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tranny problems on a 2000 es


jrsalazar
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I have a white pearl 2000 es 300 with 38,000 miles. This is my wife's car and as you notice, she does not drive much. When shifting into reverse or drive, there is a 'jerking' feeling on the shifter. I was told by our Lexus dealer that the throttle speed position sensor needs to be replaced. What exactly is the sensor? Is it covered by the powertrain warranty (4 year warranty expired)? Also, the dealer recommended doing the following, are they necessary with the age of my car and miles driven?

Engine Decarbonization (what is that for?)

Power steering flush

Air conditioner filter

Brake fluid flush.

Thanks for any information you may provide.

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I have a white pearl 2000 es 300 with 38,000 miles. This is my wife's car and as you notice, she does not drive much.  When shifting into reverse or drive, there is a 'jerking' feeling on the shifter. I was told by our Lexus dealer that the throttle speed position sensor needs to be replaced. What exactly is the sensor? Is it covered by the powertrain warranty (4 year warranty expired)? Also, the dealer recommended doing the following, are they necessary with the age of my car and miles driven?

Engine Decarbonization (what is that for?)

Power steering flush

Air conditioner filter

Brake fluid flush.

Thanks for any information you may provide.

Since you live in an area with an abundance of Lexus dealers and Lexus specialty repair shops, I'd take the car to another shop for a second opinion. The throttle position sensor on early-mid 1990's Lexus models was adjustable and durable - could last the life of the car. However, I'm not sure if this is still the case in 2000 models.

Engine decarbonization sounds highly suspicious. If any parts of the throttle body become dirty, they can be manually cleaned in about 10 minutes with a small amount of throttle body cleaner, a toothbrush and some old rags. The dealer probably has something more sophisticated in mind in order to be able to charge you big bucks.

Nothing in the brake, power steering or tranmission needs "flushing". Partial fluid replacements is helpful for long term component durability, if genuine Toyota (factory original) fluids are used. though they are not absolutely mandatory at such a low mileage. Example: the dealer will probably want to hook up some kind of expensive power steering flush machine and then install aftermarket fluid. Your system, however, would be better served by just sucking out the existing fluid that's in the power steering reservoir, measuring the amount removed, then adding the same amount of new genuine Toyota Dexron automatic transmission fluid (available in 1 quart bottled from Toyota dealers for about $3.40 and one quart is all you need).

Same thing with the transmission. Draining and refilling the transmission oil pan with genuine toyota auto trans fluid would be adequate and far less costly and complicated compared to the "total flush" your dealer would do - especially since the dealer might install aftermarket fluid (dealers like to install aftermarket fluid because it is cheaper to buy and thus more profitable for them)

I'd let the dealer do the brake flush (fluid change) only if the dealer will install genuine Toyota brake fluid. You can buy it in one pint bottles from Toyota dealers for $3-4 a bottle. You might need about 5 bottles. A Lexus dealer might charge $15 a pint (and that might be for an aftermarket brand!)

The bottom line is to try to keep your Lexus 100% Toyota by using genuine Toyota parts, filters and fluids and not let anyone, including (ironically) a Lexus dealer try to talk you into aftermarket parts, filters and fluids. In other words, you want to try and maintain the car the way the Toyota/Lexus engineers would like to see it maintained, not the way the profit minded dealer would like to see it maintained.

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You mean it resists being shifted?

There is merit to having the engine, transmission, brake and power steering flushed, but this is something to be considered around 100,000 miles to clean from deposits, at 38,000 miles this would be extreme overkill. They're definately trying to take your money. The TPS Sensor very well could be the problem, and no that wouldn't be covered under the warranty.

I agree, second opinion.

Welcome to the LOC!

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