trev0006

Paul Walker Driving Lexus Lfa With 30K Miles

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He can drive my Lexus ANY TIME HE WANTS!!!

I agree with Chris. Couldn't they have found someplace without a sandstorm??

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And now he is gone.....

:cries:

Seemed like a nice guy. At least he died doing something he loved and didn't suffer with an illness. Goes to prove that even the best drivers can lose control of a car. So sad.

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Sad to hear about the needless death, certainly no place on a public street for this kind of driving that ended 2 lives. Walker was reported to have been a passenger in the Carerra GT at time of death.

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Have they said who the passenger was?

He must have been flying. They said on the news this morning that that model car has the gas tank in the front. Gas tanks don't need to be in the front of a vehicle.

I was totally impressed that Vin Diesel came out and spoke to everybody. I guess they had made so many movies together that they had become good buddies.

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btw - Paul Walker was the passenger.

It seems the news is incorrect (again). The Carerra GT is not like the Boxster/911 with a front mounted fuel tank, the fuel tank is in front of the engine behind the passenger compartment.

This was a horrible crash, impact speed is still TBD. The Carerra GT is a 600+ hp street legal supercar without the electronic nannys such as stability control that we take for granted today. Personally I would not own a mid-engine or rear-engine car without all of the electronic nannys including VSC, TC, ABS, BA, EBD and I would never turn them off.

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OMG!!!! I never realized he was the passenger. I just assumed he was driving.

Who was driving?

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Some of us have been fortunate enough to be able to afford cars that can reach almost 200 mph... but the longer I live, I become more aware of the utter stupidity it takes to use excessive/uncontrollable speed on other than controlled, track conditions.

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Hence, trading a 370Z and a supercharged Z28 for an IS250c.

:cries:

Growing up sucks.

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IMHO, the whole Fast and Furious thing filmed in simulated public road settings is pretty lame.

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Agreed

I can differentiate fact from fantasy, but a 16 year old brain full of testosterone might have trouble doing it. I know in my youth full of '69 Camaros and '68 Chargers....we did pretty much the same thing. I'm not proud of the fact, but we did.

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What baffles me is the fact that these tragic accidents happened from, supposedly, "race car" drivers driving those vehicles. I believe Rodas was a Race car driver. Unless the brakes suddenly did not want to work or anything, I'm sure he could have figured a way to safely stop the vehicle if he lost control. Same thing with the ES350 in San Diego that caused the big commotion about the faulty gas pedals, floor mats, etc on almost all Toyota and certain Lexus vehicles.

Personally I experienced a minor incident where I could have died in a car accident. When I was younger, I was looking for a used vehicle to be my beater commuter car to drive to school. I test drove a used Rav4, the first generation one. At one point I realized that the gas pedal had a problem, and the accelerator was stuck! I had my foot fully depressed on the brake pedal and still didn't want to slow down! Instead, pushing on the brakes only maintained the speed. I had to use the hand brake to slow the vehicle down. When you are in a panic mode, it was hard for me to think about just putting the car in neutral on a busy street with no shoulder to veer off onto. But in reality, I knew that putting it in neutral would help me a lot. Not when you're in panic mode though.

Anyways I managed to use the hand brake to slow down, and pull up into a parking lot with the hand brake pulled up all the way, turned off the ignition and then I put the car in park.

I had this discussion with my friend before. Not to say I'm bragging, but I do have a small 6th sense when it comes to driving, and how to keep myself safe in case of emergency. He told me that if someone else was driving that Rav4, that the first thing a typical person would do is find a car to crash into, or maybe a bush.

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I never understood that situation of the stuck accelerator either. I can see where the driver would have been too panicked to think clearly, but I can't beleive the 911 operator wouldn't have told him to put it in neutral, or better yet, downshift it and slow the car down and let the engine blow. That was such a sad situation. Just awful.

It is funny you mentioned this today. I have to pass an exit ramp every morning where my daughter could have easily been killed. She was saved by an exit sign. She was driving a Honda Civic and it hydroplaned. If she had not T-boned that exit sign, she would have flown off the interstate and it is a good 40-50 foot drop. Probably would have been killed or badly injured....instead, she got a small cut on her arm. Paramedics were on the other side of the interstate and saw the whole thing and came over to help her and her passenger. The car was totalled....she and her friend were fine. God is awesome!

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I am not surprised by the end result of this incident.

Race-car driver reflexes are not effective in this street setting where the fatal crash occurred, because the speeds were way too high for street conditions and environment (like 2x). Had the speeds been more reasonable (not necessarily legal speed), recovery would have been possible. Bad judgment to begin with, bad results in the end.

On a closed course race track the recovery from loss of control can more easily the accomplished before hitting objects (and even then the objects are designed to absorb impact), plus plenty of runout room for recovery.

Yeah, yeah, some of us are fortunate enough to have owned cars/Porsches with top speeds well over 150 mph, not that it matters here. Using that kind of speed in some tight industrial park public road setting with a 40 mph speed limit is not advised.

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Finally watched my Fast and Furious 6 that hubby got me for Christmas. It made me so sad to see Paul. Gosh he loved cars.

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