jr1000a

Starter Won't Stop

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Went to start my 94 LS400 and it wouldn't even click. Battery is fully charged. 7.5 starter fuse was blown. replaced, and blew again. for test purposes, put a wire in it's place. Starter turned over and wouldn't stop. Pulled wire and it kept turning. Pulled starter relay to get it to stop. Contacts are open on relay until I plug it in. Doesn't matter if ignition switch is on, or even has the key in, now. I am thinking ignition switch and hoping it's not starter or solenoid. I can turn ignition switch to on, install relay temporarily and start the car. It runs normally, but all indicator lights stay on and white lights, (speedo, tach, fuel gauge) stay off. Help.

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Solenoid is shorted across the contacts, keeping the gear drive engaged. Mine did that two years ago after a beer festival. You can dissect the battery terminal wiring and take the starter lead off the positive terminal (leave the rest of the wiring), turn the key on, then just tap the starter lead to the terminal enough to get it started, then take it off so it's not still running the solenoid, this is if you need to move/drive it. Otherwise, pull the starter off and have it rebuilt/replaced.

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Solenoid is shorted across the contacts, keeping the gear drive engaged. Mine did that two years ago after a beer festival. You can dissect the battery terminal wiring and take the starter lead off the positive terminal (leave the rest of the wiring), turn the key on, then just tap the starter lead to the terminal enough to get it started, then take it off so it's not still running the solenoid, this is if you need to move/drive it. Otherwise, pull the starter off and have it rebuilt/replaced.

Thanks. Did I read correctly that most of the top part of the engine has to come off to get the starter off? I don't have a problem doing that, I did the timing belt/water pump full tuneup a year ago, I just hope I read wrong, or that there is a shortcut of some sort.

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Yes, you read correctly. The intake manifold has to be removed and the starter bolts are somewhat difficult to access The starter is cradled between the cylinder heads at the top of the engine instead of "typical" starter placement at the bottom of the bellhousing. So, its a pain to R&R. Lots of threads on this subject. Do a thorough search and you should have more info than you wanted. :wacko: Best of luck.

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I put the new starter in and would have had it done in one day. Before installing the intake, I reconnected the battery and put the relay back in, starter started cranking again with no key or fuse. I stopped working on it for two weeks just to shake it off. I went ahead and finished putting it back together, and am able to put the relay back in without the starter cranking. At least now, I am back to square one where the engine isn't cranking, but the fuse pops as soon as I turn the key to the start position. I am tracing wires and checking components in the circuit. Also, I love my car, but I think we need to hunt down the engineer that designed the external components of the engine, and have him personally change every starter on every LS400 on the road. If anyone is interested, I will post my experience and some recommendations that might help make the replacement a little less difficult.

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So, you initially put the new starter in, old relay in, and it started cranking w/o the ignition key turned? And the 7.5a fuse was installed and did not blow?

I would start by obtaining a schematic. I don't not have one for the 94 LS400. But I would do a simple test with the relay out. If you have an ohm meter, find the coil terminals of the relay and connect one of them +12v and the other to gnd. Does the relay click? Do you get continuity on/off from the other two contact terminals?

Then, with the relay still out, measure the resistance of the starter solenoid coil by connecting the ohmmeter from one side of the relay contact pin (in the terminal block) and ground.

To determine which pin this is, first use the voltmeter to find the +12v side of the contact, then choose the other pin. Let us know the resistance and relay test results.

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