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97 Es300 With Exposed Metal From 'chips'


total1
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1997 ES300 Oyster; 71K miles (real low!)

We recently purchased our 3rd ES300 vintage 97/98. Now, we've notice a slight "double-pinhead" sized chip of paint off the corner of the left rear quarter panel where the trunk curves down toward the rear lights.

What are my options as I can see a little discoloration (no rust @ this time) on the quarter panel? It's soo small I hate to have a full/partial paint job so I'm looking for some 'rubbing compound' or rust inhibitor. I've virtually positive that the base metal has been slightly compromized.

TIA

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Can you post a pic or two of the area in question?

Perhaps all it needs is some touch up paint.

:cheers:

The spots are so small that, in some ways, purchasing Lexus 97 Oyster touchup paint might be overkill. OTOH, over time, it'll probably have a growing rust spot but we garage the Lexus as much as we can.

Just because we touchup the paint doesn't seal the paint in does it? Does PepBoys or AutoZone have any applicable touch-up paint or clear coverings? [i'm not a real fan of the 'local' Lexus dealership as I get all my work performed by a local Toyota dealership who does a great job!] I only noticed the spot when I was unloading the trunk on Saturday PM in the sun.

I'll see if I can get some pictures this evening for posting.

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You need to get a paint chip pen (don't know what else to call it) from your local auto parts supplier who carries paint supplies. Its a plastic pen that has glass fibres for removing rust from small paint chipped areas on car hoods etc. With it you scrape through the rust down to bare metal. Then using a tooth pick as a paint brush, you put a tiny dab of primer paint ( get some good primer in a spray bomb, spray a small amount into the cap of the spray bomb, and then use the tooth pick to transfer a small dab as described )onto the bare metal of the chipped area, but ensure that it stays below the surface of the finished coats of paint on the fender. If you can verify that there is no rust, and don't need the chip pen, then go to the primer stage just described. Give the primer a day to cure. Then get the touch up paint stick from the dealer for your colour code, and again use a tooth pick as before to fill the chip to slightly above the surrounding paint's surface. Let it cure for at least a week before attempting to sand the chipped area down to the level of the surrounding painted surface, using at least a 1500 - 2000 grit wet/dry colour sanding paper(if this is even necessary since the paint may well sink to the same level as what surrounds it). At this point all that remains is to polish the sanded area with an appropriate compound. You may wish to leave these last two steps (sanding and polishing) to a professional, who should be able to do such a small area in in less than 20 minutes. Then again, you may be pleased enough with your results and not feel the need to even do the sanding and polishing. I used this same procedure on all of my cars for years with excellent results that are usually invisible. Good Luck!

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You need to get a paint chip pen (don't know what else to call it) from your local auto parts supplier who carries paint supplies. Its a plastic pen that has glass fibres for removing rust from small paint chipped areas on car hoods etc. With it you scrape through the rust down to bare metal. Then using a tooth pick as a paint brush, you put a tiny dab of primer paint ( get some good primer in a spray bomb, spray a small amount into the cap of the spray bomb, and then use the tooth pick to transfer a small dab as described )onto the bare metal of the chipped area, but ensure that it stays below the surface of the finished coats of paint on the fender. If you can verify that there is no rust, and don't need the chip pen, then go to the primer stage just described. Give the primer a day to cure. Then get the touch up paint stick from the dealer for your colour code, and again use a tooth pick as before to fill the chip to slightly above the surrounding paint's surface. Let it cure for at least a week before attempting to sand the chipped area down to the level of the surrounding painted surface, using at least a 1500 - 2000 grit wet/dry colour sanding paper(if this is even necessary since the paint may well sink to the same level as what surrounds it). At this point all that remains is to polish the sanded area with an appropriate compound. You may wish to leave these last two steps (sanding and polishing) to a professional, who should be able to do such a small area in in less than 20 minutes. Then again, you may be pleased enough with your results and not feel the need to even do the sanding and polishing. I used this same procedure on all of my cars for years with excellent results that are usually invisible. Good Luck!

Here is the best picture that I took this evening...1MB file with high resolution on a 7Mpxl camera (Olympus, fwiw)

post-7398-1208919366_thumb.jpg

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Yup, all you need is the touch up paint pen (less than $10) from your Lexus dealers parts department. Easy fix. ;) Might want to use a bit of polishing compound on the area first & get rid of the scratch & you should be good to go. :)

:cheers:

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