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Broke Tab/tb Guide On Ls400 Oil Pump - Can Oil Pump Still Be Used?

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While changing timing belt (TB) on 1993 LS400, had difficulty keeping crankshaft (CS) pulley from moving while torqueing CS pulley bolt to 181 ft lbs. Ended up rotating CS around 1 rev by accident w TB attached to CS timing pulley only (TB was not yet connected to either camshaft timing pulley). The TB bunched up on left side (driver side) of CS timing pulley (inside pulley w teeth) and broke the left tab/guide on front of oil pump body. :angry:

Looks like this tab/guide (its shaped like half circle) on lower left of oil pump just outside of CS timing pulley/helps keep TB positioned against CS timing pulley at start when attaching TB to CS timing pulley.

With this damaged tab/guide on the oil pump, will the TB stay aligned and properly tensioned and function OK? Do I need to replace the oil pump? Can I do this w/o removing engine?

Also, how do you keep CS pulley from moving while tightening crankshaft pulley bolt? Do you need a specail tool? If so, where can you get this tool?

Appreciate your reply/comments...THANKS! :)

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What happened with this? I just did the same thing.

The piece isn't even shown in factory guide drawings, is it even necessary to replace it?

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Welcome Mat.

Can you post a picture of the broken part?

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A good reason why DIY isn't always a cheap route to go.  There is no reason any of this should have happened, a real tech would not have done it. And for all wana bee's your car is not the place to learn any sort of mechanics.

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9 hours ago, Exhaustgases said:

A good reason why DIY isn't always a cheap route to go.  There is no reason any of this should have happened, a real tech would not have done it. And for all wana bee's your car is not the place to learn any sort of mechanics.

Well I wholeheartedly disagree with this logic, Bob. Mistakes do happen and they make for a great learning experience, even if somewhat painful.

What DIYs should learn to do is to carefully read through the manual and understand what they are getting themselves into before tackling a job. But do not be so fearful that you never pick up a wrench. 

Working on a 23 yr old car is exactly the place to learn.

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