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First Time Using A Buffer [if I Order One]


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OK...where to start...

I'm planning--for the first time ever--to detail my '98 LS 400 with a machine polisher/buffer (yet to be ordered). Typically, I order detail supplies from Classic Motoring Accessories www.properautocare.com, and am trying to decide between the Porter Cable 7424 and Meguiars’ G-110. I know many of you are familiar with and like the PC model. I'm not considering circular polishers because my car doesn't have any significant scratches or paint defects, and because I am in no way a professional. This will be my first time ever handling ANY kind of polisher, and to be honest I don't even know what it feels like. So orbital is the way to go for me, I believe.

For years, I've detailed my cars by hand, and most people agree they generally look stunning (I attached pics of my 1990 535i I owned a few years ago, taken just after I'd washed the car, clayed it with Mothers California Gold, polished with Klasse All-in-One and coated it with Klasse Sealant Glaze and Wal Mart-purchased Zymöl cleaner wax). Looks pretty good. For my LS 400, I now have or will buy the following products, applied by hand last year [sorry, no pics]:

Menzerna Auto Shampoo

Mothers California Gold clay bar

Klasse AIO [acrylic polish]

Menzerna FMJ [acrylic polish]

Klasse High Gloss Sealant Glaze [acrylic sealant]

P21S paste wax [carnauba wax, of which I applied about 5 coats last year over one-week intervals]

It seems like everyone agrees a car will look "many times better" if machine polished/buffed, as opposed to the hand method. Naturally, I want a part of this, but am SUPER, SUPER nervous about !Removed! up my car's perfectly decent finish just because I was greedy and wanted "more," beyond what I've been doing for years. Once I choose and receive my buffer, it will be in the hands of a complete novice!

So...I need advice

-Those of you who are experienced using these devices, what are some tips [to avoid common mistakes] you would give a beginner? How do I NOT SCRATCH or otherwise burn my paint? What causes this damage anyway? Too much pressure? Contaminants on the pad? All my acquaintances seem to know of someone who messed up their car's finish trying to use a polisher (one even said it was an orbital polisher). Are these people boneheads, or am I right to be fearful now?

-Naturally, what recommendations do you have as far as the type of machine? I can happily spend $150 or more [the PC 7424 is on sale at CMA for $149.95, and they have it with pads http://www.properautocare.com/74uldemawico.html for $199.95].

-Why does the PC 7424 have its grip on the side like that? The Meguiars model I mentioned has a handle on the front, which seems like it'd be easier to use.

-Which of the products I listed would benefit from polisher application? It seems like some on this forum got into trouble when they attempted to buff off waxes with their polisher/buffer.

Let me know what you think--I plan to place the order soon!

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I have a PC and like it, I don't use it much anymore because I've got my process down to where I only need to machine polish my car maybe once a year.

If I were buying one today though, I probably would buy a Flex over the PC or the Meguiars unit. I've not used the Flex, but most people who have used it and the PC feel that its an upgrade in power and polishing stregnth.

My advice would be to relax, theres no way you can hurt the paint with an orbital, just do some reading here and on Autopia.org and take your time learning the ropes!

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hello I did not use a rotary for over like 20 years... So when i discovered my black lexus has no clearcoat and can be scratched from car washes it was too late... ton surface scratches... I bought the Flex based upon recommendations I found on the web and some experienced detailers on this and other boards.

Worth every penny. random orbit is the way to go-Iloved using the FLEX! used it 2X on 2 cars-no issues easy to use... u can find a ton of posts in this forum on how and what to do the car... Clay it to remove contaminants--polish protect (again research what you want to use everyone has their products from ultima, Sonus, etc to use)

th eonly way to hurt the car would maybe be if u tried to polish plastic parts? or really spazzed out and fell and smashed your car with the handle....I taped up all the seams and platic parts i could hit while polishing,

I have 3 cars to do when it gets little warmer and i can block out some weekend days..

G luck and post pix when u r done!

I have a PC and like it, I don't use it much anymore because I've got my process down to where I only need to machine polish my car maybe once a year.

If I were buying one today though, I probably would buy a Flex over the PC or the Meguiars unit. I've not used the Flex, but most people who have used it and the PC feel that its an upgrade in power and polishing stregnth.

My advice would be to relax, theres no way you can hurt the paint with an orbital, just do some reading here and on Autopia.org and take your time learning the ropes!

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Wow, $279.95--a bit rich for me. $200 including all the pads and stuff was OK, but now we're talking almost $300 for just the buffer. And I just spent $100 on new wheel caps with chrome emblems (replacing my faded gold ones that haven't matched the new chrome badging I swapped in last summer). Plus I'm trying to get a bicycle before we are halfway through the summer--but then I also want to detail my car before we are halfway through the summer! Otherwise I'd wait a few months and get the more expensive buffer. Oh, and I almost forgot, I'll be spending nearly $1,000 on new tires and the labor for replacement of my tires, brakes, fuel filter and cleaning of my car's throttle body--all within the next two weeks.

It seems like the Flex has the circular motion the PC doesn't have, but according to PAC you still can't scratch up your paint due to the similar orbital action. Seems good. Thanks a lot for the recommendation. Do you all think I'll really be kicking myself if I settle for the PC 7424 ($200 including all pads)? Is this the type of thing where I should say "Forget the bicycle for now--I'd be better to spend the extra $150 or so on the Flex polisher (and corresponding pads), so I can detail my car by May and do it right?" Or do you think I'll probably be happy with the results of the Porter Cable since I'm not a die-hard professional detailer, and of course I'm currently only accustomed to the [more limited] shine/gloss of a hand-detailed car?

SW03ES, I will check out Autopia.org.

Thanks very much!

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Wow, $279.95--a bit rich for me. $200 including all the pads and stuff was OK, but now we're talking almost $300 for just the buffer. And I just spent $100 on new wheel caps with chrome emblems (replacing my faded gold ones that haven't matched the new chrome badging I swapped in last summer). Plus I'm trying to get a bicycle before we are halfway through the summer--but then I also want to detail my car before we are halfway through the summer! Otherwise I'd wait a few months and get the more expensive buffer. Oh, and I almost forgot, I'll be spending nearly $1,000 on new tires and the labor for replacement of my tires, brakes, fuel filter and cleaning of my car's throttle body--all within the next two weeks.

It seems like the Flex has the circular motion the PC doesn't have, but according to PAC you still can't scratch up your paint due to the similar orbital action. Seems good. Thanks a lot for the recommendation. Do you all think I'll really be kicking myself if I settle for the PC 7424 ($200 including all pads)? Is this the type of thing where I should say "Forget the bicycle for now--I'd be better to spend the extra $150 or so on the Flex polisher (and corresponding pads), so I can detail my car by May and do it right?" Or do you think I'll probably be happy with the results of the Porter Cable since I'm not a die-hard professional detailer, and of course I'm currently only accustomed to the [more limited] shine/gloss of a hand-detailed car?

SW03ES, I will check out Autopia.org.

Thanks very much!

Wow, $279.95--a bit rich for me. $200 including all the pads and stuff was OK, but now we're talking almost $300 for just the buffer.

That's exactly what I thought when I bought my orbital. I got the Griots buffer kit. I think I got 3 pads, a huge clay bar, speed detailer, wax and polish for like $190.00 bucks. Which still sounds kinda high, but whatever. I could see getting a Flex or one of those if I were detailing cars for a living, or even 1 or 2 a week. But like SW03ES, if you just do it right the first time, your only really using the buffer 1 or 2 times a year.

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For instance I would not buy a Flex to replace my PC, I've learned to use the PC well and my guess is to me a Flex would probably be better, but not worth the added cost.

However, the Flex has more power which means it will take less time to work out paint issues, thats the real benefit. The PC will work and work well, it will just take more time to work through paint imperfections.

What color is your LS?

If I were still detailing for a living today I wouldn't use a PC or a Flex, I'd use a rotary. Too many cars out there with really hard paint.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I see.

Seems like every internet detailing site I check out where there are photos, the guy is using a PC 7424. Just an observation.

I doubt I would use any polisher even twice a year. Normally I do an exhaustive exterior detail in the Spring (taking a day or two), and then just wash the car regularly, like once a week, or occasionally once every couple of weeks if there's little or no rain. Last year I applied a fresh coat of P21S paste wax each time I washed the car after the detail for the first three times, and then every other time for the next few. The car had like six coats of P21S over Menzerna FMJ over Klasse Sealant Glaze. Most of that has evaporated off by now I'm sure.

The car is Diamond White [tri-coat] pearl. You know the color...

Normally the paint looks flawless, but under harsh lighting (fluorescent, etc.) you can see those really fine scratches in the finish all around the car--I guess those are swirl marks?

My new brake and tire installation + fuel filter, alignment and throttle body cleaning are to be done Monday. Will see how much $$$ is left over after for a buffer.

Is is beneficial to buff off wax with a PC, or that best left done by hand?

I know this is like opening a Pandora's box, but can you think of a carnauba wax that may be appreciably better than P21S? I checked out Pinnacle (a bit more expensive), but a lot of people online said they wouldn't use it on their everyday car (which my LS 400 definitely is, being driven over 32K annually), in part because it evaporates too quickly. I'm definitely satisfied with P21S, but perhaps you had experience with even better products for the price ($35-60). Anything especially good for my color?

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I LOVE my cyclo dual head polisher.

It's an amazing piece of machinery!

A little too heavy for most people.. but after a few polishes you'll be the hulk and it won't matter anymore :lol: hahaha

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To LS 0181158 .... hi .. well ... I have been detailing cars off and on for about 30 years all by hand until about a year ago when i finally stepped up to a Porter Cable 7424. Best money I ever spent. It is like leaping ahead in technology by about 5 light years !!

did you already order yours? Ummmmm .... well .... maybe? Ummmmm ..... just so happens there is a slightly upgraded model you can get that has a slightly heavier and much longer power cable to it ..... it is worth the extra $25. I got mine from AUTOGEEK.COM

AUTOGEEK.com has some short videos that will show you how to use your new machine ... really great!

You are not going to damage paint with your PC 7424 ....

May I suggest checking out ZAINO.COM .... they have a product called "All In One" which is simply a one-step polish if you are just doing a daily driver. That stuff rocks.

What if you were trying to deal with major oxidation or water spots .... or .... some over-spray? In the past I would use 3M polishing compound which is still a great product .... but .... Zaino has something called PC Fusion .... this stuff is a MIRACLE IN A BOTTLE !!! You will NOT scratch the paint with this product. It is the ultimate solution to difficult problems ..... even if you are trying to work on hazed headlights. Yup ... works like a miracle on these modern headlights that are forever hazing on us .... see for yourself. You gotta try this stuff, my friend.

Now ... assuming you want to try Zaino .... I would suggest going to LAZAINO.COM (based in Los Angeles) and ask to speak to Ira .... he makes the correct towels you will need. The towels matter and are not an attempt on Zaino's part to hijack more cash from you. The towels make a BIG difference and they work GREAT. They are fairly inexpensive as well ...... Ira will explain ...

anyways .... what ever random orbit you choose .... I bet it will only take about 10 seconds to wonder why the heck you did not get one years ago .... they are awesome!

The products you have mentioned are all good .... I only share the Zaino idea just in the event you have not heard about it yet .... it is worth a look ... I have used many many products and these days car waxes and similar products are sooooooooooo great compared to what we had only 10 years ago ..... in my opinion, Zaino is the best for ease of use, effectiveness, and longest lasting ..... however ... as I have said ... the products you have chosen will also delight you.

let us know how it goes for you ..... would love to hear some feed back ....

Rick

UPDATE: in my opinion others have indeed damaged paint because of conventional rotary polishers that develop a very high RPM speed, thus causing very high surface temps. being created when trying to polish paint. However, with a random orbit device, the technology is totally different and far more safe. You simply cannot develop an ultra-high surface temp when using a random orbit device. Furthermore ... if you follow my suggestion of using Zaino PC Fusion, you will find that PC Fusion has virtually no abrasive qualities at all ... thus it is very safe, especially when used with a machine. I never bare down on my Porter Cable ... I just use light pressure ... it is all that is required. In fact the lighter your touch with the Porter Cable, the faster the pad will spin .... but if you start pushing on it with greater pressure, the device will slow down on you ... consequently it is also saving your butt by not burning anything. When you see those short videos over at AutoGeek ... you will see ....

I have used medium-cut 3M polishing compound with my Porter Cable. I did not burn off any paint ... but I must say ... I was using a very light and careful touch with it ... I kept a close eye on the surface temp and the paint surface never once got hot on me .... so I knew I was still safe ... plus the fact that the paint i was working on was in excellent condition ... all I was doing was trying to remove some over-spray --- it worked ... but it was taking forever, even though I was using a PC 7424. Sooooooooooo .... I made a call to Ira over at LAZaino and it was then that he just rolled his eyes and said " .... Rick ... please; try PC Fusion ..." He was right.

pretty long winded answer here .... I hope you enjoyed my book! haha!!

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The reason you see everyone using a PC is that the Flex is new to the market.

I haven't read a statement from anyone who has used both that says they prefer the PC.

As for wax, the P21S is a pretty good wax. What are your goals? Do you want better protection or a better look? White is tough. I might even try a true sealant like Zaino and see how I like that.

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perhaps I should also say .... Zaino has quite a few products, the most simple of which would be "All In One" which is simply a one-step ... great if you are in a hurry.

If a car has not been waxed in a while, I use "PC FUSION" first so as to clean the surface very well, then I follow up with "Z-2" and then spray the car with "Z-6" .... all of the Zaino products go on FAST .... and come off FAST .... assuming you are using the towels they recommend, which truly make a huge difference. Ira, over at LA Zaino (Los Angeles) makes these towels for a reasonable price .... I am so glad he talked me into using them ...

ZAINO is very much worth a try ..... great stuff ! !

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  • 2 weeks later...

Great question, I have the same after bring home my 2003 Crystal White LS430 on Saturday. I clayed the hood and polished it by hand and a ton of swirls remain. I was looking at both of the buffers this morning and if that decision isn't hard enough, the many options of various pads with the buffers made my head spin. Keep us posted on what you buy.

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rickatups, thanks a lot for your commentary!

I watched the 10-minute YouTube video of the guy using the PC 7424 on the black GMC Yukon (I don't know if that's the one you were referring to). Gave me a much better idea, for example, of how to spread the polish, and how long to work a section. So, ultimately, you still have to use the microfiber towel by hand to remove the polish residue, correct? I had thought before the polisher would buff away all the polish, but now that I think about it, that doesn't make sense--the polishing pad is always going to be caked with polish. That whole process doesn't actually seem like it would save ANY time over hand-polishing...but I can see how the results probably WOULD look 7-10 times better. That's worth it for me. The video also helped me to notice details I might have overlooked otherwise, such as taping off badging and trim. I was disappointed they didn't show how to apply and remove a paste wax with it, though. Pinnacle products were used--what are your thoughts on that?

It seems you like Zaino products a lot! I have heard good things about them--checked out the website, too. The only thing is, I still have Klasse polish and sealant, Menzerna acrylic sealant, and a bit of P21S paste wax left over, so I'm prone to use those up too before ordering more stuff (only exception is the P21S which is almost gone, so I'm open to trying another carnauba wax of the same or even better quality).

I had a paintless dent-removal guy come by my house a couple weeks ago, and he removed a total of four dents from my car--one very noticeable dent had appeared in the lip of the trunklid two days prior (which prompted my call), and he also removed a barely-noticeable ding in the rear quarter panel which I first observed last summer, plus two other tiny creases/dings which never bothered me but were just as well to be gone. $135 for everything, and I was VERY impressed with the work. Took maybe an hour, and it was awesome to see him gently massage the dents out with a metal rod from behind each panel. I asked him about using a orbital polisher, and he seconded a lot of what you all have said, adding that one has to be very careful along creases and the edges of panels, since that is where the paint and clearcoat is thinnest. The only thing I HAVEN'T received a satisfactory answer about is how one gets into the nooks and crannies that aren't just flat surfaces--for example, the longitudinal lip/ridge that runs from the top of the trunk beneath the side glass and meets the top of the hood, or the painted panel between the taillights where the license plate goes (circular pad obviously cannot get into rectangular corners). I guess there are certain spots you still just have to do by hand? The guy mentioned that smaller attachments are available to access those areas, but I'm not trying to spend a fortune here!

SW03ES, you're right--I don't think white is likely to look as fantastic as a perfectly waxed black or burgundy car--the color doesn't lend the "mirror effect" of a darker hue, and it doesn't highlight the curvature of body panels as well either. I suppose it also doesn't show dirt or blemishes as easily either [i love the morons who tell me, "A white car--wow, that's the hardest color to keep clean!"]

I'm well aware that one's satisfaction with any wax has more to do with the preparation that took place BEFORE the wax went on than the wax itself. Therefore, it's hard to say just how impressed I was with P21S, since all claying and polishing last year were done by hand. I would say I was still impressed. Let me add that I'm a strong believer [thus far] in layering a carnauba wax OVER synthetic/acrylic sealants, the idea being that acrylic sealants tend to lend a strong reflective quality to the finish, while carnauba is known for adding DEPTH. So the end result should be like looking through a crystal-clear pool that has a mirror for a floor. Of course, that effect is again harder to achieve with white than I think any other color--although the pearlescent nature of our Diamond White Lexus paint helps. But yes, I'd say [based on my experience last year] that P21S granted a very rich liquidity to the finish after even the first application (layered over Menzerna FMJ acrylic sealant over Klasse High-Gloss Sealant Glaze). And I layered 4-5 more coats of P21S after that, about a week apart (subsequent to washings, of course).

And yes, I am going for appearance more than anything else. I'm not someone who's outside in January in 30-degree weather applying another coat of wax to my car, so it is desirable the product last until spring--of course, I think the number of coats I layer during summer and fall must surely help with this. I just want my car to look as pristine and lustrous as possible. People who don't know Lexus body styles have thought my car was a 2006-model. Let's say this year, I want them to think it's a 2009.

TexWez, congratulations on your--recent purchase? An LS 430 is definitely one of my candidates to buy after I tire of my LS 400 in a few years! Will let everyone know what I end up doing with the polisher.

Thanks all for your responses and support!

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I had thought before the polisher would buff away all the polish, but now that I think about it, that doesn't make sense--the polishing pad is always going to be caked with polish. That whole process doesn't actually seem like it would save ANY time over hand-polishing...but I can see how the results probably WOULD look 7-10 times better.

Its faster in that it would have taken you 7-10 times as long to achieve the same results by hand...if it was even possible...

I was disappointed they didn't show how to apply and remove a paste wax with it, though. Pinnacle products were used--what are your thoughts on that?

You can't really apply and remove a paste wax with it. The PC is a tool used to work polishes in, IMHO it doesn't add any speed to applying waxes and I've never seen the purpose of trying to remove anything with it. Paste waxes are best applied and removed by hand.

And I layered 4-5 more coats of P21S after that, about a week apart (subsequent to washings, of course).

Something to save you some time. Sealants are layerable to a point. You can probably put 3-4 coats of something like Klasse or Zaino on the paint before you aren't really adding layers anymore. Carnuaba waxes are not layerable. When you apply a wax over a wax layer thats already there, the wax is simply dissolving the wax that is there and replacing it.

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Did not know that! Wow, that's interesting. So ultimately, I've learned:

-think of a machine polisher as just that--a device with which to, in a reasonable amount of time, polish my car's finish to a high degree not likely attainable by hand (and definitely not in a reasonable amount of time).

-continue to apply the subsequent sealants and waxes by hand (which works out well because during the summer I prefer to do this at night in the car wash bay, since it is both cooler at night and I can also see what I'm doing better under the fluorescent lighting--and there's no power outlet there where I would be able to plug in a buffer!).

-apply 3-4 coats of sealant BEFORE moving on to the carnauba wax--and then apply THIS only once (unless, I suppose, I decide to wait three or four months before applying a second coat of carnauba, since by that point a lot of the first coat will have evaporated).

Thanks again for the information!

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rickatups, thanks a lot for your commentary!

I watched the 10-minute YouTube video of the guy using the PC 7424 on the black GMC Yukon (I don't know if that's the one you were referring to). Gave me a much better idea, for example, of how to spread the polish, and how long to work a section. So, ultimately, you still have to use the microfiber towel by hand to remove the polish residue, correct? I had thought before the polisher would buff away all the polish, but now that I think about it, that doesn't make sense--the polishing pad is always going to be caked with polish. That whole process doesn't actually seem like it would save ANY time over hand-polishing...but I can see how the results probably WOULD look 7-10 times better. That's worth it for me. The video also helped me to notice details I might have overlooked otherwise, such as taping off badging and trim. I was disappointed they didn't show how to apply and remove a paste wax with it, though. Pinnacle products were used--what are your thoughts on that?

It seems you like Zaino products a lot! I have heard good things about them--checked out the website, too. The only thing is, I still have Klasse polish and sealant, Menzerna acrylic sealant, and a bit of P21S paste wax left over, so I'm prone to use those up too before ordering more stuff (only exception is the P21S which is almost gone, so I'm open to trying another carnauba wax of the same or even better quality).

I had a paintless dent-removal guy come by my house a couple weeks ago, and he removed a total of four dents from my car--one very noticeable dent had appeared in the lip of the trunklid two days prior (which prompted my call), and he also removed a barely-noticeable ding in the rear quarter panel which I first observed last summer, plus two other tiny creases/dings which never bothered me but were just as well to be gone. $135 for everything, and I was VERY impressed with the work. Took maybe an hour, and it was awesome to see him gently massage the dents out with a metal rod from behind each panel. I asked him about using a orbital polisher, and he seconded a lot of what you all have said, adding that one has to be very careful along creases and the edges of panels, since that is where the paint and clearcoat is thinnest. The only thing I HAVEN'T received a satisfactory answer about is how one gets into the nooks and crannies that aren't just flat surfaces--for example, the longitudinal lip/ridge that runs from the top of the trunk beneath the side glass and meets the top of the hood, or the painted panel between the taillights where the license plate goes (circular pad obviously cannot get into rectangular corners). I guess there are certain spots you still just have to do by hand? The guy mentioned that smaller attachments are available to access those areas, but I'm not trying to spend a fortune here!

SW03ES, you're right--I don't think white is likely to look as fantastic as a perfectly waxed black or burgundy car--the color doesn't lend the "mirror effect" of a darker hue, and it doesn't highlight the curvature of body panels as well either. I suppose it also doesn't show dirt or blemishes as easily either [i love the morons who tell me, "A white car--wow, that's the hardest color to keep clean!"]

I'm well aware that one's satisfaction with any wax has more to do with the preparation that took place BEFORE the wax went on than the wax itself. Therefore, it's hard to say just how impressed I was with P21S, since all claying and polishing last year were done by hand. I would say I was still impressed. Let me add that I'm a strong believer [thus far] in layering a carnauba wax OVER synthetic/acrylic sealants, the idea being that acrylic sealants tend to lend a strong reflective quality to the finish, while carnauba is known for adding DEPTH. So the end result should be like looking through a crystal-clear pool that has a mirror for a floor. Of course, that effect is again harder to achieve with white than I think any other color--although the pearlescent nature of our Diamond White Lexus paint helps. But yes, I'd say [based on my experience last year] that P21S granted a very rich liquidity to the finish after even the first application (layered over Menzerna FMJ acrylic sealant over Klasse High-Gloss Sealant Glaze). And I layered 4-5 more coats of P21S after that, about a week apart (subsequent to washings, of course).

And yes, I am going for appearance more than anything else. I'm not someone who's outside in January in 30-degree weather applying another coat of wax to my car, so it is desirable the product last until spring--of course, I think the number of coats I layer during summer and fall must surely help with this. I just want my car to look as pristine and lustrous as possible. People who don't know Lexus body styles have thought my car was a 2006-model. Let's say this year, I want them to think it's a 2009.

TexWez, congratulations on your--recent purchase? An LS 430 is definitely one of my candidates to buy after I tire of my LS 400 in a few years! Will let everyone know what I end up doing with the polisher.

Thanks all for your responses and support!

Hi ... glad you were able to see that video on YouTube ... I remember that one also .... that was quite good, I thought. Well ... how do you address the smaller areas that the polishing machine cannot reach? Well, I still do some smaller areas by hand .... AUTOGEEK had an interesting hand tool that is made of a dense foam material ..... or if you buy any Zaino, they will usually send you their applicator pad for free which is quite handy for many smaller, detailed tasks ... I like it, because it is quite soft ...

I think the products you are currently using are very good as well ..... I like to experiment with all the brands as I am able ... but as you can tell, at this time I am kinda hooked on Zaino .....

By the way .... AUTOGEEK still has the "Porter Cable 7424 HD" .... the "HD" has the longer, thicker cord .... I really like mine ... I am glad I upgraded into that model.

Let us know how it all goes for you .... !

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  • 4 months later...

Thanks again to all for your assistance and advice. I ended up purchasing the PC 7424 from classicmotoringaccessories.com on sale, with buffing pads/pad lubricant/pad cleaner included.

The new toy was actually put to use back in May, but there was no point in posting pictures at that time as a great deal of work remained to be done before the car was fully presentable. B) Now that it's been finished, you can check out the results in the Show & Shine forum (I figured adding on to this topic with a bunch of pictures might be inappropriate). Please let me know what you think!

I find the depth of reflection and emotional vibrance a bit disappointing, even after a couple of carnauba wax applications, but realize perhaps I am dealing with an apples-to-oranges comparison; most of the cars used to demonstrate waxes and polishes are black or dark in color, and a white car simply will not allow as high a degree of visual drama. Correct me if I'm wrong in my assumption (and then tell me how to achieve better results if possible!). I'm generally very attracted to white cars, especially with a pearlescent effect in of my LS, but the paint just seems to be more difficult to bring to life than a dark color.

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  • 7 months later...

I have used the Porter Cable unit for a number of years on 2002 LS430 and 2007 460L, both black. Great tool, even bought one for my son-in=law for his LX450 Black and his Lund, also black. The machine will do all you could ask of it and with a few different backing plates and a housing for dust removal it makes a terrific sander. This sanding duty will help justify it to the lady of the house and she will even like using the polishing gear on her kitchen counters and stainless sink. The Porter Cable won't get you into trouble.

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