Jump to content

Ignition: Key Turns But Does Not Engage


lvanhoff
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is different than the "stuck in ACC position" which I also have already had a few years ago, and replaced the entire ignition set. Now, I just had to have it towed because when i turned the key, it just sort of spins past everything, car doesn't start. Radio won't go on. Lights inside the car and headlights will go on. Seat warmers will not go on. Windows will not open. It feels like the key is simply not engaging anything when you turn it.

I had it towed to my driveway in San Francisco. Any troubleshooting ideas??

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any suggestions about what i need to do to fix? Lexus is saying to replace the entire ignition cylinder & key which was REALLY expensive last time. I've had it do the "stuck in ACC position" TWICE already! This is the third time this ignition has failed. Doesn't that seem outrageous for an 01? And they keep making me pay for it which also seems insane.

I'd rather not have them replace the whole ignition cylinder if i don't need to.

Thanks

Laura

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is different than the "stuck in ACC position" which I also have already had a few years ago, and replaced the entire ignition set. Now, I just had to have it towed because when i turned the key, it just sort of spins past everything, car doesn't start. Radio won't go on. Lights inside the car and headlights will go on. Seat warmers will not go on. Windows will not open. It feels like the key is simply not engaging anything when you turn it.

I had it towed to my driveway in San Francisco. Any troubleshooting ideas??

Thanks!

I had the same thing happen to my '97 LX470 in the middle of the night in the middle of nowhere about 2 years ago. The cam shaft that extends from the ignition switch to the electrical contacts broke. It cost me about $600 to get it fixed at the Toyota dealer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If i say the linkage behind the key cyclinder is broekn what do you think you need to do?

the point of my reply which was obviously not clear is that it sounds like there are a few possible outcomes for that issue. My question, ill framed, was whether i have to let Lexus replace the entire ignition cylinder etc. for $1200 like last time, or if the "linkage behing the key cylinder" is a smaller issue.

So far I dont feel very comfortable with lexus so I want to make sure I understand the issue as well as i can before I hand it over for this issue for the third time in 4 years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is different than the "stuck in ACC position" which I also have already had a few years ago, and replaced the entire ignition set. Now, I just had to have it towed because when i turned the key, it just sort of spins past everything, car doesn't start. Radio won't go on. Lights inside the car and headlights will go on. Seat warmers will not go on. Windows will not open. It feels like the key is simply not engaging anything when you turn it.

I had it towed to my driveway in San Francisco. Any troubleshooting ideas??

Thanks!

I had the same thing happen to my '97 LX470 in the middle of the night in the middle of nowhere about 2 years ago. The cam shaft that extends from the ignition switch to the electrical contacts broke. It cost me about $600 to get it fixed at the Toyota dealer.

thanks Nuken Geek..that's helpful, I'll check it out with Toyota.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

The ignition crank shaft is broken inside the Steering Column Lock Assy. VERY CHEAP Design considering it’s a LEXUS… B) what happened to PURSUIT TO PERFECTION!!! :o I think the Engineers dropped the ball on this one…the shaft should be a machined part not CAST ALUMINUM(easily breaks). You will need to buy a new assy. (Bracket Assembly P/N: 45280-60510 cost appr. $302.21 CDN :ph34r: ) at Lexus Dealer and 2 Cap Screw bolts (it has a Allen key head on it – size M8 x 1.00 X 20mm) to replace the breakaway bolt so its easier the next time you have to replace it :D (cost appr. $0.96 ea at Canadian Tire/Hardware store).

:) To replace you'll need to remove the black snap-on panel below speedometer then remove the screws securing the dash panel below the steering wheel. Behind the dash panel is a steel plate. Remove that and remove the steering column covers by turning the steering wheel to access the screws. You'll see that the SCLA is secured by 2 break-away bolt (this is an anti-theft feature—I don’t think a thief would take 15-30 mins to disassemble the lower dash assembly to get access to the ignition switch... :ph34r: even then he can crank the engine but wont start due to the ELECTRONIC anti-theft on the Key cylinder, thats why i replaced mine with the Allen head bolts). Use a straight awl to make a dimple in the 2 bolts and then drill it out starting with a small drill 5/32” then 3/16” then 7/32” about a ¼ “ deep or a bit more till the head of the breakaway bolt snaps off…allowing the SCLA to be removed. The use of a 90 Degree angle Drill works the best since there is not much room and short drill bits. The notch in the screw head to remove with a flathead screwdriver is NOT GONNA WORK…the bolt is in there really tight. :blink:

If you prefer you can remove the whole steering column :rolleyes: (MAKE SURE TO DISABLE THE AIRBAG—see your owners Manual for SRS fuses about 6 of them (under dash and under hood and disconnect the battery and wait 2 mins) to get more access when drilling…by removing the bolt at the bottom on the U-Joint and the 4 Nuts holding the column to the dash…but make sure to put the steering back in the same position…remove it with the wheel facing straight forward…also remove the wiper/light/tilt steering switches to avoid damaging them if you’re going this route. Remove the broken SCLA and remove the ignition switch & key fob electronics; Ignition Cylinder (this comes off with the key in ACC position and pushing down on a pin on the casing and pulling the cylinder out); and install into new SCLA. :D And install back onto column with the new cap screw bolts…so much easier with the Allen head on it. And finish off with the re-installation of all the wiring and panels. If your mechanically incline this should take about 2-3 hrs. and save you $300-400 in labor cost. :censored:

- Part numbers are same at Toyota and Lexus dealers.

Braket assembly/Steering Column Lock Assy: 45280-60510

If you prefer OEM Steering Lock Bolt: 45897-12020 (qty. 2)

Aftermarket Cap Screw Bolt (Allen head on it) M8 X 1.00 X 20mm (qty. 2)

I know this will help because i just finished the job on a 2001 LX470.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

I just completed this job and want to say that this post was pretty darn helpful. Here are some additional tips to make this go smoothly.

You will need 10mm and 12 mm socket for most of the bolts. You will need a deep 14 mm socket to drop the steering column (more on this later).

Slide the power seat all the way to the back to give yourself room before you disconnect the battery.

- Part numbers are same at Toyota and Lexus dealers.

Braket assembly/Steering Column Lock Assy: 45280-60510

If you prefer OEM Steering Lock Bolt: 45897-12020 (qty. 2)

Aftermarket Cap Screw Bolt (Allen head on it) M8 X 1.00 X 20mm (qty. 2)

I picked up the SCLA from the local Toyata dealer who had a 25% off parts coupon. It ended up being cheaper than the lowest internet dealer that I could find. I bought the 2 cap screw bolts from Home Depot.

To replace you'll need to remove the black snap-on panel below speedometer then remove the screws securing the dash panel below the steering wheel. Behind the dash panel is a steel plate.

Be sure to remove the 4 screws holding in the hood release and fuel door release handles - lift the handles and you will see them. That will allow you to completely remove the plastic panel.

Behind the plastic panel is a steel panel that needs to be removed (4 x 12mm) and then you will see the steel plate attached to the bottom the steering column.

Remove that and remove the steering column covers by turning the steering wheel to access the screws. You'll see that the SCLA is secured by 2 break-away bolts.

Remove the black plastic duct that runs underneath the steering column. There is a single screw that holds it in place, remove the screw then wiggle the duct out.

You do not need any special angle drills nor do you have to remove the entire steering column. Simply drop it. This is very easy and will save you a lot of trouble. Take a look at the base of the steering column and turn the steering wheel so that the u-joint at the bottom is positioned such that the column can pivot straight down. Then remove the 4 nuts holding the steering column up (using the deep 14mm socket). The steering column will then pivot on the U-joint with the steering wheel resting on the drivers seat. I was then easily able to use a regular cordless drill and regular length bits on the bolts.

post-110617-1266858644_thumb.jpg

Use a straight awl to make a dimple in the 2 bolts and then drill it out starting with a small drill 5/32” then 3/16” then 7/32” about a ¼ “ deep or a bit more till the head of the breakaway bolt snaps off…allowing the SCLA to be removed.

Before drilling, note that there is another bolt on the top of the SCLA. Note how it is all the way in and flush. The bolt is actually a pin that aligns the various parts of the steering column and lock assembly. You will need to make sure that it goes back in flush.

Also note that you will be creating a lot of little metal shavings. These shavings can interfere or damage other gears that are in the column. Do what you can to keep the shavings out of the other areas.

Make sure your drill bits are nice and sharp, and you will be able to drill out the two bolts pretty quickly. When I felt that I had drilled enough, I inserted a screwdriver into the drilled out bolt and used a hammer to tap on it until the bolt head broke and the SCLA dislodged.

Remove the broken SCLA and remove the ignition switch & key fob electronics; Ignition Cylinder (this comes off with the key in ACC position and pushing down on a pin on the casing and pulling the cylinder out); and install into new SCLA.

post-110617-1266860836_thumb.jpg

When removing the electronics on the REAR of the SCLA, note that it is keyed and can only go back on if the ignition is turned just right. The same goes for the key cylinder. Insert a pair of needle nose pliers into the SCLA to turn the blade to the position that is required. HOWEVER, be aware that if the position is off by 180 degrees, then the SCLA will lock at the wrong time - that is that the steering column will not lock when the ignition is off and WILL lock when the ignition is on. I found this out later.

Attaching the new SCLA was the most frustrating part. The thingy that the SCLA bolts up to has some springs in it that push it away from the steering column, putting it just out of reach of the 20mm bolts. I wonder if slightly longer bolts (25mm?) might have been easier to use. Also keep in mind the alignment of steering column for the bolt on the top of the SCLA as well.

Put the steering column back on, reattach the battery and start her up. Turn the steering wheel to opposite ends to check that it doesn't catch/lock when the ignition is on. Drive around the block a few times to be sure. If the steering wheel does lock when it is not supposed to then you need to turn the blade in SCLA by 180 degrees. It is a tight fit, but you can do this without dropping the steering column. Remove the electronics from the rear of the SCLA and remove the key cylinder. Use your needle nose pliers to reach into the SCLA and turn the blade 180 degrees, then put everything back together. Take it for another test drive to verify that the locking mechanism is working properly.

If all is good, then close up the patient and go get a beer.

It took me about 4 to 5 hours total. That includes a lot of time trying to figure out the best way to reach the bolts, trying to get the new SCLA back on, and figuring out the reversed column lock situation. But knowing what I know now, the job should take about half of that time.

And from now on, make sure you turn the steering wheel to relieve any pressure off the steering wheel lock before turning the ignition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Here is another way of doing it that took me about 45 minutes. Not sure if it would work on every occasion, but maybe worth trying.

"Picked up the parts and went to work. It turned out to be much easier than I first thought. The procedure can be done in 2-3 different ways. The first one is to do what the dealer does (or at least what they say they do) and take out the whole steering column and do all the work on a bench. Or you can loosen the upper 4 bolts holding the column and bring it down a little for better access. The third and easiest way to do it is to just exchange the broken Cam Rod without taking the whole housing off the column.

In an earlier post somebody mention that they had to sacrifice the lower plastic cover below the steering wheel due to the steering wheel being locked via the steering lock (one or two screws are behind the steering wheel). This will not be necessary if you take the ignition sleeve and the first of the two broken Cam Rod pieces out of the housing. This will enable you to stick a screwdriver inside and push on the locking mechanism for the steering lock so that the steering wheel can be turned to access the screws.

However, if you do it the way I just did it, you don't even have to remove the upper two plastic covers.

This procedure (which takes less than an hour to do) is for an LX470 2002:

First remove the plastic cover that sits under the steering column which houses the rear window buttons, the gas fill cover and the hood latch. Remove it completely for easy access. Four Philips screws hold the two latches. Four electrical connections also need to be disconnected. Also remove the metal plate held down by four 10mm bolts. This gives you better access.

Remove the black ring that's around the ignition (one Philips screw) and place it to the side.

Now remove the key cylinder by inserting the key to the ON (or somewhere between ON and Acc) position and push a small screwdriver or a small punch in to the whole underneath the housing to release the key cylinder.

After removing the cylinder make sure you take a look at exactly which position the broken Cam Rod is in so that you get it right when inserting the new one later. I believe you can also look at the new one you just bought as they don't sell just the Cam Rod, but the whole housing.

Now the small broken piece needs to come out and this is where it gets a little trickier. As you will see on the new housing, there is a slot that allows you to insert or remove the Cam Rod which also acts as a lock so the Cam Rod doesn't come out again. Doing the whole procedure this way makes it difficult if not impossible to have a look in the back of the housing since it's still attached to the steering column.

The next step is to remove the two Philips screws holding the white plastic part that is attached to the back of the housing. It's possible to get a medium sized Philips screwdriver in there and remove the screws, but quite difficult to get the screws back in again. (tape the screw to the screwdriver while trying to locate the holes). Then back off the plastic part about 1/4" so that the Cam Rod can be turned easily. Using a pair of very long needle pliers the broken part can now be turned and pulled out. This is where you will look at the new Cam Rod and the new housing to see how to position the broken off piece inside the housing so that it can be extracted. Mine had to be turned about 90 degrees to the left.

After this you take the new Cam Rod and push it in all the way so that the slot in the housing is aligned with the part of the Cam Rod that needs to fit in this slot. I used a pair of needle pliers to push the rod in. Then turn the Cam Rod so it's in the same position as the old one was in when you first took it apart. This should prevent you from placing the rod in the 180 degree wrong position. If you turn it 180 degrees the wrong way I believe you will have to use procedure 1 or 2 (removing the housing by drilling out the bolts) since the Cam Rod is now in the way for you to get in with a long screwdriver and release the steering lock. Fortunately it worked the first time for me."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...

Forums


News


Membership