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2004 Gs300 44K Miles Needs Pads And Rotors

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I bought a used 2004 GS 300 from single owner. It has 44k miles. Dealer maintenance history shows it is quite well maintained. Took it for first oil change to dealer. Dealer tells me it needs all 4 brake pads and rotors. It seems kind of early for rotor replacement. Estimate $1500 for all 4 pads + rotors.

Please advice. I am taking it to Pep boys tommorow for second opinion and estimate. Pep boys estimate over the phone: $700

I feel no problem with brakes.

Please advice.

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check them. take off all the tires and check the pads one by one. as far as the rotors, they could be warped. but yet again i cant teleport there and tell. the only way to find out is to check for yourself. if its on the original pads at 44k, then yes change them.

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You would feel a shimmy when braking if the rotors are warped. Rear brake pads usually last about twice as long as front pads. As I've said many times on this forum, premature brake jobs are the number #1 repair shop scam.

I am not familiar with brake pad life on an 04 GS but the original pads on my 00 LS lasted over 70,000 mies and the rear pads were replaced for the first time at 120,000 miles for my convenience although they likely could have gone to 130,000 miles. Rotors can almost always be turned the trued up at less expense than buying new OEM ones. My 90 LS was on its original rotors when I sold it at 183,000 miles and my 00 LS is on its original rotors at about 131,000 miles and will like last as long (200,000 miles) as I plan to own the car.

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My 98 GS was getting a bit low on front pad thickness at 60k miles and I changed them, but they would have gone further. Still on the originals on the back at 80k miles. For sure there is no need to replace rotors unless they are warped and even then they can be turned at least once.

Bottom line is you need the brakes inspected by someone reliable, either yourself obviously, or an honest mechanic.

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The 2001+ GS models use an electric pump to assist in braking, so worn pads at 44K can easily be true. However, worn rotors seems a bit premature at this stage. Perhaps the former owner was some kind of braking enthousiast, you never know.

If you take a look at the rotors, you likely notice a 'lip' on the outer edge. This lip represents the original thickness of the rotor. When heavily pronounced, the rotors might be out of spec re. minimum thickness. This can be measured and should not be more then +/- 2 or 3 mm's (if I recall correctly). Miminum thickness is sometimes stamped on the hub of the rotor (the rusty part). For reference and when new: front rotor: diam x thickness (in): 11.65 x 1.26. Rear rotor: diam x thickness (in): 12.08 x 0.47.

If you consider turning rotors, make sure to keep an eye on minimum thickness treshold, for safety reasons.

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The 2001+ GS models use an electric pump to assist in braking, so worn pads at 44K can easily be true. However, worn rotors seems a bit premature at this stage. Perhaps the former owner was some kind of braking enthousiast, you never know.

If you take a look at the rotors, you likely notice a 'lip' on the outer edge. This lip represents the original thickness of the rotor. When heavily pronounced, the rotors might be out of spec re. minimum thickness. This can be measured and should not be more then +/- 2 or 3 mm's (if I recall correctly). Miminum thickness is sometimes stamped on the hub of the rotor (the rusty part). For reference and when new: front rotor: diam x thickness (in): 11.65 x 1.26. Rear rotor: diam x thickness (in): 12.08 x 0.47.

If you consider turning rotors, make sure to keep an eye on minimum thickness treshold, for safety reasons.

Just my 2 cent's worth, but as I read the gentleman's original post, my guess is that he is not a do-it-your self'er, and has/is taken his GS to a dealer and a chain shop for estimates because of this. Advice as to what to look for from the mechanics, what to tell them, and what to look out for might be more helpful than getting a jack stand and taking off the tire and so forth.

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The 2001+ GS models use an electric pump to assist in braking, so worn pads at 44K can easily be true.

My 98 has the electric hydro-boost system. Why would boosted brakes cause them to wear faster? Nearly every car today has power brakes of one form or another.

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My 98 has the electric hydro-boost system. Why would boosted brakes cause them to wear faster? Nearly every car today has power brakes of one form or another.

All cars have some form of vacuum powerbooster, but that's not the same as the electric brakepump, implemented into the 2K+ GS models, providing automatic and full hydraulic power to supplement a quick or strong brake-pedal movement. Earlier models didn't have this (electric pump) feature and is noticeable in (less) braking force. In general, people tend to brake harder (and later) with this feature, as it's more easy to do so. Btw, I got that info from my dealer, as they experienced a big difference in longevity of brakepads in cars that do (or do not) have that option.

just my 2 cent's worth, but as I read the gentleman's original post, my guess is that he is not a do-it-your self'er, and has/is taken his GS to a dealer and a chain shop for estimates because of this. Advice as to what to look for from the mechanics, what to tell them, and what to look out for might be more helpful than getting a jack stand and taking off the tire and so forth.

Very true, but a quick look at the rotors (lip) could provide some quick info. If one sees a very pronounced lip (in a technical way that is), it might be more 'convincing' when a mechanic tells or shows him the rotors are done (and you don't have to take the wheels apart to see it). In an attempt to advice, this (and other info) can be a quick and visible clue in relation to a 'second opinion'. Perhaps some info is too technical, but it might help when speaking to a mechanic, as they feel you have some 'knowledge' and therefore are less motivated to 'scam'.

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My 98 has the electric hydro-boost system. Why would boosted brakes cause them to wear faster? Nearly every car today has power brakes of one form or another.

All cars have some form of vacuum powerbooster, but that's not the same as the electric brakepump, implemented into the 2K+ GS models, providing automatic and full hydraulic power to supplement a quick or strong brake-pedal movement. Earlier models didn't have this (electric pump) feature and is noticeable in (less) braking force. In general, people tend to brake harder (and later) with this feature, as it's more easy to do so. Btw, I got that info from my dealer, as they experienced a big difference in longevity of brakepads in cars that do (or do not) have that option.

just my 2 cent's worth, but as I read the gentleman's original post, my guess is that he is not a do-it-your self'er, and has/is taken his GS to a dealer and a chain shop for estimates because of this. Advice as to what to look for from the mechanics, what to tell them, and what to look out for might be more helpful than getting a jack stand and taking off the tire and so forth.

Very true, but a quick look at the rotors (lip) could provide some quick info. If one sees a very pronounced lip (in a technical way that is), it might be more 'convincing' when a mechanic tells or shows him the rotors are done (and you don't have to take the wheels apart to see it). In an attempt to advice, this (and other info) can be a quick and visible clue in relation to a 'second opinion'. Perhaps some info is too technical, but it might help when speaking to a mechanic, as they feel you have some 'knowledge' and therefore are less motivated to 'scam'.

Good points Intaker...and as they say, "Knowledge is everything". Then there is the other side, "A little knowledge is a dangerous thing." A guy can't win!! LOL I think your point of proceeding with as much information as one can glean is best, as long as one understands what they know.

Merry Christmas, Paul

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All of our '98 and later GS's have hydraulic brake boosters, no vacuum booster at all. You are speaking of the brake assist feature, which does indeed boost the hydraulic pressures used in hard braking situations. My concern is that the dealer is mistaken in thinking that this feature in itself causes more rapid brake wear.

But a pad thickness inspection will prove whether or not the OP needs new pads. And we'll have to wait for him to reply I suppose.

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