is disconnected from the battery. 3. Remove the union bolt holding the left hand delivery pipe to the rear fuel pipe. Remove the 2 gaskets. CAUTION: Put a shop towel under the delivery pipe. Slowly loosen the union bolt. 4. Install the rear fuel pipe and pressure gauge to the left hand delivery pipe with 3 new gaskets and the union bolt. (SST 09268-45012) Here are some useful videos for you:
  14. Even if the belt is fine, I would replace the timing belt on any LS 400 that is 1995 or newer. Despite the low mileage, the rubber is 21 years old on that car. 1990-1994 LS 400s had non-interference engines, while 1995+ LS cars have interference engines. This means that if the belt breaks on a 1995+, the pistons could smash the valves in the engine... This would cost a lot more than just taking care of the belt and pulleys. If you have a shop do vehicle maintenance for you, see if you could get the seller to lower the price so you can pay for the job. You might as well consider replacing the water pump too while you're doing the belt, because it's a pain to tear down the engine multiple times.