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davidditt

P1130, P1135

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After all the help I've recieved maybe I can help a little. I have 189,000 miles on my RX300 and have been getting the p1130,p1135 error for about 60,000. The car seemed to run okay so I didn't worry about it. About 5,000 ago it started running a little rough and I started looking through this forum hoping for answers. From what I saw it was the rear Bank 1 Sensor 1 A/F. Seemed like it was a real problem to change so I didn't attempt it until it started runnning really badly. Push down on the gas, it seemed to slow down instead of speed up etc. Anyway it took me less time to change out the sensor than it did to jack up the car. Everyone seemed to have a real issue disconnecting the plug attached to the sensor without help or a wedged screw driver. I unscrewed the sensor from underneath, got a coat hanger with a hook on the end, reached in on the left side of the intake manifold, hooked the sensor and pulled it up to where my left hand could reach it. You can easily reach the plug on the right side of the intake, push down the plug realease, grap the sensor on the right side a pull. Anyway, hopefully this helps someone.

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After all the help I've recieved maybe I can help a little. I have 189,000 miles on my RX300 and have been getting the p1130,p1135 error for about 60,000. The car seemed to run okay so I didn't worry about it. About 5,000 ago it started running a little rough and I started looking through this forum hoping for answers. From what I saw it was the rear Bank 1 Sensor 1 A/F. Seemed like it was a real problem to change so I didn't attempt it until it started runnning really badly. Push down on the gas, it seemed to slow down instead of speed up etc. Anyway it took me less time to change out the sensor than it did to jack up the car. Everyone seemed to have a real issue disconnecting the plug attached to the sensor without help or a wedged screw driver. I unscrewed the sensor from underneath, got a coat hanger with a hook on the end, reached in on the left side of the intake manifold, hooked the sensor and pulled it up to where my left hand could reach it. You can easily reach the plug on the right side of the intake, push down the plug realease, grap the sensor on the right side a pull. Anyway, hopefully this helps someone.

Thanks for saving me a few tools thrown across the garage. With your right thumb, press down on the plug release on top until you hear a slight click. If you don't, you're worried about pulling too hard on the wires. Visually note how the plug is positioned and orient the new plug in the same way. I have a service pit so getting to the sensor was easy. O'Reilly parts manager says their system shows this part as an O2 sensor. So their are not two different parts. O2 sensor and A/F ratio sensor are the same thing. Lucky my search landed on this post.

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Thanks for saving me a few tools thrown across the garage. With your right thumb, press down on the plug release on top until you hear a slight click. If you don't, you're worried about pulling too hard on the wires. Visually note how the plug is positioned and orient the new plug in the same way. I have a service pit so getting to the sensor was easy. O'Reilly parts manager says their system shows this part as an O2 sensor. So their are not two different parts. O2 sensor and A/F ratio sensor are the same thing. Lucky my search landed on this p

ost.

No, the A/F ratio sensor and the O2 sensor are actually 2 very different parts, and your car has both. The A/F ratio sensors are on each bank of the engine (2). The O2 sensor is behind the catalytic convertor under the drivers seat area (below the floor pan). The PROBLEM is, the parts industry (and maybe even the dealer or manufacturer) have very much confused the picture by calling (and even listing in the parts book) an A/F ratio sensor an oxygen sensor (O2) which it IS NOT! They are 2 very much different parts (that just happen to look a lot alike) and are very definitely NOT interchangeable!

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Thanks for saving me a few tools thrown across the garage. With your right thumb, press down on the plug release on top until you hear a slight click. If you don't, you're worried about pulling too hard on the wires. Visually note how the plug is positioned and orient the new plug in the same way. I have a service pit so getting to the sensor was easy. O'Reilly parts manager says their system shows this part as an O2 sensor. So their are not two different parts. O2 sensor and A/F ratio sensor are the same thing. Lucky my search landed on this p

ost.

No, the A/F ratio sensor and the O2 sensor are actually 2 very different parts, and your car has both. The A/F ratio sensors are on each bank of the engine (2). The O2 sensor is behind the catalytic convertor under the drivers seat area (below the floor pan). The PROBLEM is, the parts industry (and maybe even the dealer or manufacturer) have very much confused the picture by calling (and even listing in the parts book) an A/F ratio sensor an oxygen sensor (O2) which it IS NOT! They are 2 very much different parts (that just happen to look a lot alike) and are very definitely NOT interchangeable!

No, sorry, but these days (since ~92[?]) all oxygen sensors are the SAME, they're just used for different purposes/reasons. The "front" oxygen sensor(s) are used for controlling the A/F mixture during light engine loads, loading, idle or constant speed cruising. The "rear" oxygen sensor(s) are used to determine if the catalyst is still operating efficiently.

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After all the help I've recieved maybe I can help a little. I have 189,000 miles on my RX300 and have been getting the p1130,p1135 error for about 60,000. The car seemed to run okay so I didn't worry about it. About 5,000 ago it started running a little rough and I started looking through this forum hoping for answers. From what I saw it was the rear Bank 1 Sensor 1 A/F. Seemed like it was a real problem to change so I didn't attempt it until it started runnning really badly.

Push down on the gas, it seemed to slow down instead of speed up etc.

Anyway it took me less time to change out the sensor than it did to jack up the car. Everyone seemed to have a real issue disconnecting the plug attached to the sensor without help or a wedged screw driver. I unscrewed the sensor from underneath, got a coat hanger with a hook on the end, reached in on the left side of the intake manifold, hooked the sensor and pulled it up to where my left hand could reach it. You can easily reach the plug on the right side of the intake, push down the plug realease, grap the sensor on the right side a pull. Anyway, hopefully this helps someone.

Driving those 60,000 miles without the proper feedback for controlling the A/F mixture might have very well compromised the catalyst in your catalytic converter. The honeycomb structure breaks off in chunks and will often partially BLOCK the exhaust flow.

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No, sorry, but these days (since ~92[?]) all oxygen sensors are the SAME, they're just used for different purposes/reasons. The "front" oxygen sensor(s) are used for controlling the A/F mixture during light engine loads, loading, idle or constant speed cruising. The "rear" oxygen sensor(s) are used to determine if the catalyst is still operating efficiently.

Pray tell Jaswood, where did you come up with that information??? I have been down that road and I stand by what I said, the A/F ratio sensors (two) and the Oxygen sensor (there is only one) are NOT the same thing. Why don't you buy a couple of Oxygen sensors (they're a whole lot cheaoer than A/F ratio sensors) and put them in place of the A/F ratio sensors (they will fit!) and see how that works out for ya. While you're at it (hav'in fun that is, put one of the A/F ratio sensors in place of the Oxygen sensor behind the Cat Conv.) Let us know how this experiment works out for ya. Ought to be interesting!

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No, sorry, but these days (since ~92[?]) all oxygen sensors are the SAME, they're just used for different purposes/reasons. The "front" oxygen sensor(s) are used for controlling the A/F mixture during light engine loads, loading, idle or constant speed cruising. The "rear" oxygen sensor(s) are used to determine if the catalyst is still operating efficiently.

Pray tell Jaswood, where did you come up with that information??? I have been down that road and I stand by what I said, the A/F ratio sensors (two) and the Oxygen sensor (there is only one) are NOT the same thing. Why don't you buy a couple of Oxygen sensors (they're a whole lot cheaoer than A/F ratio sensors) and put them in place of the A/F ratio sensors (they will fit!) and see how that works out for ya. While you're at it (hav'in fun that is, put one of the A/F ratio sensors in place of the Oxygen sensor behind the Cat Conv.) Let us know how this experiment works out for ya. Ought to be interesting!

The 4 oxygen sensors in my '95 LS400 are exactly the same, the only real difference is that the heating capability is not used in the rear ones. I suppose it might be that someone makes rear ones, cheaper, that do not include the heating element.

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No, sorry, but these days (since ~92[?]) all oxygen sensors are the SAME, they're just used for different purposes/reasons. The "front" oxygen sensor(s) are used for controlling the A/F mixture during light engine loads, loading, idle or constant speed cruising. The "rear" oxygen sensor(s) are used to determine if the catalyst is still operating efficiently.

The 4 oxygen sensors in my '95 LS400 are exactly the same, the only real difference is that the heating capability is not used in the rear ones. I suppose it might be that someone makes rear ones, cheaper, that do not include the heating element.

Jaswood- the 1st A/F ratio sensors that I am aware of in anything Toyota made was in '97 and by '99 the were in a lot more of T/L models. There are still vehicles today that DO NOT use A/F ratio sensors. They are normally about 3 to 4 times as expensive as Oxygen sensors. And they ARE NOT the same thing, not by a long shot. Your '95 predates even the use of A/F sensors in ANYTHING that I'm aware of.

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No, sorry, but these days (since ~92[?]) all oxygen sensors are the SAME, they're just used for different purposes/reasons. The "front" oxygen sensor(s) are used for controlling the A/F mixture during light engine loads, loading, idle or constant speed cruising. The "rear" oxygen sensor(s) are used to determine if the catalyst is still operating efficiently.

The 4 oxygen sensors in my '95 LS400 are exactly the same, the only real difference is that the heating capability is not used in the rear ones. I suppose it might be that someone makes rear ones, cheaper, that do not include the heating element.

Jaswood- the 1st A/F ratio sensors that I am aware of in anything Toyota made was in '97 and by '99 the were in a lot more of T/L models. There are still vehicles today that DO NOT use A/F ratio sensors. They are normally about 3 to 4 times as expensive as Oxygen sensors. And they ARE NOT the same thing, not by a long shot. Your '95 predates even the use of A/F sensors in ANYTHING that I'm aware of.

Some sort of confusion factor going on here.

I have to go look at my '92 LS400 factory shop/repair manuals to be sure but off the top of my head it seems to me that it also used 4 oxygen sensors. The front 2 sensors, upstream of the catalyst, are used for controlling the A/F mixture, stoichiometric mixture, for idle and cruise, low engine loading, and the 2nd set downstream of the catalyst to monitor catalyst efficiency.

I suspect what has happened in the interim is that the front oxygen sensors are now more commonly referred to as A/F sensors. The only change to those front oxygen sensors that I am aware of was the addition of self-heating to shorten the sensor detection response time when a cold engine is first started.

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Hi all, just reading the comments unders this topic

I'm in the same situation - my check engine light came on on a 1999 RX300 (137k miles), took it to Auto Zone and they came up with a P1130 and P1135. Tracked it down to a Air Fuel Sensor Malfunction (Bank 1, Sensor 1)

I've order the part online, but I;m trying to figure out where it is and how to change it.

Anyone has any pictures to share or a manual on how to find it and change it, would be greatly appreciated

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No, sorry, but these days (since ~92[?]) all oxygen sensors are the SAME, they're just used for different purposes/reasons. The "front" oxygen sensor(s) are used for controlling the A/F mixture during light engine loads, loading, idle or constant speed cruising. The "rear" oxygen sensor(s) are used to determine if the catalyst is still operating efficiently.

The 4 oxygen sensors in my '95 LS400 are exactly the same, the only real difference is that the heating capability is not used in the rear ones. I suppose it might be that someone makes rear ones, cheaper, that do not include the heating element.

Jaswood- the 1st A/F ratio sensors that I am aware of in anything Toyota made was in '97 and by '99 the were in a lot more of T/L models. There are still vehicles today that DO NOT use A/F ratio sensors. They are normally about 3 to 4 times as expensive as Oxygen sensors. And they ARE NOT the same thing, not by a long shot. Your '95 predates even the use of A/F sensors in ANYTHING that I'm aware of.

Some sort of confusion factor going on here.

I have to go look at my '92 LS400 factory shop/repair manuals to be sure but off the top of my head it seems to me that it also used 4 oxygen sensors. The front 2 sensors, upstream of the catalyst, are used for controlling the A/F mixture, stoichiometric mixture, for idle and cruise, low engine loading, and the 2nd set downstream of the catalyst to monitor catalyst efficiency.

I suspect what has happened in the interim is that the front oxygen sensors are now more commonly referred to as A/F sensors. The only change to those front oxygen sensors that I am aware of was the addition of self-heating to shorten the sensor detection response time when a cold engine is first started.

Jaswood- Did you bother to read the entire Denso description??? They clearly explain the difference between the two, O2 sensor as compared to A/f ratio sensor. There is a reason that an A/F ratio sensor is called that, to differentiate between it and an O2 sensor. They are clearly different parts. One WILL NOT work in the place of the other. There is a reason why one costs 4 times what the other does, and it's not called "increased profit"! That's the reason I told you to try switching places on a vehicle that uses both. This is probably not true on your '95, but it is definitely true after they started usinf A/F ratio sensors. They are called "wide band sensors" whereas the O2 sensors are called "narrow band sensors". If you do have ANY intertest in actually learning, there is plenty on the internet that will explain EXACTLY how they work, and the difference between the two. It's obvious you aren't interested in learning, so I officially leave you to your delusions. Goodbye.

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No, sorry, but these days (since ~92[?]) all oxygen sensors are the SAME, they're just used for different purposes/reasons. The "front" oxygen sensor(s) are used for controlling the A/F mixture during light engine loads, loading, idle or constant speed cruising. The "rear" oxygen sensor(s) are used to determine if the catalyst is still operating efficiently.

The 4 oxygen sensors in my '95 LS400 are exactly the same, the only real difference is that the heating capability is not used in the rear ones. I suppose it might be that someone makes rear ones, cheaper, that do not include the heating element.

Jaswood- the 1st A/F ratio sensors that I am aware of in anything Toyota made was in '97 and by '99 the were in a lot more of T/L models. There are still vehicles today that DO NOT use A/F ratio sensors. They are normally about 3 to 4 times as expensive as Oxygen sensors. And they ARE NOT the same thing, not by a long shot. Your '95 predates even the use of A/F sensors in ANYTHING that I'm aware of.

Some sort of confusion factor going on here.

I have to go look at my '92 LS400 factory shop/repair manuals to be sure but off the top of my head it seems to me that it also used 4 oxygen sensors. The front 2 sensors, upstream of the catalyst, are used for controlling the A/F mixture, stoichiometric mixture, for idle and cruise, low engine loading, and the 2nd set downstream of the catalyst to monitor catalyst efficiency.

I suspect what has happened in the interim is that the front oxygen sensors are now more commonly referred to as A/F sensors. The only change to those front oxygen sensors that I am aware of was the addition of self-heating to shorten the sensor detection response time when a cold engine is first started.

Jaswood- Did you bother to read the entire Denso description??? They clearly explain the difference between the two, O2 sensor as compared to A/f ratio sensor. There is a reason that an A/F ratio sensor is called that, to differentiate between it and an O2 sensor. They are clearly different parts. One WILL NOT work in the place of the other. There is a reason why one costs 4 times what the other does, and it's not called "increased profit"! That's the reason I told you to try switching places on a vehicle that uses both. This is probably not true on your '95, but it is definitely true after they started usinf A/F ratio sensors. They are called "wide band sensors" whereas the O2 sensors are called "narrow band sensors". If you do have ANY intertest in actually learning, there is plenty on the internet that will explain EXACTLY how they work, and the difference between the two. It's obvious you aren't interested in learning, so I officially leave you to your delusions. Goodbye.

My '95 LS400 has, uses FOUR oxygen sensors and to date I have changed out three of those, one rear and both fronts. One of the front sensors had the heater fail but I changed both out. Do you know of any reason why the more expensive wideband sensors cannot be used could not be used as plain old "oxygen" sensors downstream of the catalyst...??

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Since I still have the factory shop/repair manuals for my '92 LS400 I went and had a look there. The '92 also used 4 oxygen sensors, the only difference is that it doesn't show the rear sensors as being self heated like the ones shown for the 95.

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Since I still have the factory shop/repair manuals for my '92 LS400 I went and had a look there. The '92 also used 4 oxygen sensors, the only difference is that it doesn't show the rear sensors as being self heated like the ones shown for the 95.

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