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mattbys

Where Is My Ps Fluid Going?

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I would suggest that you order the part from a Toyota dealer and then have an independent mechanic install it.

The valve is rather hard to access. It is in the bottom of the PS pump reservoir.

I had my ACV changed on my 93 LS about this time last year. It stopped my PS fluid loss completely.

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FYI-I changed out the ACV on my 94LS 2 months ago, and the fluid loss stopped. It wasn't that hard of a job to DIY-just need a 6" open end wrench and some muscle power. Note that I changed the valve even though I could not find evidence of fluid in the 2 rubber lines.

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thanks for the help guys,

I took it to my mechanic, who doesn't charge anything for inspections, thus the 2 hr. wait, but he said that the valve is not the issue, and that I should get a new rack and pinion steering solenoid. Also, he recommended that I buy a new one, not a used one, and that he would charge me $40 to install it. Would you guys be able to recommend a good site? Do you think that the rack and pinion steering solenoid could be it? A friend of mine mentioned that they have this "unleakable" power steering fluid, but I could not find anything on it.

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I just ordered a 1991 Lexus LS400 With Solenoid (EVO)Power Steering Rack for $275 :chairshot:

http://www.carsteering.com/partsdisplay.as...modelname=LS400

I realize that I might have gone a little overboard on this, but my girlfriend said that she would split the bill with me cuz I gave her my 96 alty. I'll let y'all know what happens, but I feel like I might have jumped the gun to order the part...

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Independent shop mechanics rarely have LS400 specific experience. So.....

Your mechanic probably doesn't know there is a steering rack solenoid filter screen that needs to be kept clean http://www.saber.net/~monarch/solenoid3.jpg

to avoid the pressure buildups that cause system leaks to begin with.

And your mechanic probably doesn't know there is a filter screen inside the power steering pump reservoir that needs to be kept clean http://www.saber.net/~monarch/solenoid3.jpg to avoid the pressure buildups that cause system leaks to begin with.

And your mechanic probably doesn't know the air valve on all 1st generation LS400's needs to be replaced because virtually all leak after 10 years.

http://www.saber.net/~monarch/airvalvea.jpg

And your mechanic probably doesn't know that the power steering pump itself may leak due to worn seals and the pressure buildups caused by clogged screens. The pump either has to be resealed using a Lexus reseal kit or a new / rebuilt pump installed.

Bottom line: Installing a new steering rack is a last resort and likely isn't the source or only souce of fluid leakage.

The ONLY fluid approved for use in Lexus power steerring systems is Dexron II or III Automatic Transmission Fluid.

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I had actually shown him both of those pictures, and he showed me that the screen is actually pretty clean. He recommended the part that I ordered because he said that it comes with a brand new steering rack solenoid filter screen and a new solenoid, as to cover all the bases and not to order parts later. Do you guys think that was sound judgement on his part?

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Your first post was about "missing power steering fluid" and we are telling you the chances the the leak will be completely fixed by just replacing the steering rack are very small. The rack is the most expensive part of the whole system so that's why it's the key part the $mechanics$ like to replace. They don't like just cleaning screens because all they can earn from that is a little pocket change.

If you don't replace the air valve you could end up a continuing leak plus blue smoke coming out the exhaust pipe and possibly harming the oxygen sensor and catalytic converter.

And if there is a PS fluid leak from either the PS pump and / or air valve you could find yourself stranded because fluid commonly leaks down onto the alternator and shorts it out.

So from both a financial and car reliability standpoint is makes sense to clean the two screens and replace the air valve first then see if all the system leaks go away. If not, next step is to reseal or replace the PS pump. Leaks from the rack itself after all this other stuff has been done are rare.

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Do you mean automatic transmission fluid by saying ATF? But I cann't figure out how this fluid can come to engine part.

thats exactly what he means and when he sees this post he will be able to explain the why better than i could

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Do you mean automatic transmission fluid by saying ATF? But I cann't figure out how this fluid can come to engine part.

thats exactly what he means and when he sees this post he will be able to explain the why better than i could

finally-all yu need to do to fix all these problems-

go to your local steering pump professional repair shops-get several quotes from different ones-have steer pump and steering rack both reconditioned- all problems fixed-let them do remove and replace as well-cost in Aus was about $400 for the pump and $600 for the rack-best grand you will spend on a Lex.Pump and rack work very hard on these cars-fluid gets very hot,hence heavy wear on high mileage cars. Mine is still spot on and not a drop leaked in 6 months and 8000km since.

cheers

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It's been a year since I took off the 2 vacuum hoses and plugged the tubes they connect to. I have not noticed a difference in steering.

No more white puff of smoke but PS fluid keeps seeping 'through' the plug (or plugs) on the air control valve. I have to top off the reservoir every 2 weeks.

I bought a new ACV from irontoad.com and stubby combo wrenches as recommended on another thread. I can't find space to work the wrench (17mm). It hits the metal tube on the pressure port on one side and hits the alternator on the other.

I will now relax as my sore hands recuperate and decide if I will take off the alternator, unsrew the pressure port to move the metal tube or just seal the ACV tubes.

One more thing I learned today. Amazing. Taking off the belt is really easy - nothing to unscrew.

...6 months after...

I finally rolled my sleeves and took the bolts off the alternator. Not all the way but enough to work my 17mm wrenches to replace the air control valve. It's been a week now and no more leaks. Yipee!!!

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Ok,

I know this has been talked ab out over and over.

I have got a leak... It doesn't go on the alternator. My trustee mechanic we have used for years and years says its the rack, quoted $600 for the part 300 for th labor..

He says not to do it and just refill it every month bc its not hurting anything....

Any input?

he said he checked over every other potential problem, and the pump itself is fine!

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so those who fixed their ACV problem and have no leaks..did you folks try it with those 2 hoses connected and disconnected?

what were the results of both attempts?

thanks

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Ok,

I know this has been talked ab out over and over.

I have got a leak... It doesn't go on the alternator. My trustee mechanic we have used for years and years says its the rack, quoted $600 for the part 300 for th labor..

He says not to do it and just refill it every month bc its not hurting anything....

Any input?

he said he checked over every other potential problem, and the pump itself is fine!

Matt...do a search for the "steering solenoid" cleaning thread. You will see pictures and so forth. I recommend you do this proceedure, as it's not very hard, and will HELP tremendously to ease the pressure build up in your system, as well as return the original steering feel to your car. It gives you the one-finger steering back. My rack, on the passenger side, had a small leak as well, until I did this proceedure "took maybe an hour". I haven't had a single drop since. And my steering is very easy now.

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Did that, and tes it turns so nice now. I went and got my tranny flushed and the guy told me I have a leak, maybe he just saw the flow from when it used to. Thanks for the reply

Ok,

I know this has been talked ab out over and over.

I have got a leak... It doesn't go on the alternator. My trustee mechanic we have used for years and years says its the rack, quoted $600 for the part 300 for th labor..

He says not to do it and just refill it every month bc its not hurting anything....

Any input?

he said he checked over every other potential problem, and the pump itself is fine!

Matt...do a search for the "steering solenoid" cleaning thread. You will see pictures and so forth. I recommend you do this proceedure, as it's not very hard, and will HELP tremendously to ease the pressure build up in your system, as well as return the original steering feel to your car. It gives you the one-finger steering back. My rack, on the passenger side, had a small leak as well, until I did this proceedure "took maybe an hour". I haven't had a single drop since. And my steering is very easy now.

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It's been a year since I took off the 2 vacuum hoses and plugged the tubes they connect to. I have not noticed a difference in steering.

No more white puff of smoke but PS fluid keeps seeping 'through' the plug (or plugs) on the air control valve. I have to top off the reservoir every 2 weeks.

I bought a new ACV from irontoad.com and stubby combo wrenches as recommended on another thread. I can't find space to work the wrench (17mm). It hits the metal tube on the pressure port on one side and hits the alternator on the other.

I will now relax as my sore hands recuperate and decide if I will take off the alternator, unsrew the pressure port to move the metal tube or just seal the ACV tubes.

One more thing I learned today. Amazing. Taking off the belt is really easy - nothing to unscrew.

...6 months after...

I finally rolled my sleeves and took the bolts off the alternator. Not all the way but enough to work my 17mm wrenches to replace the air control valve. It's been a week now and no more leaks. Yipee!!!

So the only way to replace the ACV is to remove the alternator bolts? Is this done from above or below? I read in another thread that to replace the ACV it has to be done from below. I'm debating whether to just replace the whole pump or try the ACV first. I have to put more fluid about every 5 days (she's very thirsty <_< ) and get the white/blue smoke after most starts.

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AzHotLS, Your only going to want to replace the ACV if it's actually the culprit of your problems. Are you losing P/S fluid that you can't explain? No, I've replaced my ACV with my P/S pump still attached. Thanks to my universal sockets...I love Snap-On.

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Independent shop mechanics rarely have LS400 specific experience. So.....

Your mechanic probably doesn't know there is a steering rack solenoid filter screen that needs to be kept clean http://www.saber.net/~monarch/solenoid3.jpg

to avoid the pressure buildups that cause system leaks to begin with.

And your mechanic probably doesn't know there is a filter screen inside the power steering pump reservoir that needs to be kept clean http://www.saber.net/~monarch/solenoid3.jpg to avoid the pressure buildups that cause system leaks to begin with.

And your mechanic probably doesn't know the air valve on all 1st generation LS400's needs to be replaced because virtually all leak after 10 years.

http://www.saber.net/~monarch/airvalvea.jpg

And your mechanic probably doesn't know that the power steering pump itself may leak due to worn seals and the pressure buildups caused by clogged screens. The pump either has to be resealed using a Lexus reseal kit or a new / rebuilt pump installed.

Bottom line: Installing a new steering rack is a last resort and likely isn't the source or only souce of fluid leakage.

The ONLY fluid approved for use in Lexus power steerring systems is Dexron II or III Automatic Transmission Fluid.

Hi Guys

Are these pictures available anywhere else? I'm getting a 'not found' message

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Hi Guys

Are these pictures available anywhere else? I'm getting a 'not found' message

This Help!, Good news. Bad news. thread has solenoid filter screen pic links that work.

This long (but excellent) thread Flushed Power Steering, Cleaned Solenoid Screen, Now LS whines, leaks, and steers hard at low speeds includes links for the pump reservoir screen. If you get caught up in the saga be sure to click the link in the last post for the conclusion. If you really could not care less, then here are the Reservoir Pics.

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The best thing about having the missing P/S fluid problem is that it does help to keep the fluid clean, since it causes the fluid to slowly suck away, and makes the owner replace the old fluid with fresh stuff.

I replaced the ACV 2 years ago. The fluid still looks red and happy. Replacing the ACV is easy. Do it before replacing the pump.

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Hi guy's,

Just thought I would add my two cents on this issue. I changed my PS Pump and Alternator

on my wifes 91 LS400 a few days ago. As stated by almost everyone, I too had a leak as well

as Air Control Valve problems. I elected not to change the ACV but to plug it.

This is where my experience gets :censored: . I pluged the two ports on the ACV with caps

and Hose clamps but they kept being blown off after a day or so. I then reinstalled the original

lines and plugged the lines where they attached on the top of the engine. This also did not work

as the lines continued to be blown off at the ACV.

Finally today I removed the ACV completely and plugged the attach point with a 14mm x 1.5 Oil

Pan plug with plenty of High Temp Oil Resistant RTV. This finally appears to have stopped my

leak.

My question is, does anyone know what kind of pressures are produced by the Power Steering Pump?

This pump would just blow these lines right off the nipples even with spring clamps installed.

Note: Yes the ACV can be removed and reinstalled from the top side without removing the PS Pump

pully. It does help to removed the Air Filter housing and loosen the return line support and move

the return line out of the way to improve access. I removed the Pressure line from the bottom of

the PS Pump and this made it a snap to remove the ACV as you can work from the front of the

pump area.

Good Luck, Bryan

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I have the same problem on my 92 LS, If I only Plug the two lines (the one on the engine and air intake part) will this eliminate the "white puff" when starting the engine? eventually (a week or so) I'll try and get the ACV replaced. is there anything else I should consider? thanks.

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I have the same problem on my 92 LS, If I only Plug the two lines (the one on the engine and air intake part) will this eliminate the "white puff" when starting the engine? eventually (a week or so) I'll try and get the ACV replaced. is there anything else I should consider? thanks.

Have you cleaned the screen on your rack solenoid?? If not, you may just blow out your new ACV and stress out other components in the system (hight pressure hose and steering rack seals). Pressure build-up from a plugged screen could have caused the ACV to be first to fail. Once failed, there is no way to keep high pressure fluid from leaking thru to the engine (if the hoses are connected) or onto the alternator (if the valve is "plugged").

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I'm living this thread, literally. 1990 LS400 245K, in excellent shape, no dents, clean inside and out, and runs like a sleeping baby. In early January I was going to buy a used Camry when I saw it being worked on and readied for sale. They were changing the timing belt and water pump. After the work I test drove it and fell in love, pronto.

In late Feb car dies on me and gets towed to mech. It would start but won't turn...as if there's no gas in it. They said it was fuel pump, then it wasn't. Said it was cam position sensor, then it wasn't. It wasn't the crank position sensor either. All kinds of diagnostic stuff wouldn't tell. Then I called in a friend, an electronics expert. In 20 minutes, he showed it wasn't fuel pump - had me crank ignition for a quick second and said gas was flowing. Looked at the fuses and it was the EFI (20A) yellow fuse. Darn! For this the car had sat in the shop for a week. I wasn't charged a cent and the shop owner fired the mechanic who'd worked on my car.

On Sun. 3/11 car dies on me on the NJ's GS Pkwy. The dashboard lights had been coming on/off for a few days but I was too busy. My buddy comes and says its the battery or alternator, jumps me and we drive home.

I'd started reading this site and thread when I bought the car and knew I had a PS fluid problem, including the white smoke business...but I digress.

We put the car on ramps and I bought a new alternator after we confirmed thats the problem. Then we had the big snow storm and had to wait. Warnock Lexus wanted $350 for a remanuf unit but I got one with a lifetime warranty for $182 elsewhere. We replaced the alternator, but would you believe I forgot about replacing ACV and vacuum hoses, while we had the old alternator out? Well, I got the ACV (irontoad.com $72+s/h) and hoses and got right to work. As you might imagine, having already replaced the alternator, we were loathe to remove it again to get easy access to the ACV. We didn't have the specialized 17mm wrench to boot.

Anyway, to make a long story short, I forgot to disconnect battery terminals, started removing the

ACV and shorted alternator. The 120 Amp bolted fuse went. Replaced it. I now have new ACV and vacuum hoses. Car drove well all day with no problems yesterday till late afternoon then I saw the lights flicker briefly and then again after about 30 mins, it happened again. I checked it this morning and battery voltage was at 14.5 volts with engine running. Alternator good, no dashboard alarms. After about 5 minutes I checked again and all dashboard light alarms had come on. Voltage was down to 11.9 and diagnostic equipment said alternator was no good.

I suspect we short circuited the alternating with the incident. What do you think?

Thanks for reading my long winded piece. ;)

R

UPDATE: 3/22/07

Took altie back to shop (BuyWise, Vauxhall, NJ) and exchanged it. Has a lifetime warranty. Replaced it. Driven over one hundred miles today and all is excellent. No blinking dashboard lights or funny noises. Wish me luck!

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