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Tire Pressure Monitoring System Tpms

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I have a 2009 LS460 which continues to have nuisance alerts on the TPMS. I have judicially monitored tire pressue and always maintain them within spec. The Dash Display for the TPMS never shows an accurate tire pressure. I have had this to a dealer several times and emailed other dealers for opinion. The first response is always to try and sell me a nitrogen tire fill for a bunch of bucks and try to convince me this will solve the problem. This makes no sense to me. The last time I took the car in they claimed they recalibrated the computer and assured me I would not have any alerts unless the pressurs dropped below 31psi. Well that lasted about two weeks then started getting alerts again. The actual tire pressure on all tires was at 34 to 36 psi. I filled all tires to 35 and the spare to 37 and still get alerts on three of the tires. Any suggestions?

Thanks

Don

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I have a 2009 LS460 which continues to have nuisance alerts on the TPMS. I have judicially monitored tire pressue and always maintain them within spec. The Dash Display for the TPMS never shows an accurate tire pressure. I have had this to a dealer several times and emailed other dealers for opinion. The first response is always to try and sell me a nitrogen tire fill for a bunch of bucks and try to convince me this will solve the problem. This makes no sense to me. The last time I took the car in they claimed they recalibrated the computer and assured me I would not have any alerts unless the pressurs dropped below 31psi. Well that lasted about two weeks then started getting alerts again. The actual tire pressure on all tires was at 34 to 36 psi. I filled all tires to 35 and the spare to 37 and still get alerts on three of the tires. Any suggestions?

Thanks

Don

Nitrogen is not the answer, but you have already seen through that.

One of the big mistakes that you are making is believing that the numbers that are displayed on your dash are not accurate. The first thing you need to do is get a high accuracy, high resolution air gauge.

Here is a link to a tire gauge that should suffice: http://www.amazon.com/Moroso-89560-Tire-Pressure-Gauge/dp/B000COS8FI/ref=sr_1_20?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1283284486&sr=1-20

After you get a good tire gauge I will review how to "benchmark" the TPMS.

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$44.61 Seems a little expensive for a tire gage. There are a number of good gages on the market for quite a bit less. The gage can be checked against auto shop gages for accuracy.

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I have had nitrogen in my tires on both my 05 and 2010 ES's. It works very well for me and I only need check the tires when I take it in for an oil change.

Paul

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I have had nitrogen in my tires on both my 05 and 2010 ES's. It works very well for me and I only need check the tires when I take it in for an oil change.

Paul

Paul,

With all due respect, no disrespect intended here, there have been numerous reports, over several years, regarding the marginal advantages of using high nitrogen concentrations to inflate automobile tires. Although there is a slight advantage in the permeation loss- nitrogen was 1.3 psi less loss than air in 12 months in a test by a respected testing authority - that is completely masked by the need for seasonal adjustment unless you live in a climate where the temperature is stable year round.

The only advantage in using nitrogen to inflate tires is to the concern that sells you the gas.

A search of the Internet provides lots of very good information about this. Here is a link to an easy read on this subject: http://blogs.consumerreports.org/cars/2007/10/tires-nitrogen-.html

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I read the report you referenced and I really appreciate the information. I can only say that as I posted earlier, I have used nitrogen in my cars (3) for four years and the problem of constant air migration/permeation has gone away.

Go figure?

Paul

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It's an old post, but I decide to post my experience.

I had the same problem. It was real pain. After purchasing tire pressure gauges and checking tires many tires, I finally came to the conclusion that the sensor was wrong.

I brought my car to the dealer and told them that one of the tire pressure sensor is giving me wrong reading. They did not believe me.

Guess what? The sensor was malfunctioning. I put too much air to turn the light off. It was 10 psi off.

The dealer replaced the sensor for free.

Maybe you should check.

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I hesitate to say it again, but aviation has been using nitrogen in tires for 50 years. The reason is that nitrogen has no moisture in it. Compressed air,unless filtered, contains moisture that over time attacks the steel in the wheels and some belted tires.

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It's an old post, but I decide to post my experience.

I had the same problem. It was real pain. After purchasing tire pressure gauges and checking tires many tires, I finally came to the conclusion that the sensor was wrong.

I brought my car to the dealer and told them that one of the tire pressure sensor is giving me wrong reading. They did not believe me.

Guess what? The sensor was malfunctioning. I put too much air to turn the light off. It was 10 psi off.

The dealer replaced the sensor for free.

Maybe you should check.

Sir,

Having to "put too much air to turn the light off" has nothing to do with the sensor. I think you, and your dealer, are not well informed about how the TPMS works. This seems to be a common problem with dealers not understanding how it works. It sounds like you were experiencing a "mal-benchmarking" problem. Mal-benchmarking can cause two kinds of problems with one being false alarms and the other being the compromise of the low pressure warning. You may still have problems that you don't realize. The TPMS, when operated and maintained properly, is very reliable and provides a great safety feature.

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I hesitate to say it again, but aviation has been using nitrogen in tires for 50 years. The reason is that nitrogen has no moisture in it. Compressed air,unless filtered, contains moisture that over time attacks the steel in the wheels and some belted tires.

Aviation tires go through extreme temperature cycles in some applications, 120 deg F surfaces to -60 degrees F at altitudes of 35,000 ft, something that car tires never experience. Dried air is just as dry as dried Nitrogen for all practical purposes and most car-tire air sources have driers. The main reason that inert gases are required in some aviation tire applications is to insure that there is no Oxygen to support combustion especially at high altitude. I am 70 years old and have worked in the aviation field and have owned a car for many years. I don't recall ever hearing about any concern about moisture attacking tires and wheels of cars from the inside. They just don't last long enough for that to be much of a problem.

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