Do Not Sell My Personal Information Jump to content

Rx 350 Vs Rx 400h ?


Recommended Posts

First, let's look at fuel consumption:

RX400h EPA estimates: 27 city, 24 hwy, 25 combined, annual fuel cost: $2094, 7.3 tons of C02/year, regular fuel OK

RX350 EPA estimates: 18 city, 23 hwy, 20 combined, annual fuel cost: $2618 (15,000 miles), 9.2 tons of CO2/year, premium fuel required

As you can see, it may not make sense to by the 400h if you plan to sell it after only a few years or if you drive mostly on open highway. However, heavy city driving means payback comes much sooner. Depending upon the difference in vehicle and fuel costs, a 6-7 year payback is fairly common.

Power: The RX400h, while rated 2 HP below the RX350, utilizes its electric motor torque to provide a more enhanced "seat-of-the-pants" sensation when accelerating. 0-60 MPH in 6.7 seconds is possible. The RX350's 0-60 peaks at 7.1 seconds.

Transmission: Continuously variable trannies are much smoother than any non-CVT transmission.

Noise level: The RX400h is certainly noisier during very brisk acceleration, since the electric motor(s) make their presence known. However, under normal driving conditions, noise levels of each are very similar. During slow-moving and stop & go driving, there is no contest - the 400h is dead silent.

Braking: Similar, although the 400hs pads will most likely far outlast those of the 350, due to regenerative braking assist.

Resale value: As a general rule, the higher the fuel costs, the higher the resale value for hybrid vehicles and the lower the resale value for non-hybrids.

PS: I see that you've already made your decision, but feel free to comment about anything we post.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi on my last trip on city streets with my 2007 RX400h i got 33mpg it was a 52 mile trip to a neighboring county. i make this same trip about once a month. last time it was 32mpg. of course i babied it to see what i could do. normally i get 25-27 in the city cause i like to jump on it at the lights. what fun - this is a great car - had it a year -so far absolutly no problems. richard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Lexus comparison may well be worth consideration but with 37,185 miles on my RX400h, my REAL lifetime average is 22.52 miles per gallon. Most of my driving has been in town. I have NEVER seen 25 mpg for in town driving in Dallas Texas. Bottom line, don't take those numbers too serious except possibly their relative values. As I drive down the street in my old LS400, my V-8 gets as good or better mileage that the RX400h. Those stops at traffic lights allow the V-8 to guzzle the gas. Hmmm, maybe I need to turn off the engine at traffic lights :rolleyes: ... well, maybe not! The 'MPG' monitor is usually 2 mpg greater than actual mpg achieved!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We AVERAGE 25 MPG, city and highway, so I tend to think the most recent EPA ratings are dead-on for many people, especially when you look at results reported here in this forum. As I mentioned, those who see traffic on a daily basis will "pay back" their RX400h premium over the RX350 even faster than I mentioned above.

Under the same driving conditions, our Nissan Quest averaged 17 MPG.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've averaged 26 mpg on our '08 400h, very good for a big heavy SUV. The only reason we went with a hybrid was so the wife could use the HOV lanes in her commute.

MPG is not a good reason to buy a hybrid, payback is too long.

RX400h, what are the differences in CO output (not CO2)?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim,

The EPA website from which that data was copied did not list CO, just CO2.

The EPA city difference is staggering - with the RX400h benefitting from a whopping 50% increase over that of the RX350.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

RX400, really? RX350 required premium fuel? I used to put 91 on my RX400h, but my dealer told me I can put in 89, where I live 89 and 87 are the same price, so I started to put in 89 since last week. I haven't calculate the MPG yet, but I suspect it's about 1 MPG less when I use 89 rather than 91. But I think that $.20 different per gallon is worth it.

For those who are still undecided about RX400h or RX350. Yesterday I drove about 15 miles circle around the lake, speed at 20-25 MPH, the gas engine was completely turned off during 95% of the trip. Man it felt GOOD! Imagine what the RX350 would cost you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

RX400, really? RX350 required premium fuel? I used to put 91 on my RX400h, but my dealer told me I can put in 89, where I live 89 and 87 are the same price, so I started to put in 89 since last week. I haven't calculate the MPG yet, but I suspect it's about 1 MPG less when I use 89 rather than 91. But I think that $.20 different per gallon is worth it.

For those who are still undecided about RX400h or RX350. Yesterday I drove about 15 miles circle around the lake, speed at 20-25 MPH, the gas engine was completely turned off during 95% of the trip. Man it felt GOOD! Imagine what the RX350 would cost you.

The MPG "gains", FE improvements, "FUEL" recovery, are only obtained during coastdown periods, braking periods, or downhill runs that basically amount to long coastdown periods.

Getting improved FE while driving along the freeway at a relatively constant speed results ONLY from the fact that your RX400h has a severely DETUNED V6 engine. So it would be a total and complete waste of money to fuel it with anything higher than the lowest grade fuel commercially avaulable.

Since the other, "opposite"(the ICE), CVT/ETDT (Electronic Torque Distributing Transmission) torque input(s) must be continuously driven even at constant highway speeds the hybrid system is actually a detriment in that circumstance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I've gotten the RX350 as a loaner.

I have the '08 ES 350 today and neither one compares very well with my 400h. It's not because I own the 400h, it's just a fact. Drive them yourself. The 400h feels like it has more power especially on the freeway. I drive the same freeway from the dealership to home and with both the RX350 and this ES 350 they both feel like they hesitate a little on acceleration and on the sloping upgrade there's really no comparison. The RX 400h pulls you quickly and smoothly on the freeway and the upslope doesn't make one iota of difference to my "Princess". I also live atop a beautiful and high hill and the changing of gears was very evident this morning with the ES as was with the RX 350 and nothing that I feel with the CVT of the 400h. I was irritated by the rattles that I had when I first bought the 400h but then I found the causes,yes, more than one, and now it's quiet. I love that I get 400 miles per fill up (I get just over 26MPG for the past 2 1/2 years)... great, especially here in L.A. where gas is already $4. I have gotten 450 (27+MPG but not enough to claim that I get 27 regularly because I don't...) The only thing that I loved in the 350 that I didn't get was the wooden steering wheel...which I now have thanks to eBay! I drive mostly city but a good amount of freeway also from time to time...but here in L.A. , the freeways are like parking lots many times so my MPGs actually get better when I am on the freeways more often. L.A....I love this city but I can't imagine not having my hybrid here of all places! Many warm wishes, Rey Bustos in L.A.

post-26996-1207595760_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I've gotten the RX350 as a loaner.

I have the '08 ES 350 today and neither one compares very well with my 400h. It's not because I own the 400h, it's just a fact. Drive them yourself. The 400h feels like it has a lot more power especially on the freeway. I drive the same freeway from the dealership to home and with both the RX350 and this ES 350 they both feel like they hesitate a little on acceleration and on the sloping upgrade there's really no comparison. The RX 400h pulls you quickly and smoothly on the freeway and the upslope doesn't make one iota of difference to my "Princess". I also live atop a beautiful and high hill and the changing of gears was very evident this morning with the ES as was with the RX 350 and nothing that I feel with the CVT of the 400h. I was irritated by the rattles that I had when I first bought the 400h but then I found the causes,yes, more than one, and now it's perfect. I love that I get 400 miles per fill up (I get just over 26MPG for the past 2 1/2 years)... great, especially here in L.A. where gas is already $4. I have gotten 450 (27+MPG but not enough to claim that I get 27 regularly because I don't...) The only thing that I loved in the 350 that I didn't get was the wooden steering wheel...which I now have thanks to eBay! I drive mostly city but a good amount of freeway also from time to time...but here in L.A. , the freeways are like parking lots many times so my MPGs actually get better when I am on the freeways more often. L.A....I love this city but I can't imagine not having my hybrid here of all places! Many warm wishes, Rey Bustos in L.A.

I once got to 395 miles before filling 15.1 gallons to my tank. I read the manual somewhere, it said the tank capacity is 17.5, can someone confirm that?

I know what you mean, I visited L.A a couple of times, and driving from LAX to Irvine during rush hours or even before rush hours was brutal. The traffic was sitting still, I rent an Altima 2.5 liter and got only 17.4 MPG the entire trip. HORRIBLE. Your RX400h definitely comes in handy in big cities like L.A.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17.2 gallons.

Yes, everyone in L.A. should have a hybrid. It's perfect for a big city without an autobahn! The freeways here are nutty and many times you drive stop and go. On Sunday mornings I can open her up but that's a rarity. I do like the few times I pushed the gas and went from 70-105 in a flash! The car is so smooth at fast speeds it's amazing....but then I have never had a car that was good enough for that kind of speed and or quality. My last car was a PT Cruiser and kids on skate boards used to pass me up. RB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The MPG "gains", FE improvements, "FUEL" recovery, are only obtained during coastdown periods, braking periods, or downhill runs that basically amount to long coastdown periods.

Partially true. Slow and stop & go driving in high traffic conditions are often on very level roads. This is where the RX400h really shines. As Rey mentioned, even a small car can get terrible mileage under these conditions. If you live in a big city and have to drive to work every day, payback on the 400h will come very quickly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, even a small car gets terrible MPGs in a big L.A. type city. I never got better than 18MPGs with my PT Cruiser and was lucky if I got 220 miles on one tank, usually I'd fill up with about 13 gallons and drive about 220 miles as opposed to around 15 gallons and 400 miles with my 400h...) Anyway, it's the fact that on the freeways here I am often in electric mode that makes me cringe what I see a million cars around me burning and burning fuel at idle or 20 MPH in rush hour. Toodle-loo, Rey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

:rolleyes:

First, let's look at fuel consumption:

RX400h EPA estimates: 27 city, 24 hwy, 25 combined, annual fuel cost: $2094, 7.3 tons of C02/year, regular fuel OK

RX350 EPA estimates: 18 city, 23 hwy, 20 combined, annual fuel cost: $2618 (15,000 miles), 9.2 tons of CO2/year, premium fuel required

As you can see, it may not make sense to by the 400h if you plan to sell it after only a few years or if you drive mostly on open highway. However, heavy city driving means payback comes much sooner. Depending upon the difference in vehicle and fuel costs, a 6-7 year payback is fairly common.

Power: The RX400h, while rated 2 HP below the RX350, utilizes its electric motor torque to provide a more enhanced "seat-of-the-pants" sensation when accelerating. 0-60 MPH in 6.7 seconds is possible. The RX350's 0-60 peaks at 7.1 seconds.

Transmission: Continuously variable trannies are much smoother than any non-CVT transmission.

Noise level: The RX400h is certainly noisier during very brisk acceleration, since the electric motor(s) make their presence known. However, under normal driving conditions, noise levels of each are very similar. During slow-moving and stop & go driving, there is no contest - the 400h is dead silent.

Braking: Similar, although the 400hs pads will most likely far outlast those of the 350, due to regenerative braking assist.

Resale value: As a general rule, the higher the fuel costs, the higher the resale value for hybrid vehicles and the lower the resale value for non-hybrids.

PS: I see that you've already made your decision, but feel free to comment about anything we post.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:rolleyes:
First, let's look at fuel consumption:

RX400h EPA estimates: 27 city, 24 hwy, 25 combined, annual fuel cost: $2094, 7.3 tons of C02/year, regular fuel OK

RX350 EPA estimates: 18 city, 23 hwy, 20 combined, annual fuel cost: $2618 (15,000 miles), 9.2 tons of CO2/year, premium fuel required

As you can see, it may not make sense to by the 400h if you plan to sell it after only a few years or if you drive mostly on open highway. However, heavy city driving means payback comes much sooner. Depending upon the difference in vehicle and fuel costs, a 6-7 year payback is fairly common.

Power: The RX400h, while rated 2 HP below the RX350, utilizes its electric motor torque to provide a more enhanced "seat-of-the-pants" sensation when accelerating. 0-60 MPH in 6.7 seconds is possible. The RX350's 0-60 peaks at 7.1 seconds.

Transmission: Continuously variable trannies are much smoother than any non-CVT transmission.

Noise level: The RX400h is certainly noisier during very brisk acceleration, since the electric motor(s) make their presence known. However, under normal driving conditions, noise levels of each are very similar. During slow-moving and stop & go driving, there is no contest - the 400h is dead silent.

Braking: Similar, although the 400hs pads will most likely far outlast those of the 350, due to regenerative braking assist.

Resale value: As a general rule, the higher the fuel costs, the higher the resale value for hybrid vehicles and the lower the resale value for non-hybrids.

PS: I see that you've already made your decision, but feel free to comment about anything we post.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Forums


News


Membership