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Castrol Edge Synthetic Oil


Lexusfreak
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I've heard that Castrol is bringing a new synthetic oil called 'Edge' to the North American market soon (it's been available in overseas markets for a while now). Anyone know much about it? The U.S. website does not appear to be online yet (as of Feb 2, 09). Any info is appreciated, although I will assume it will be replacing their current 'Syntec' products. B)

Future site... http://www.castroledgeusa.com/

:cheers:

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I first heard about it from the Super Bowl Ad:

http://www.hulu.com/superbowl/55650/super-...il-edge-monkeys

I was not able to view the video with your link (only available to those in the U.S.). But I think this is the same ad on Youtube...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWIe7mbtrr8

:cheers:

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What makes it sooo special?

Castrol Edge doesn't appear to be any better than the Amsoil line of synthetics, which have been around much longer, offer guaranteed extended drain intervals, and cost much less. I'm sure it is a good product, but not good enough for me to spend that kind of money.

I used to frequently criticize Amsoil and people who used their products before I learned more about them and actually ended up becoming a dealer!

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It may be a bandaid, but at least I dont have sludge.....Yes it is a design failure, but if synthetic fixes the problem than that is a better choice than putting up with the stearlerships destroying your car. Believe me I have never seen such imcomptetance as my local dealership. So as good cheap insurance I would highly recommend the use of a superior lubricant. The less the car is touched by the dealership the better the chance of longevity.

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You guys are funny!

When is the last time anyone here has seen a lubrication based failure caused by the lubricant itself when changed per recommendations?

It seems the endless search for yet another expensive solution to a problem that doesn't exist is alive and well. :(

I come from a racing family. My dad, my uncles, my brother, my cousins and myself have all raced in pro comp's of one form or another. And none of us use an off the shelf oil. It's allways Amsoil, Penn, redline, Lucas, Joe Gibbs, Torko, etc. etc. Even Quaker State and Pennsoil have "racing" grade oils" and then have over the counter "retail" oil.

The reason?

Many of the key ingredients required to sustain a high performance engine have been greatly decreased or removed over the years due to tightening environmental regulations. The EPA, car manufacturers, and the American Petroleum Institute (API) have legislated the wear protection right out of the over the counter oils for the public. The reduction in Zinc and Phosphorus, which are key to reducing engine wear, has meant we have less protection in our high performance engines. Most if not all "new" oils introduced are more about following these EPA and API regulations and only "market" themselves as "improved" or "better". Premature engine wear and failure are beginning to be an increased concern. While the environmental effects have been reduced and although I'm all for cleaning up the environment, I'm also into protecting my investment. I've seen first hand motors opened up after 10 hours of comp on them using over the counter oils and it's not pretty! So, you may not see any performance differnce today, or even tommarrow, but what about a few years from now? Let's just for the sake of our discussion say that most motors last to 100k. as a general rule. But at what amount of compression loss and internal materials degradation? Sure, the motor will still run just fine at say 80% of the original compression, and so long as the car isn't under full throttle you probably won't notice it under daily driving conditions, but maybe if you used a better quality oil and the compression was maintained at 90%, then not only would you have more power on hand at 100k miles, but probably a bit better gas mileage also. Would this offset the cost of the oil? while you may spend a bit more over the long road, in the end, you still have a better result also.

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Apples to apples tho Smooth1...noone here is racing or even tracking their wife's daily driver.

I doubt that there are more than 10 of us here who have ever run a motor to redline on purpose, and fewer who have run at the track, much less compete.

I am with you that performance engines need performance oriented lubrication (not just fluids, but oil coolers, HV pumps etc), but momma's commuter is not put under these stresses.

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I believe synthetic lubricants have benefits, but at twice the price over dino oil, do I get twice the benefit?

Well, maybe you do not, but I believe I do. Her's why: I do not do much mileage on each of my cars - say 5K miles a year. 1. I have noticed improvement in smoothness and 'feel' of an engine when I switch to Mobil1, vs. dino oil. You can quibble about whether that would show up on a dynamometer, but it shows in the 'feel' I have of the car - of several cars I have owned, actually; and I like it - 2. I believe that synthetic oil allows me to space out oil changes - still at the same mileage interval, but not at the same 'time' interval: i.e. I can do one oil change a year (at 5K miles) instead of two; 3 'sludge issue', which I do not fully understand, but I do get some peace of mind knowing that knowing parties believe that it reduces or eliminates the possibility of getting a 'sludged' motor; 4. Synthetic oils used to have a somewhat wider effective viscosity range than dino oils. When I lived in Canada, the sentiment was that a synthetic oil with the same viscosity as a dino oil 'flows' better when starting from really cold, and maintains the higher viscosity end when hot better than dino. Again, don't know why, but this was a common belief. So, in summary, synthetic oil costs me more per oil change, but less per year, and I feel my engine runs smoother, and I'm happy about it.

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When is the last time anyone here has seen a lubrication based failure caused by the lubricant itself when changed per recommendations?

It seems the endless search for yet another expensive solution to a problem that doesn't exist is alive and well. :(

Superior lubrication is not the only reason people buy expensive motor oil. I HATE changing oil, and I don't trust anyone (quick lube) locally, nor am I going to drive 70 miles to pay Lexus $100 to change it for me. So, switching to Amsoil was an easy choice. Now, instead of changing the oil at least 5 times per year, I change it once. It is so nice. Also, my fuel economy has gone up 4%. I picked up an additional 1 mpg on the hwy after switching (yes, same driving style, speed, climate, traffic, terrain, octane, etc.). It saves money too. An oil change with Mobile 1 (and conventional oil is not much cheaper) cost me roughly $35 * 5 changes/year, so I would have spent $175/year on oil changes. Now, I spend $100/year on an Amsoil oil change. Saving time solves my problem. Saving money with improved fuel economy and less oil and filters to buy is just an added bonus. :)
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I admit that it's hard for me to just look at street applications and not include what I've learned at the tracks.

Let me use this as a quick example, when I buy my tires, I buy them to try to fit the most realistic extreme circumstances. Like hard braking in the rain, or an emergency stop that relies on the the tires ability to stop the car. A tire that I know will hold the road when I decide I wanna hammer this curve coming up, and won't break loose everytime I slam on the gas pedal so easily. I don't buy tires to fit just my everyday driving. If that were the case, then most any generic, hard compound tire would do. I buy my oil with that same logic. Stop and go traffic on a 95 degree day can achieve periods of time that are more than severe enouph.

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When is the last time anyone here has seen a lubrication based failure caused by the lubricant itself when changed per recommendations?

It seems the endless search for yet another expensive solution to a problem that doesn't exist is alive and well. :(

Superior lubrication is not the only reason people buy expensive motor oil. I HATE changing oil, and I don't trust anyone (quick lube) locally, nor am I going to drive 70 miles to pay Lexus $100 to change it for me. So, switching to Amsoil was an easy choice. Now, instead of changing the oil at least 5 times per year, I change it once. It is so nice. Also, my fuel economy has gone up 4%. I picked up an additional 1 mpg on the hwy after switching (yes, same driving style, speed, climate, traffic, terrain, octane, etc.). It saves money too. An oil change with Mobile 1 (and conventional oil is not much cheaper) cost me roughly $35 * 5 changes/year, so I would have spent $175/year on oil changes. Now, I spend $100/year on an Amsoil oil change. Saving time solves my problem. Saving money with improved fuel economy and less oil and filters to buy is just an added bonus. :)

I would strongly recommend against this practice with a Lexus still under warranty.

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