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SupraMan

Dead A/c On 1996 Es

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My a/c compressor died recently, verified by my mechanic. He wants $800 to replace it and the drier. I can get a fresh rebuilt Denso unit with drier, oil and o-rings for $150 delivered. I know that there will be no gas evacuation recycle because I don't have that equipment. Other than that, is it just a simple raise up the car; drop the undershield; take off compressor and drier and replace components? I think I need a pro to flush it then and recharge system.This should save over $600 for me for a couple hours work. Any comments from HVAC certified members? Thanks in advance for your help.

:cheers:

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The pro flush is to clean out any garbage that the failed compressor may have left in there. Ideally you want to run the flush BEFORE you put ne new parts in, while the system is all apart. Also keep in mind that if there are any problems with the new compressor, IE it fails shortly after install, the shop will not warranty it.

Also if you do your own work, do not forget to add the proper amount of oil to the compressor, and oil the orings before you install them.

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Thanks GJ! I wasn't clear when I wrote this, knowing a full system flush is needed BEFORE new parts are added. Any idea of a ballpark figure on the system flush? I'm going to add 20cc of PAG-46. The rest just seems a simple mechanical swap, with special attention to keeping contaminants out of the lines during the process. then going back to the shop for a vacuum system then fill.

I found this illustrated how to: http://www.scribd.com/doc/19394743/1997-Lexus-ES-300-FSM-Section-11a-Air-Conditioning. Shows all sorts of ES HVAC stuff. Pg. 1590-1601 covers it all for my a/c.

:cheers:

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Thanks GJ! I wasn't clear when I wrote this, knowing a full system flush is needed BEFORE new parts are added. Any idea of a ballpark figure on the system flush? I'm going to add 20cc of PAG-46. The rest just seems a simple mechanical swap, with special attention to keeping contaminants out of the lines during the process. then going back to the shop for a vacuum system then fill.

I found this illustrated how to: http://www.scribd.com/doc/19394743/1997-Lexus-ES-300-FSM-Section-11a-Air-Conditioning. Shows all sorts of ES HVAC stuff. Pg. 1590-1601 covers it all for my a/c.

:cheers:

Flush is definitely recommended. If you have an air compressor w/ a nozzle, you can buy the flush chemical at autozone or advance for $10, pour it into the lines and then blow it through (one to the condensor, one to the evaoprator) w/ the compressor until it comes back clear. Some manuals suggest using a "flush gun," but I've never found anything like it for sale anywhere. You can get a fairly decent air compressor for about $100 at Harbor Fright, or Northern Tool, and this is about what a mechanic would charge you to flush. It's often recommended to replace the expansion valve as well, but I've gotten away w/out doing this in the past. Otherwise, you're right it's just a simple swap out of the compressor. Make sure you get the right kind of o rings, regular ones will deteriorate, but they sell the green ones at the auto stores if you look hard enough for them. Trying to find the right size is tricky, but there's some wiggle room in this regard. If you've got a garage guy to evacuate the system, he may be able to blow it out as well, and if he's a good guy, will recharge the system when you got the new compressor in for minimal bucks. r12 available at biglots for $5 a can recently.

Lexis

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LL, thanks for great advice. I'm looking for that new garage guy now; mine likes running the billing clock like most. I think my swap time on the compressor and drier will be well under 3 hours with just basic tools utilized. That gives me +/- $200/hour for my contribution! I'll keep you folks posted.

:cheers:

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If your handy enough to replace the components, you can get the vacuum pump from Autozone and the guages....then its a matter of cleaning it out, triple evacuating it.. sucking in the oil... adding the gas... and your good to go...

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