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VBdenny

Cold Weather Start-ups

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Whenever I start my 400, I usually let it idle until the RPM's drop to 600. Last night while enjoying some refreshing adut beverages with my neighbor he made an interesting comment. Last wek he bought a new Toyota SUV, and when he read the owners manual it said to drive right away and let the car warm up under way. Since a Lexus is a Toyota, does this apply?

What do you all think?

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Warm it up especially in the winter---or go slow for a couple of miles.

I really wouldn't believe that unless I saw in writing then I would not agree with it.

Is against all logic. :D

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In the old days when carburetors were the norm, the engine was best started and driven gently to get the choke to turn off as quickly as possible. If idled, the choke would stay on too long, causing an over-rich mixture, which could foul the spark plugs and dilute the engine oil. With modern fuel injection those problems no longer occur. On the other hand the engine will warm up more quickly when driven gently straight away. A very cold start might cause me to idle the engine for one or two minutes, any other time I just check all the gauges, get my seatbelt on, and drive the car. Maybe half a minute, that's all. With 5W-30 oil, lubrication in all parts of the engine is nearly instant, even in cold weather, so no problems there either.

So the Toyota manual is right, just drive the car after a short pause to check everything.

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I have always heard to start driving right away. This gives the transmission, differential, and wheel bearings all a chance to warm up at the same time.

Now, that being said, it should be slowly for the first 1/2 to mile or so. My 99 won't shift into 3rd gear easily if it is cold - much worse than any car I've ever owned. This is the only thing I don't like about my LS <_<

Therefore , I only go about 15 mph (through the neighborhood) cause I don't want the engine to run over 1800 rpms before it warms enough to shift into 3rd gear. If it is cold and I run the engine up to about 2500 rpms - it will shift; but I don't like to run it like that.

Once it gets over this initial shifting taboo, it's good for the day. BTW, my LS is ALWAYS GARAGED..

If I had to get right out and accelerate quickly I would let it warm up more.

I still think this "Hard" shifting is not right <_<

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I purchased a 1969 MG new and the owners manual said that as soon as the oil pressure gage was registering normal, to put the car in gear and drive away slowly. It said that doing this would get the engine and drivetrain up to temperature quicker which would reduce wear and tear on the engine. I have lived in the sunbelt for most of my life and never drive in the brutally cold parts of the country. I have used this procedure on every car that I have owned since 1969 and have unusually good reliability with my car engines. Just my humble opinion.

Curt

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Whenever I start my 400, I usually let it idle until the RPM's drop to 600.  Last night while enjoying some refreshing adut beverages with my neighbor he made an interesting comment.  Last wek he bought a new Toyota SUV, and when he read the owners manual it said to drive right away and let the car warm up under way. Since a Lexus is a Toyota, does this apply?

What do you all think?

Sometimes I drive off right away, but I drive about 2 miles at speeds below 30 mph before I get to the highway. I could not let it set and idle down, as I can even drive my car for 10 minutes before the idle will go down all the way down. It will idle at about 900 rpms, rather than 600 rpms. I have noticed this at stoplights after I have just started the car and whether it has been driven for 10 miles or 10 minutes.

99LSGUY- That shifting into 3rd gear does not sound normal. MY 90 LS400, with 226K does not shift like this when cold and I have not heard of others doing that either. They do seem to shift a little more firm when cold however. I have no idea what would cause a overly harsh 2-3 shift. Perhaps just the nature of the 98-00 LS400s? Perhaps it is normal.

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I appreciate the responses. I just found a very good reason for letting the car warm up before driving. It is COLD outside here, perhaps close to the coldest I've ever seen it. I never have seen the need for things like heated seats here in Virginia Beach, but when it is about 17F outside, I see whay they are important.

I also garage my car all the time. Letting a car sit outside is really rough on everything. I know many people don't have the option of a garage, but they definitely make a difference. Although everyone near me has garages, I only know one other person who puts their car inside. Most people have they filled with junk.

I'm going to still go with the warm up the car. first plan. Sometimes if I'm late or something I will go after a minute or two, but I am not a key to shift lever person.

Regarding the hard third gear shift, I don't think it all that unusual. While you certainly don't want to high rev a cold engine, you don't want to lug it either as that can damage parts just as easily.

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ON the cold upshifts:---the transmission shifts are changed by engine temp and trans. oil temp.; ie: 3rd upshift will NOT occur if coolant temp is under 95 degrees and speed is less than 25MPH['93:AT49].

If you are just poking(southern for slow) when the engine is cold, you will feel this 'hang up'!!!!! Means that the car needs a little warmup before going fast !!!!

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I agree with tansupplyman ....... not so unusual when quite cold. Mine does this as well. I think it is so noticable because the dang thing is sooooooooo darn smooth when it warms up ....... we forget it is a machine which perfoms best when warmed up. Mine never takes more than a minute or a few blocks of gentle driving to start to smooth back out. :D

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Tan

ON the cold upshifts:---the transmission shifts are changed by engine temp and trans. oil temp.; ie: 3rd upshift will NOT occur if coolant temp is under 95 degrees and speed is less than 25MPH['93:AT49]

Why is this? it shifts immediately from 1st to 2nd but does HANG just like you say - Is it just the LS's way to help Warmup Quicker. Your numbers are accurate - it does shift if I get to 25+pmh ( or around 2600 rpm).

98LS - I do notice it because the LS is "silky smooth" otherwise.

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The only time I let it get warm is when I take my three months old daughter to the babysitter....otherwise, I just put it in gear and go. I have no problem with any of my cars by doing this. But I do take care of them, like preventive maint. etc..

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I was reading about that in one of my magazines. I've always waited a 20 seconds, before putting my car in reverse. I usually don't Rev above 2000-2500RPMs until the oil is warm, but then again I also warm up my tires, until the cops pull me over. :angry:

Master mechanic, Pat Goss from MotorWeek says, you should idle for a minute, then drive the car, slowly.

I'm too impatient. :D

Yes, it's &#33;Removed&#33; cold here too, burrrrrrrrrrr

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If you let the car idle to warm up you're doing three things.

1. Wasting gas. When the engine is cold it uses gas at almost twice the rate of when its warm.

2. Causing wear. 90% of all engine wear takes place when idling with the engine cold.

3. Extending the time the engine runs when cold, making problem 1 and 2 even worse.

On a modern engine its just best to start the car, sit for 15-20 seconds and let the oil get to all points of lubrication and drive. Lexus transmissions are designed to hold upshifts longer to make the engine warm up quicker. It probably takes 2-3 times longer for the engine to warm up when its idling, all that time you're wasting gas, causing wear and just plain wasting time ;)

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Hey Guys/Gals,

How did I manage to get a "Warn: (0%) " under my ID? Just noticed that, I haven't PO anyone here, have I? Please advise.

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Check out the feedback forum ;)

Everyone has that under their name. As long as it only says 0% then you haven't done anything wrong.

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Master mechanic, Pat Goss from MotorWeek says, you should idle for a minute, then drive slowly.

I agree with Goss on this one, but I can't believe he is a "master mechanic". Some of his little "demos" are full of mistakes.

Sam Memollo, now he is a mechanic, who obviously worked in the trade.

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Actually,

You should turn off your car (if its practical) when you will probably be at idle for more than 30 seconds.....even if the car is warm.

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I think everyone has a warn (0%), but only you can see it. Check in the website forum, Matthew put a post in there regarding this.

As far a warming the car, I guess I'll let it warm up less but I hate driving in a cold car. I froze as a teenager driving in the winter with inadequate heaters.

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My 98 shifts very hard into 2nd (I believe.) It revs up to about 25 mph then kicks when it shifts. After the first shift through all the gears it shifts smoother than any car I ever had. Other maybe my pontiac. Pontiacs are built with rock solid trannys. I wonder now seeing how others have the same problem.

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Master mechanic, Pat Goss from MotorWeek says, you should idle for a minute, then drive slowly.

I agree with Goss on this one, but I can't believe he is a "master mechanic". Some of his little "demos" are full of mistakes.

Sam Memollo, now he is a mechanic, who obviously worked in the trade.

I've met Pat Goss. The dealership I bought my Explorer at and have it serviced at is the new home of Goss' Garage, he runs the entire service department now. He definately knows his stuff, he's just sometimes a little "off the beaten path" with some things.

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Same here. I did some Tests for Motorweek, and Pat really does know his stuff, although my race Mechanic got into a frenzy with him over something. Yes, he an ASE Certified Master Mechanic.

I like Sam and the other guys from Two Guys Garage. They know their stuff as well.

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I stand corrected. I will watch him with that in mind.

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