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New Rear Pads, Rotor, Parking Brake Shoes..


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Just had new rotors, pads and parking brake shoes put on...finally, after 1650000km (I'm the second owner, but I'm pretty sure the pads and rotors or original. That's an indication of how much vehicle braking is handled by the electric motors. Anyway, it was weird that the rear pads were pretty much toast, but there is lots of pad left on the fronts. Normally, this is something I'd do myself (pads and rotors are fairly easy), but I knew the parking brake was not working right and despite me cleaning and lubing everything I still couldn't get one side to hold. I will admit, it was nice to have dirt and grease all over me or bleeding knuckles.

Everything was rusty (damn, I hate living in an area where salt is used on the roads in the winter). I'm only guessing here (being the second owner) but based on the thin parking brake shoes and the grooves inside the rotor hat, I think someone in the past must have driven for some distance with the parking brake engaged. Don't know how one could miss the warning light and chime in the dash....but whatever.

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Hey, did you get any dragging sound on the parking brakes shoes? I still have that intermitant sound no matter how much I adjust the darn things...With it being a hybrid you hear it when going slow.... Also note that the rear disk is not ventilated....On my old RX300 the rears wore out before the front pads did....

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Just had new rotors, pads and parking brake shoes put on...finally, after 1650000km (I'm the second owner, but I'm pretty sure the pads and rotors or original. That's an indication of how much vehicle braking is handled by the electric motors. Anyway, it was weird that the rear pads were pretty much toast, but there is lots of pad left on the fronts. Normally, this is something I'd do myself (pads and rotors are fairly easy), but I knew the parking brake was not working right and despite me cleaning and lubing everything I still couldn't get one side to hold. I will admit, it was nice to have dirt and grease all over me or bleeding knuckles.

Everything was rusty (damn, I hate living in an area where salt is used on the roads in the winter). I'm only guessing here (being the second owner) but based on the thin parking brake shoes and the grooves inside the rotor hat, I think someone in the past must have driven for some distance with the parking brake engaged. Don't know how one could miss the warning light and chime in the dash....but whatever.

That's almost 100,000 miles...I think....wow, that's a lot of miles...I am glad to hear this...I want to keep my 2006 as long as possible. Rey

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That's almost 100,000 miles...I think....wow, that's a lot of miles...I am glad to hear this...I want to keep my 2006 as long as possible. Rey

Just over actually - 100 000 miles is 160 000 kilometres. Mind you, I have needed a new inverter and a new transaxle in that time...lol. Still I like the vehicle.

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Hey, did you get any dragging sound on the parking brakes shoes? I still have that intermitant sound no matter how much I adjust the darn things...With it being a hybrid you hear it when going slow.... Also note that the rear disk is not ventilated....On my old RX300 the rears wore out before the front pads did....

Did you try the adjuster at the parking brake pedal inside the vehicle? If you've adjusted the 'star' adjusters inside the drum and there is still dragging, you can also adjust the cable at the pedal itself. I can scan and post the instructions (I think) if you need them.

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pbrakepedaladjuster.png

Depress the parking brake pedal. Hold the wire adjusting No.1 nut using a wrench and loosen the lock nut.

Release the parking brake pedal.

Turn the wire adjusting No.1 nut until the parking brake pedal travel meets the standard (see below for standard).

Hold the wire adjusting No.1 nut using a wrench or equivalent tool and tighten the lock nut.

Torque:

6.0 N*m{ 61 kgf*cm , 53 in.*lbf }

Count the number of clicks after depressing and releasing the parking brake pedal 3 or 4 times.

Check whether the parking brake drags.

When operating the parking brake pedal, check that the parking brake indicator light comes on.

_____________________________________________

The standard by the way is...

Fully depress the parking brake pedal and release it to engage the parking brake.

Depress the pedal to the floor again, and release it to disengage the parking brake.

Slowly depress the parking brake pedal to the floor, and count the number of clicks.

Standard:

5 to 7 notches at 300 N (31 kgf, 68.3 lbf)

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Are you sure it's not a wheel bearing your hearing? I guess you've already checked by applying the parking brake while you're rolling and seeing if the noise stops as the brake is engaged?

The only other thing I can think of - is the backing plate rubbing againt the rotor as the rotor turns. Sometimes that metal backing plate gets bent in slightly and the rotor can rub against it.

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Are you sure it's not a wheel bearing your hearing? I guess you've already checked by applying the parking brake while you're rolling and seeing if the noise stops as the brake is engaged?

The only other thing I can think of - is the backing plate rubbing againt the rotor as the rotor turns. Sometimes that metal backing plate gets bent in slightly and the rotor can rub against it.

thank you...really appreciate it....

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just had new rotors, pads and parking brake shoes put on...finally, after 1650000km (I'm the second owner, but I'm pretty sure the pads and rotors or original. That's an indication of how much vehicle braking is handled by the electric motors. Anyway, it was weird that the rear pads were pretty much toast, but there is lots of pad left on the fronts. Normally, this is something I'd do myself (pads and rotors are fairly easy), but I knew the parking brake was not working right and despite me cleaning and lubing everything I still couldn't get one side to hold. I will admit, it was nice to have dirt and grease all over me or bleeding knuckles.

Everything was rusty (damn, I hate living in an area where salt is used on the roads in the winter). I'm only guessing here (being the second owner) but based on the thin parking brake shoes and the grooves inside the rotor hat, I think someone in the past must have driven for some distance with the parking brake engaged. Don't know how one could miss the warning light and chime in the dash....but whatever.

In wintertime, say in MT, parking brakes, e-brakes, are often used to "stabilize" the vehicle, prevent the rear from attempting to lead, on long downhill runs.

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  • 5 years later...

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