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Rx300 Transmission Problems


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Transmission troubles with RX300s are discussed frequently here, but I'm not clear on which models are affected. Specifically, I have a 2000 RX300 two-wheel drive. Am I likely to have problems, or are those problems usually with all-wheel drive cars?

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Transmission troubles with RX300s are discussed frequently here, but I'm not clear on which models are affected. Specifically, I have a 2000 RX300 two-wheel drive. Am I likely to have problems, or are those problems usually with all-wheel drive cars?

The failures seem to involve, predominantly, the '99 RXes, and yes, mostly the AWD Models. There have been, seemingly, an inordinately high level of '00 models involved.

It has been my guess that in the process of "porting", "beefing up, the Camry transaxle to/for the much heavier RX it was discovered that it too prone to overheating. One of the common ways to address that issue is to design in more ATF cooling capacity provided the heating effect isn't localized to some internal component. In this case it appears that the heating was localized to the gear type ATF pump and so the fixed displacement pumping capacity of this pump was significantly reduced.

While this also had the added advantage of improving FE to a not insignificant level, the disadvantage was that the shift pattern/schedule had to be modified to eliminate some of the standard, legacy, gear changes that we all have come to expect. Basically the transaxles will now not only not downshift into 1st gear until you come to a full and complete stop, they actually upshift during 10-0 MPH coastdowns when coming to a stop....OR NOT. That gives the driver the "seat of the pants" feeling of being bumped from behind as the transaxle upshifts at ~7MPH and the RX "surges" forward due to the sudden unexpected release of engine compression braking.

The same thing happens during closed throttle coastdowns at 40-30 MPH but in this case drivers seem to refer to the feeling as a "slingshot effect".

Toyota soon discovered the flaw in the design when the '99 models, after 70-80,000 miles started requiring new transaxles.

It appears that the first reaction, QUICK fix, was as one would expect, bore the gear type ATF pump back out to the original pumping capacity, or at least nearby. Of course that REQUIRED more cooling capacity. So you might find it hard, or maybe impossible, to locate an '01 -'03 RX absent the (supposedly optional) towing parkage which included the extra ATF cooling radiator/heat exchanger. The change may have been made mid-production run of the '00 MY.

In any case even with the extra cooling capacity the '01-03 RXes seem to have a problem with BURNED ATF in as little as 40,000 miles so the factory has revised the ATF drain/refill/flush schedule from infinity to every 15,000 miles.

Going back to an earlier issue, it appeared that reducing the ATF pumping capacity had been a good idea as there was a significant improvement in FE as a result. So Toyota began to adopt this design aspect across the board, all FWD and F/AWD vehicles.

My guess is that since there is all the space one needs for a ROBUST RWD or R/AWD transmission there was no reason for migrating this design aspect to the RWD. On the other hand seeing as how the space was available the RWD & R/AWD models may have gone directly to a variable displacement ATF pump, just as Ford has now done with the new FWD Edge.

But a more permanent solution, other than the '01-03 RX "compromise" solution which clearly led to the ATF overheating problems, had to be found.

And that led to the adoption of DBW, e-throttling.

With DBW the engine could be prevented from developing a high level of torque, basically nothing above idle, until the downsized ATF pump could provide enough flow/pressure to fully and firmly seat the newly engaged transaxle clutches.

Adopted, apparently (very likely under some duress), with little or NO real world testing.

No testing for conditions that might require, result, in a bit of throttle "dithering" by the driver.

Say in an acceleration lane, accelerating, entering a freeway, and the driver lifts the throttle as s/he glances over their left shoulder, sees an upcoming "spot" and then re-applies throttle pressure.

Initially accelerating = lower gear ratio/.... throttle lift = UPSHIFT/... re-apply throttle = downshift....!!

Two transaxle shifts within mere seconds, or less, the latter of those with the engine idling....

The second one, for the acceleration level YOU feel you now need (for safe entry into the FAST(ER) moving oncoming traffic), will have to wait, 1-2 seconds and only then will the engine torque, via DBW, be allowed to begin rising.

Reports of this 1-2 second delay/hesitation seem to be continuing into the '08 model year.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Someone did a poll a while back and there were owners of the 2WD model that reported transmission failure. The no maintenance, lifetime fluid listed in the owners service manual is the main culpret. I'm sure there are other factors involved including driving habits and the weight of the vehicle.

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I have a 2000 rx300 and I have 116k miles on it. I've had to replace my transmission twice since i've had it. And I've only had it for 2.5 years now. So I think it may only be the AWD model which is what i have.

Just check the model code found on the driver's side door, at the bottom under the barcode.

MCU10 = FWD (2WD)

MCU15 = AWD (4 WD)

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I have a 2000 rx300 and I have 116k miles on it. I've had to replace my transmission twice since i've had it. And I've only had it for 2.5 years now. So I think it may only be the AWD model which is what i have.

Just check the model code found on the driver's side door, at the bottom under the barcode.

MCU10 = FWD (2WD)

MCU15 = AWD (4 WD)

I am having trans problems with my '00 rx300. If I take off too fast, and by that I don't mean real fast, it often will not shift into overdrive. I can pull over, turn off the ignition a sec and restart and as long as I acellerate slowly, it will shift fine. When in overdrive, I can turn the OD button on and off and it will downshift and shift back just fine as well, it just does it when acellerating from take-off or lower gears. Anyone have this problem? If so, what was the cause, and how much can I expect to pay to have it fixed (short of just buying a completely rebuilt transmission)?

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Its not going to go in overdrive while accelerating hard, If you do a smooth acceleration than it will shift to overdrive when the right speed is obtained.

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Its not going to go in overdrive while accelerating hard, If you do a smooth acceleration than it will shift to overdrive when the right speed is obtained.

O/D is locked out, disabled, until the engine and transaxle reach normal operating temperatures. Additionally as the engine ages, wear and whatnot, the ECU will become more reluctant to use O/D since the engine might no longer be able to produce enough torque at lower engine RPM O/D roadspeed levels. This latter symptom will be more pronounced with a cold engine as the rings are not yet fully sealing the cylinders.

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  • 5 months later...

We have a simular problem, we own for many years a RX300 ( year 2000 ), 2WD. Last month the check engine light came on, we own a universal garage so I connected a OBDII scan tool and found code 0171 ( bank 1 lean ) My first thought was : probably a bad oxygen sensor, but I connected a Elmscan interface to my laptop and all voltage readings seemed to be correct. I did reset the OBDII code 0171 and test drove again the car with scantool connected, at that moment the overdrive was working, after a mile the check engine light came on and after 10 seconds the overdrive was gone. I did read the OBDII scantool and again the same 0171. I decided to reset this code again, continued my testdriving and yes at that moment the overdrive was working, but after one or two miles check engine light came on and overdrive not working anymore. I have been reading on several forums and know I'm not the only one with overdrive problems. I think the problem is not inside the transmission, we did oil changes / oil filter every 30k miles. Could this problem be related to the knock sensors ? Can anyone give me a logical explanation for this ? Andy / Dutch Caribbean.

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We have a simular problem, we own for many years a RX300 ( year 2000 ), 2WD. Last month the check engine light came on, we own a universal garage so I connected a OBDII scan tool and found code 0171 ( bank 1 lean ) My first thought was : probably a bad oxygen sensor, but I connected a Elmscan interface to my laptop and all voltage readings seemed to be correct. I did reset the OBDII code 0171 and test drove again the car with scantool connected, at that moment the overdrive was working, after a mile the check engine light came on and after 10 seconds the overdrive was gone. I did read the OBDII scantool and again the same 0171. I decided to reset this code again, continued my testdriving and yes at that moment the overdrive was working, but after one or two miles check engine light came on and overdrive not working anymore. I have been reading on several forums and know I'm not the only one with overdrive problems. I think the problem is not inside the transmission, we did oil changes / oil filter every 30k miles. Could this problem be related to the knock sensors ? Can anyone give me a logical explanation for this ? Andy / Dutch Caribbean.

Sounds like it's definitely sensor related. My first guess is a bad o2 sensor that is falsing or just aged/contaminated and the ecm is getting a weak or intemittent signal and shutting down the OD. Did you check all the wiring to the o2 sensor? (wild a$$ guess). The knock sensor would be my second choice. But the fact that your OD works for a few miles before it throws a code says to me the o2 sensor is the culprit. I have had o2 sensors read fine cold and then weak after heating up. Very common on motorcycles where they use really cheap o2 sensors. It could be a trans sensor but I doubt it.

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I don't know if this is the place to ask the question, but the initial heading indicated that it was related to RX300 transmission problems...

I have a '99 RX300, AWD, 66.5 K miles. We drive only about 4-5K miles per year on it. Well maintained by Lexus: we got it 20K miles ago, five years ago, and the 60,000 miles maintenance (on which I got 'hosed' by the Lexus dealer) included a transmission oil change. Question is: given all I have read on this Forum, should I sell the RX within a year or so (70K miles and thus hopefully avoid transmission problems), or not? Another way of putting it: does anyone know what % of '99 RX300s AWD see transmission problems at 75-80K miles? Or is the % real small (but, understandably, vocal about the failure)?

Many thanks for those who venture an opinion in reply!

pauljcl

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From what I've read, "there are an abnormally high number of RX300's in the 99/00 year range that has had transmission failures". The question is what this means. You've got to take into account the RX model is Lexus's highest selling model upon it's release (over 370,000 units in the RX300 model years). With that said, it could be only 1% failure rate, but that's still 3700 vehicles. I do know that many of the 99/00 RX's go well beyond 150K on the factory transmission.

If I were the owner of your vehicle, I would keep it, keep an eye on the transmission fluid color, do regular maintenance, keep an eye out for any signs of issues, and just enjoy the vehicle. If you treat it nicely and care for it, it should treat you nicely and be good to you.

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We have a simular problem, we own for many years a RX300 ( year 2000 ), 2WD. Last month the check engine light came on, we own a universal garage so I connected a OBDII scan tool and found code 0171 ( bank 1 lean ) My first thought was : probably a bad oxygen sensor, but I connected a Elmscan interface to my laptop and all voltage readings seemed to be correct. I did reset the OBDII code 0171 and test drove again the car with scantool connected, at that moment the overdrive was working, after a mile the check engine light came on and after 10 seconds the overdrive was gone. I did read the OBDII scantool and again the same 0171. I decided to reset this code again, continued my testdriving and yes at that moment the overdrive was working, but after one or two miles check engine light came on and overdrive not working anymore. I have been reading on several forums and know I'm not the only one with overdrive problems. I think the problem is not inside the transmission, we did oil changes / oil filter every 30k miles. Could this problem be related to the knock sensors ? Can anyone give me a logical explanation for this ? Andy / Dutch Caribbean.

Hello - I think I know what the prob. is - and the good side is that it'll only cost you less than $5 to fix. The bad side - you're going to have to go in there and do it yourself - but it's very rewarding.

P0171 means your ECU detects engine is running lean - so it compensates by injecting more/less air/fuel mixture and you will notice that your fuel consumption will rise and you may be loosing power right now.

Ofcourse your O/D will not work/engage because your car will be in limp/safe mode to protect itself until prob. detected is fixed and check engine light is out.

Now before you replace sensors and spend $$$ unnecessarily - do this.

Take out/remove your Mass Airflow Sensor that sits in the beginning of your air intake just behind your air filter box.

There are only 2 screws (star) and remove it carefully make sure no dust/debris goes in there.

It is a small cylindrical plastic housing that's black in color and when you look inside there is/are resistors in there that will look grimey/dirty.

Be careful when unplugging the wiring harness and connector that is plugged into it before removal.

Now you would need this $5 part - actually less at Wal-Mart - it is a spray cleaner called Electronic Cleaner in a can. You will find this in the oil/gas additives section of Wal-Mart. Don't get the carb cleaner as this does not dry as fast as the electronic cleaner.

You will use this Electronic cleaner to spray onto those resistors to absorb and clean all that dirt and grime that is covering the resistors.

Let it dry 5-10 minutes then install back.

Now clear your Check Engine error codes with your Scan Tool.

NOw drive it and tell me how it behaves now - you will notice an increase in power.

This MAF normally gets dirty easy and needs to be cleaned a few times a year.

If you take this to the Stealership - they will replace it instead. They won't clean it - why? If they can sell you a part...?..

They are not cheap - maybe $250~$350 plus install ~$150 - but it'll only take you a few minutes to perform.

This will fix your problem unless there's another problem down-stream - if the Check Engine light goes back on again - but I doubt it - because your error code only says P0171 and nothing else - correct?

Also replace your air filter anyway - cheap guarantee - and vacuum the dirt inside your air filter box.

Let us know...

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From what I've read, "there are an abnormally high number of RX300's in the 99/00 year range that has had transmission failures". The question is what this means. You've got to take into account the RX model is Lexus's highest selling model upon it's release (over 370,000 units in the RX300 model years). With that said, it could be only 1% failure rate, but that's still 3700 vehicles. I do know that many of the 99/00 RX's go well beyond 150K on the factory transmission.

If I were the owner of your vehicle, I would keep it, keep an eye on the transmission fluid color, do regular maintenance, keep an eye out for any signs of issues, and just enjoy the vehicle. If you treat it nicely and care for it, it should treat you nicely and be good to you.

Thanks much for your opinion. I think I will have the transmission oil monitored every oil change (5,000 miles), and see what happens. I am waiting for the 'newer' breed of cars to appear - smaller/ more FE SUVs (hybrid or electric or hydrogen of not) and will then change vehicle... Are there any 'driving' signs tha the transmission is beginning to 'go' that I should be aware of?

Tks. again!

pauljcl

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From what I've read, "there are an abnormally high number of RX300's in the 99/00 year range that has had transmission failures". The question is what this means. You've got to take into account the RX model is Lexus's highest selling model upon it's release (over 370,000 units in the RX300 model years). With that said, it could be only 1% failure rate, but that's still 3700 vehicles. I do know that many of the 99/00 RX's go well beyond 150K on the factory transmission.

If I were the owner of your vehicle, I would keep it, keep an eye on the transmission fluid color, do regular maintenance, keep an eye out for any signs of issues, and just enjoy the vehicle. If you treat it nicely and care for it, it should treat you nicely and be good to you.

Thanks much for your opinion. I think I will have the transmission oil monitored every oil change (5,000 miles), and see what happens. I am waiting for the 'newer' breed of cars to appear - smaller/ more FE SUVs (hybrid or electric or hydrogen of not) and will then change vehicle... Are there any 'driving' signs tha the transmission is beginning to 'go' that I should be aware of?

Tks. again!

pauljcl

Your 99-00 RX transaxle will be under the most duress under the 3 conditions spelled out in the TSB issued in the summer of 2003 for the 2003 Camry.

The problem occurs anytime the transaxle has just previously upshifted and then for some reason you decide you want to accelerate. The transaxle must then quickly downshift into the proper gear ratio for acceleration, possibly even before the previously "commanded" upshift has completed. Due to an internal design change, abolition of the accumulator, the RX transaxle's gear type ATF pump "ALONE" (absent the accumulator "backup") CANNOT supply enough fluid pressure/flow, to support two gear changes in quick succession, especially if a FULL throttle lift resulting in the engine RPM dropping to idle, was the cause for the initial upshift.

A modification(***1) that might work would be to use the TPS, Throttle Position Sensor, signal to detect a QUICK, or SUBSTANTIAL throttle lift and then use a relay to energize the brake light circuit. The brake circuit would/should remain energized until pressure is re-applied to the gas pedal. Provide the driver with a manual over-ride switch to disable this function if the roadbed traction is questionable.

That would make it less likely, possibly a LOT less likely, that the transaxle would upshift, inadvertently upshift, when you lift the gas pedal. Absent the brake light signal the engine/transaxle ECU will ALWAYS(***2) assume that when you release foot pressure on the gas pedal your intent is to enter cruise "mode", upshift into a gear ratio more appropriate for the roadspeed/FE. With the brake light circuit energized your intent to "coastdown" to a lower speed is made most obvious.

The problem with the 99-00 RX series was overcome in the 01-03 RX series via increasing the base volume of the ATF pump. While that appeared to have alleviated the transaxle failures caused by the earlier 00-99 design change the increased pump volume seemingly resulted in the ATF being overheated resulting in the need for an ATF drain and refill every 15,000 miles vs NEVER. As everyone now knows the solution of the RX330 and 350 series has been to use DBW to prevent the engine from responding to the new gas pedal position until the "e.l..o...n....g.....a.......t........e..........d" downshift sequence can complete.

***1: Not a "West" original idea, simply a RIP-OFF, different implementation, "RETROFIT", of the newly adopted firmware method currently going through trials in certain '08 ('09..??) Toyoya and Lexus FWD and F/AWD models.

***2: Just as downshifting ANY FWD or F/AWD vehicle to attain a not insignificant level of engine compression braking on a questionable, possibly slippery, roadbed surface can be HAZARDOUS, so too would be leaving one of these automatic transaxle equipped vehicles in a "downshifted" mode upon throttle lift after a period of acceleration can potentually be HAZARDOUS.

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From what I've read, "there are an abnormally high number of RX300's in the 99/00 year range that has had transmission failures". The question is what this means. You've got to take into account the RX model is Lexus's highest selling model upon it's release (over 370,000 units in the RX300 model years). With that said, it could be only 1% failure rate, but that's still 3700 vehicles. I do know that many of the 99/00 RX's go well beyond 150K on the factory transmission.

If I were the owner of your vehicle, I would keep it, keep an eye on the transmission fluid color, do regular maintenance, keep an eye out for any signs of issues, and just enjoy the vehicle. If you treat it nicely and care for it, it should treat you nicely and be good to you.

Thanks much for your opinion. I think I will have the transmission oil monitored every oil change (5,000 miles), and see what happens. I am waiting for the 'newer' breed of cars to appear - smaller/ more FE SUVs (hybrid or electric or hydrogen of not) and will then change vehicle... Are there any 'driving' signs tha the transmission is beginning to 'go' that I should be aware of?

Tks. again!

pauljcl

Your 99-00 RX transaxle will be under the most duress under the 3 conditions spelled out in the TSB issued in the summer of 2003 for the 2003 Camry.

The problem occurs anytime the transaxle has just previously upshifted and then for some reason you decide you want to accelerate. The transaxle must then quickly downshift into the proper gear ratio for acceleration, possibly even before the previously "commanded" upshift has completed. Due to an internal design change, abolition of the accumulator, the RX transaxle's gear type ATF pump "ALONE" (absent the accumulator "backup") CANNOT supply enough fluid pressure/flow, to support two gear changes in quick succession, especially if a FULL throttle lift resulting in the engine RPM dropping to idle, was the cause for the initial upshift.

A modification(***1) that might work would be to use the TPS, Throttle Position Sensor, signal to detect a QUICK, or SUBSTANTIAL throttle lift and then use a relay to energize the brake light circuit. The brake circuit would/should remain energized until pressure is re-applied to the gas pedal. Provide the driver with a manual over-ride switch to disable this function if the roadbed traction is questionable.

That would make it less likely, possibly a LOT less likely, that the transaxle would upshift, inadvertently upshift, when you lift the gas pedal. Absent the brake light signal the engine/transaxle ECU will ALWAYS(***2) assume that when you release foot pressure on the gas pedal your intent is to enter cruise "mode", upshift into a gear ratio more appropriate for the roadspeed/FE. With the brake light circuit energized your intent to "coastdown" to a lower speed is made most obvious.

The problem with the 99-00 RX series was overcome in the 01-03 RX series via increasing the base volume of the ATF pump. While that appeared to have alleviated the transaxle failures caused by the earlier 00-99 design change the increased pump volume seemingly resulted in the ATF being overheated resulting in the need for an ATF drain and refill every 15,000 miles vs NEVER. As everyone now knows the solution of the RX330 and 350 series has been to use DBW to prevent the engine from responding to the new gas pedal position until the "e.l..o...n....g.....a.......t........e..........d" downshift sequence can complete.

***1: Not a "West" original idea, simply a RIP-OFF, different implementation, "RETROFIT", of the newly adopted firmware method currently going through trials in certain '08 ('09..??) Toyoya and Lexus FWD and F/AWD models.

***2: Just as downshifting ANY FWD or F/AWD vehicle to attain a not insignificant level of engine compression braking on a questionable, possibly slippery, roadbed surface can be HAZARDOUS, so too would be leaving one of these automatic transaxle equipped vehicles in a "downshifted" mode upon throttle lift after a period of acceleration can potentually be HAZARDOUS.

The 'duress' situations seem to be the ones where you feel that the transmission has 'got it wrong'. In fact, the 'upshift' on relaxing the gas pedal, followed by re-acceleration, leads to jerky shifts and 'mismatched' revs and a general feeling of confusion for the transmission. After an initial (disappointed) period of discovery of this problem - we took the car back to Lexus to ask whether there was a problem (also re: the 'no o/d' when cold and the very slight 'shudder' on acceleration) and were told that all was normal ("They all do that") - we drive the car very gently, even when going fast or quickly from one point to the other. As a matter of some interest, there are a few transmissions where the results are unhappy in certain situations - BMW M3 (older series) when you accelerate max. first gear then, immediately after the shift to second, let go the gas to let the car 'coast... you get multi-bucking even as you touch no foot pedal. The 330C I have is slow and uncomfortable in an downshift/upshift situation... takes forever. So, like one does with older friends, we accommodate their foibles and don't pressure them... Like old friends, we hope they will live long...

Thank you for the detailed posting!

pauljcl

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I have a 2002 Lexus RX300 AWD, and the dealer said when we bought it to get a vehicle diagnostic test to make sure that everything is well in order, and we did, everything checked out ok, but then he told us that we should watch out for the transmission, because it starts going at about 120,000 miles, but that is on either 2WD or 4WD.

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I have a 2002 Lexus RX300 AWD, and the dealer said when we bought it to get a vehicle diagnostic test to make sure that everything is well in order, and we did, everything checked out ok, but then he told us that we should watch out for the transmission, because it starts going at about 120,000 miles, but that is on either 2WD or 4WD.

Thank you, Zach. We'll cross fingers our transmission will last. Good luck with yours!

pauljcl

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There is a huge amount of posts on tranny problems, Please note maintenance, maintenance , maintenance, every 15k miles a fluid drain and fill may help....Just my two cents from one that has been there and most vocal about the failures...

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There is a huge amount of posts on tranny problems, Please note maintenance, maintenance , maintenance, every 15k miles a fluid drain and fill may help....Just my two cents from one that has been there and most vocal about the failures...

Personally I'm ignoring the 15k "rule" in favor of just watching out for a change in the ATF condition, appearance and odor/smell.

At only ~40,000 miles mine was dark and smelled burned.

I'm now at 70,000 miles and the ATF doesn't yet quite meet my drain and refill criteria.

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I have a 2001 RX300 with 128K miles. I am clueless when it comes to automobiles. I am experiencing an acceleration hesitation problem. It happened the first time when I had driven all day looking at real estate. I knew I was low on oil so I stopped, added a quart and the problem went away. Now two months and an oil/filter change later the problem has come back. When the car has been run for about an hour I experience a similar accleration hesitation problem decribed in this forum. No matter what speed I am going 0, 40 or 60 MPH when I accelerate over 2000 RPM I experience a loss of power/acceleration followed by a "sling-shot" move where the power comes back just to go back to sling-shot again. When I pull over and stop and start the car the problem goes away to return an hour later. Any advice?

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I have a 2001 RX300 with 128K miles. I am clueless when it comes to automobiles. I am experiencing an acceleration hesitation problem. It happened the first time when I had driven all day looking at real estate. I knew I was low on oil so I stopped, added a quart and the problem went away.

I like to think "this" recovery had more to do with the ignition off period than the low engine (??) oil.

Now two months and an oil/filter change later the problem has come back. When the car has been run for about an hour I experience a similar accleration hesitation problem decribed in this forum. No matter what speed I am going 0, 40 or 60 MPH when I accelerate over 2000 RPM I experience a loss of power/acceleration followed by a "sling-shot" move where the power comes back just to go back to sling-shot again. When I pull over and stop and start the car the problem goes away to return an hour later. Any advice?

Given the history, forum posting history, for the 2001 RX300 if mine had that kind of mileage I'd be overhauling the transaxle.

Have you checked the ATF fill level or condition..??

ATF should be mostly clear/transparent and light pink in color.

With the ignition switched on but no engine start make sure all the instrument panel diagnostic lights/icons illuminate.

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I have a 2001 RX300 with 128K miles. I am clueless when it comes to automobiles. I am experiencing an acceleration hesitation problem. It happened the first time when I had driven all day looking at real estate. I knew I was low on oil so I stopped, added a quart and the problem went away.

I like to think "this" recovery had more to do with the ignition off period than the low engine (??) oil.

Ya I figured that, but wanted to include all info.

Now two months and an oil/filter change later the problem has come back. When the car has been run for about an hour I experience a similar accleration hesitation problem decribed in this forum. No matter what speed I am going 0, 40 or 60 MPH when I accelerate over 2000 RPM I experience a loss of power/acceleration followed by a "sling-shot" move where the power comes back just to go back to sling-shot again. When I pull over and stop and start the car the problem goes away to return an hour later. Any advice?

Given the history, forum posting history, for the 2001 RX300 if mine had that kind of mileage I'd be overhauling the transaxle.

Have you checked the ATF fill level or condition..??

ATF should be mostly clear/transparent and light pink in color. ATF looks great and it is full. No traces of metallic fines or discoloration.

With the ignition switched on but no engine start make sure all the instrument panel diagnostic lights/icons illuminate. All warnings lights illuminate.

Is there anything to the recommendation of cleaning out the resistors down stream of the air filter?

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