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FredParoutaud

Changing Front Brakes/rotors Today...

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Hi Folks,

Just bought new rotors and pads for the front of our 1996 ES300. A buddy of mine said "make sure you don't let the brake fluid back-up into the master cylinder, ABS doesn't like that"

So -- when I press the pistons (piston?) back in, do I just crack the bleed screw open a bit and let the fluid flow out a bleed tube to a jar? ie: is it kind of like bleeding the brakes?

(Anything else I need to know? sounds like a pretty easy job to me)

Thanks!

Fred

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Hi Folks,

Just bought new rotors and pads for the front of our 1996 ES300. A buddy of mine said "make sure you don't let the brake fluid back-up into the master cylinder, ABS doesn't like that"

So -- when I press the pistons (piston?) back in, do I just crack the bleed screw open a bit and let the fluid flow out a bleed tube to a jar? ie: is it kind of like bleeding the brakes?

(Anything else I need to know? sounds like a pretty easy job to me)

Thanks!

Fred

I'd bleed out a bit more per wheel. Say the equivalent of the flex hose to the caliper. This will get rid of all the cooked fluid and supply fresher fluid to the calipers. When bleeding, make sure you have pressure in the line (on the pistons when bleeding the calipers - or on the the brake pedal when bleeding the line) anytime you have the screw open. Otherwise you'll introduce air into the system.

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I have never had that problem with the ABS...I dont crack the bleed screw ever, only after I do the brake job and bleed the brakes.... Make sure to lube the sliding points of the pads on the caliper. Just dont get any grease on pads themselves. Just a light coating on the slides is all that is necessary...

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Having just done this job myself last week, there is no need to bleed it at all. I did read somewhere on the boards that it's really not neccessary, wish I could site the post but I'm sure a simple search will bring up the debate on it.

While you're under there, probably a good idea to check your brake hoses for cracks as well. Found some on both of mine (bottom of hose at the very top) and had those replaced those as well. The mechanic did bleed my brakes at that time...

Oh! Just make sure you have a bolt that you can thread into those two holes located on the center cap to pop off the rotor!! This was the one thing not mentioned in a few DIY's I found.

Have fun changing it all out!

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Hi Folks,

Just bought new rotors and pads for the front of our 1996 ES300. A buddy of mine said "make sure you don't let the brake fluid back-up into the master cylinder, ABS doesn't like that"

So -- when I press the pistons (piston?) back in, do I just crack the bleed screw open a bit and let the fluid flow out a bleed tube to a jar? ie: is it kind of like bleeding the brakes?

(Anything else I need to know? sounds like a pretty easy job to me)

Thanks!

Fred

I'd bleed out a bit more per wheel. Say the equivalent of the flex hose to the caliper. This will get rid of all the cooked fluid and supply fresher fluid to the calipers. When bleeding, make sure you have pressure in the line (on the pistons when bleeding the calipers - or on the the brake pedal when bleeding the line) anytime you have the screw open. Otherwise you'll introduce air into the system.

One other note. If you decide to go ahead, make sure you keep an eye on the reservoir and not let the level get too low, again, to prevent air from entering the system.

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