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dr721

1996 Es300 Window And Electrical Problems

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I bought my ES300 from a dealer a few months ago as is. When I started driving it around regularly I noticed that after rolling the window down (anywhere past about halfway), when I go to roll it up again, it will only go up about half of the way. A few minutes later it will go up a little more, and so on until it is finally all the way up. It always goes down entirely without any issue, and no matter how long you wait after putting it down, it still takes several attempts to get it back up. My friend suggested that it could be a problem with the limit switch, thoughts?

Also, Fuse #23 (20 amp) in the engine fuse box, blows out every couple of weeks, and I haven't been able to determine why. I looked in the manual to see that it controlled the interior lights, power locks, the dinging sound when the key is in the ignition, etc... and have tried isolating which it might be, but to no avail. The fuse shows no sign of being slowing burned through, so I have to assume something is just blowing it but I can't determine what it is. Has anyone else had a similar problem?

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks.

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I looked up the schmatic, and it shows me (if I am reading it right), that the 20 amp fuse for the dome lights is also for the power windows. How many miles do you have on the car? My quess would be that the power window motor is worn. Do you own a DVM (multimeter) that can measure at least 20 amps? If so you can splice into one of the motor wires and measure the actual current. It would make sense that it would have problems closing, while opening is not a issue (gravity is helping the window open). I would check auto part stores for a rebuilt motor, or going to a wrecking yard for a used on. I am sure that Toyota is very proud of new motors, and Lexus would be even MORE PROUD! Whatever you decide, do not purchase for LEXUS.

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I looked up the schmatic, and it shows me (if I am reading it right), that the 20 amp fuse for the dome lights is also for the power windows. How many miles do you have on the car? My quess would be that the power window motor is worn. Do you own a DVM (multimeter) that can measure at least 20 amps? If so you can splice into one of the motor wires and measure the actual current. It would make sense that it would have problems closing, while opening is not a issue (gravity is helping the window open). I would check auto part stores for a rebuilt motor, or going to a wrecking yard for a used on. I am sure that Toyota is very proud of new motors, and Lexus would be even MORE PROUD! Whatever you decide, do not purchase for LEXUS.

I am closing in on about 137000 miles.

Looking at the manual, it describes the fuse as:

No. 23 - Dome - 20 amp

It claims to control the radio, cassette tape player, compact disc player, power antenna, interior lights, door courtesy light,

ignition switch light, trunk light, electronic moon roof system, instrument panel light, door lock and theft deterrent system,

locking with wireless remote control system.

Although, when the fuse is out the only things that don't work are the interior lights and the door locks.

I do have a multimeter but was hoping to avoid having to splice any wires...

Hope this helps.

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if you could back-probe the wires directly on the motor you could verify the integrity of the circuit. The connector at the motor probably has weather tight connectors, I am guessing that you probably do not have backprobing pins. You can make a good substitute by "Borrowing" a couple sewing needles of pins from your significant other. Solder a wire to each one. The idea is to slide the pin between the wire and seal at the connector.

So the bottom line is, if you measure 12v at the motor (with it plugged in) and the window is still moving slowly, your next step would be to clean the rails that the window rides in. If it is still bad, replace the motor.

The important thing about measuring the voltage is to have the actual load connected. The impedance of the average DVM is so high that you can read voltage at a terminal even if the circuit resistance is far too high to run a low impedance device (like a motor). I would be willing to be that the motor is bad, but this test will tell you for sure.

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