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Inverter Problems

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I think the lack of comments indicates that this is NOT the epidemic that it was made out to be.

Our 2006 is doing great - no inverter problems so far.

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Or, the lack of response could indicate that nobody knows.

Having had my inverter replaced (it was leaking coolant), and currently suffering a leak of inverter coolant (not from the inverter, but from the tranny area (the electric motors are cooled by the same coolant that cools the inverter), I can say that, yes there were problems. I also know someone personally (i.e. not someone via the internet, but someone I work with) who suffered an inverter failure while driving on the highway.

Have they been fixed? Only Toyota knows for sure. My 400h is an early model - on the road in early 2005 - hopefully, my replacement inverter is a new one that had any internal redesign in it.

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Keep in mind that Lemon lives in an area that gets quite a bit colder than other regions. Perhaps the severe cycling of very cold and very hot engine bay conditions contributed or was fully responsible for his inverter issues? Auto owners who live in parts of Arizona experience a much higher rate of early battery failures than do most of the US. Does this mean that we all should worry about short-lived batteries? No, it just means that temperature extremes tend to shorten the life of many automotive components.

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You'd think (hope? pray?) that Toyota would have considered all the geographical areas that the vehicle was intended to be sold in and done their due diligence in properly testing the vehicle in cold conditions.

Southern Ontario (where I live) is actually further south than many of the northern parts of the northen states, by the way. That's a big chunk of potential owners that might have bought a Toyota hybrid that live where it gets cold.

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Yes, you would think so until you look at all the rusty hardware under many vehicles, rust that is a result of salt-covered roads in areas where there is heavy snowfall.

You would also think that battery manufacturers have tested their products in Arizona on 114 degree days. They probably have but their batteries rarely last more than 3 years under those conditions. Constant exposure to ultraviolet rays quickly crack leather seats and fade dark-colored paints, yet you would think this shouldn't happen anymore. My vehicles last much longer here than do my siblings' vehicles in CT, primarily because the weather is so temperate but also because I cover my metallic red car every time it sits in the sun all day (and that is often). The invincible vehicle simply doesn't exist; it's as simple as that!

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