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1993 Es300 Axle Replacement


Merrill
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I have some questions about replacing my front axles, which have been clicking and popping for about 3000 miles now. I have the parts, but I am hesitant on getting into this project because A. it will take the car off the road, and B. my time is precious and i dont want to mess with it and C. i dont have a step by step guide to the project. Of course I realize that waiting until they snap could cause both A. and B.

my questions are:

Will i need specilized tools to do this project like pullers and shock/spring compressors?

i have heard this is a 4 hour job per axle- which is what the shop will charge me for and what others have said it will take me. Is this true?

Is it a complex project? I replaced the timing belt/waterpump/harmonic balancer/shaft seal by myself about 5000 miles ago and i would call that complicated.

Is it easy to replace the struts, mounts, and bushings while the axles are being pulled or does it not make a differnce if the axle is pulled out at the time?

thoughts, suggestions much appreciated.

-Merrill

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I have some questions about replacing my front axles, which have been clicking and popping for about 3000 miles now. I have the parts, but I am hesitant on getting into this project because A. it will take the car off the road, and B. my time is precious and i dont want to mess with it and C. i dont have a step by step guide to the project. Of course I realize that waiting until they snap could cause both A. and B.

my questions are:

Will i need specilized tools to do this project like pullers and shock/spring compressors?

i have heard this is a 4 hour job per axle- which is what the shop will charge me for and what others have said it will take me. Is this true?

Is it a complex project? I replaced the timing belt/waterpump/harmonic balancer/shaft seal by myself about 5000 miles ago and i would call that complicated.

Is it easy to replace the struts, mounts, and bushings while the axles are being pulled or does it not make a differnce if the axle is pulled out at the time?

thoughts, suggestions much appreciated.

-Merrill

Assuming the 93 is the same as the 94, its a cake walk after you've done it a few times. It really doesn't take anything special to do it, either. Although a great help is to have a set of allen head drive sockets. The cv axles are bolted in with allen bolts, and they are torqued well, so it will take some leverage or an impact to loosen them. I can't recall the size it uses directly off the top of my head, but its fairly big. You should be able to see them when you pull the wheel off.

I've done this so many times since I own another toyota and also my mother in law has one. First take off the wheel. Then pull the cotter pin out of the center of the hub. Then the little metal cap that goes on behind it, and then use an impact to pull the big nut off of the axle. Once that is done, go ahead and take the 2 bolts out of the brake caliper and put the caliper to the side. Then take the 2 bolts out of the bracket that holds the caliper in place. Now you can remove the rotor. You can go ahead and disconnect the tie rod from the hub, it has a cotter pin in it and you can use either a forked wedge or 2 screwdrivers to pry it off of the hub. I have noticed that I can wiggle the axle out while leaving this hooked up though, so you might want to do that just for ease. Then theres 2 bolts on the top of the hub that bolt it into the strut. I usually just pull the nuts off of one side and then use a punch and a hammer to drive the bolts out, since they are under a slight load. There are also 2 nuts and a bolt on the underside of the hub that should come out. Once all the bolts are out, the hub should be free to move around. If you still have the tie rod hooked up, just roll the hub forward, run the axle nut back on a few threads and then tap it with a hammer. This will push the axle backwards out of the hub, once it starts moving you can take the nut back off so that the axle will slide out of the hub.

Now all you have to do is pull the allen bolts out of the cv axle and then you are set.

While you have the hub assembly disconnected, it is a good time to change your struts, since all that is holding them in is the bolts on the top side. If you are changing them, however, you will need a spring compressor tool. You can get one on loan from autozone or just buy one at harbor freight for like 10 bucks. If you attempt to do the struts, be extremely careful. The springs will be under alot of pressure, so if one goes flying it could kill someone.

The passenger side cv axle has 2 parts. There is an inner and outer. The outer is just like the drivers side one, but the inner is held with a lock bolt and a snap ring. This is a bit trickier to take apart, but chances are the only axles you'll need to replace are the outer ones.

Anyhow, this is definitely not a 4 hour job in a shop, unless they are changing both outer and the one inner axle. Since these axles bolt in, it is alot easier in and out with them than it is with most cars, they usually have a snap ring type thing on them so you have to snap them into place and then snap them out, I call it the crowbar special ^_^. Hope this helps.

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I very much appreciate that post.

I have purchased the axle assemblies already- they are identical for both passenger and driver side. there are two rubber boots, one on each end. I assume this is what you meant by an inner and outer assembly. I have to fill these boots with grease and then install them. What kind of grease is best to use that will not destroy the rubber? i am looking to get another 140k miles out of these axles so i want to do it right.

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I very much appreciate that post.

I have purchased the axle assemblies already- they are identical for both passenger and driver side. there are two rubber boots, one on each end. I assume this is what you meant by an inner and outer assembly. I have to fill these boots with grease and then install them. What kind of grease is best to use that will not destroy the rubber? i am looking to get another 140k miles out of these axles so i want to do it right.

No, thats not what I meant by inner and outer. When you remove the passenger side cv axle, you will see that it bolts into another axle that is held in place by a carrier. I think that inner axle is called a "halfshaft" or something like that.

Are you talking about the cv boots ? I've only had to grease those when I put a new boot kit on an axle. With new cv axles usually those boots are already strapped onto the axle, and have grease in them. The part of the axle that bolts up against the transmission needs to be packed with grease though for sure. Every one i've done has had a tube of grease that came in the box with the axles. Your best bet is just to ask the parts store you got it from, if they have any idea what they are doing they'll know what you need. If you have a choice though, one of my favorites with grease and lubricants is royal purple. It rocks.

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  • 2 weeks later...

ok i replaced these axles, and when i drive straight they rattle. rattling stops when i turn. rattling is worse on bumps but also there is some rattling when driving over totally smooth road. what could be the deal? i packed them totally full of grease on the transmission side, and the wheel side was sealed and i cant get into that side. autozone said that side came pre-greased. all bolts are tight. the rattling is slightly worse on the driver side.

Ideas?

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ok i replaced these axles, and when i drive straight they rattle. rattling stops when i turn. rattling is worse on bumps but also there is some rattling when driving over totally smooth road. what could be the deal? i packed them totally full of grease on the transmission side, and the wheel side was sealed and i cant get into that side. autozone said that side came pre-greased. all bolts are tight. the rattling is slightly worse on the driver side.

Ideas?

Are you sure its coming from the cv axles? The only way I could see them making noise is obviously if they are worn out, or if the bolts that go into the transmission were loose. Make sure you check all of the bolts you had to loosen to change the axles. On my celica, I had a continuing issue with the bolts on the underside of the hub assembly coming loose due to vibration (from a wheel bearing going out) If your cv axle bearings were rattling, then it'd be more evident in turning than while driving straight.

Another thing to check is the caliper bolts that hold the brake caliper and pads in place, as well as making sure you got plenty of torque on the cv axle nut (the big one on the end of the axles.

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ok i replaced these axles, and when i drive straight they rattle. rattling stops when i turn. rattling is worse on bumps but also there is some rattling when driving over totally smooth road. what could be the deal? i packed them totally full of grease on the transmission side, and the wheel side was sealed and i cant get into that side. autozone said that side came pre-greased. all bolts are tight. the rattling is slightly worse on the driver side.

Ideas?

One thought. . .

Did you torque the hub 'nut' when you reinstalled the rotor assembly??

Your description matches a bearing (inside the rotor assembly) being loose.

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