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Preventive Maintenance Might Help


kimo
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We just bought a 2001 rx300 AWD, 72000 miles one owner car. The tranny was last serviced at 45000 miles. I was aware of the potential problems with these SUV'S, but decided it was a lot better riding vehicle than the Infinti's we were test driving.

I just want to send a thank you for this website and all the members who take time to post info that will help fellow Lexus owners. I just joined the club yesterday and have found so much information regarding maintenance etc.

Today I had the tranny flushed by a very good shop here in Santa Cruz CA, The DMV clinic on Soquel Dr.

I made sure that they used the Toyota t-1V fluid as mentioned here. They were smart enough to know that without me mentioning it.

One of the tech's I spoke with when I picked the car up today, said that it was a bit dirty and dark looking. A sign of the clutch bands wearing no doubt.

So I am hoping that we caught it soon enough to get as many miles as possible before it craps out on us , as many of my fellow owners have experienced. But if not, we still love the car and feel like we saved a bundle by buying a used one. Other than that, the car was serviced regularly by a local dealer and I will try to keep it up the best I can on my own.

Just need a service manual if anyone has the download I would sure appreciate it, Aloha....KIMO

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We just bought a 2001 rx300 AWD, 72000 miles one owner car. The tranny was last serviced at 45000 miles. I was aware of the potential problems with these SUV'S, but decided it was a lot better riding vehicle than the Infinti's we were test driving.

I just want to send a thank you for this website and all the members who take time to post info that will help fellow Lexus owners. I just joined the club yesterday and have found so much information regarding maintenance etc.

Today I had the tranny flushed by a very good shop here in Santa Cruz CA, The DMV clinic on Soquel Dr.

I made sure that they used the Toyota t-1V fluid as mentioned here. They were smart enough to know that without me mentioning it.

One of the tech's I spoke with when I picked the car up today, said that it was a bit dirty and dark looking. A sign of the clutch bands wearing no doubt.

So I am hoping that we caught it soon enough to get as many miles as possible before it craps out on us , as many of my fellow owners have experienced. But if not, we still love the car and feel like we saved a bundle by buying a used one. Other than that, the car was serviced regularly by a local dealer and I will try to keep it up the best I can on my own.

Just need a service manual if anyone has the download I would sure appreciate it, Aloha....KIMO

You can extend the life of your transaxle by doing the best you can to avoid the circumstancs spelled out in the Toyota TSB issued in the spring of 2003 pertaining to the 2003 Camry. It would also help that when those circumstances are unavoidable simply downshift manually simultaneously with lifting the gas pedal. Just remember, keep in mind, that downshifting a FWD vehicle on a slippery surface can be very hazardous.

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You can extend the life of your transaxle by doing the best you can to avoid the circumstancs spelled out in the Toyota TSB issued in the spring of 2003 pertaining to the 2003 Camry. It would also help that when those circumstances are unavoidable simply downshift manually simultaneously with lifting the gas pedal. Just remember, keep in mind, that downshifting a FWD vehicle on a slippery surface can be very hazardous.

Would you be so kind as to explain what those circumstances are? My 1999 is getting a new tranny as we speak (type?).

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i have not added a cooler , but did add an additional external fluid filter. my next move will be to move the tranny cooler in the wheel well to the front of the vehicle. When i do I will take pictures. Just need some time...

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You can extend the life of your transaxle by doing the best you can to avoid the circumstancs spelled out in the Toyota TSB issued in the spring of 2003 pertaining to the 2003 Camry. It would also help that when those circumstances are unavoidable simply downshift manually simultaneously with lifting the gas pedal. Just remember, keep in mind, that downshifting a FWD vehicle on a slippery surface can be very hazardous.

Would you be so kind as to explain what those circumstances are? My 1999 is getting a new tranny as we speak (type?).

I have instructed my wife to de select overdrive when in heavy commute slow traffic so that the tranny will not constantly search for the overdrive.... I too would be interested in that tsb.....

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You can extend the life of your transaxle by doing the best you can to avoid the circumstancs spelled out in the Toyota TSB issued in the spring of 2003 pertaining to the 2003 Camry. It would also help that when those circumstances are unavoidable simply downshift manually simultaneously with lifting the gas pedal. Just remember, keep in mind, that downshifting a FWD vehicle on a slippery surface can be very hazardous.

Would you be so kind as to explain what those circumstances are? My 1999 is getting a new tranny as we speak (type?).

I have instructed my wife to de select overdrive when in heavy commute slow traffic so that the tranny will not constantly search for the overdrive.... I too would be interested in that tsb.....

So what you guys are saying, is to downshift into 2nd gear when driving in stop and go traffic ???? thanks

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You can extend the life of your transaxle by doing the best you can to avoid the circumstancs spelled out in the Toyota TSB issued in the spring of 2003 pertaining to the 2003 Camry. It would also help that when those circumstances are unavoidable simply downshift manually simultaneously with lifting the gas pedal. Just remember, keep in mind, that downshifting a FWD vehicle on a slippery surface can be very hazardous.

Would you be so kind as to explain what those circumstances are? My 1999 is getting a new tranny as we speak (type?).

I have instructed my wife to de select overdrive when in heavy commute slow traffic so that the tranny will not constantly search for the overdrive.... I too would be interested in that tsb.....

So what you guys are saying, is to downshift into 2nd gear when driving in stop and go traffic ???? thanks

NO.

Downshift manually for full lift-throttle coastdown periods ONLY when you foresee, can predict, that a quick return to acceleration is or might be appropriate. At higher coastdown speeds shift down only to second, below ~10 MPH shift down to first...

In both cases the transaxle will not actually downshift until the vehicle roadbed has declined to the appropriate range "safe" for the selected gear ratio. But having "commanded" the downshift will prevent the transaxle from upshifting and thereby leaving you without "GO" should you soon have the need.

But I would advise being very carefull against using this technique during cold weather, any suspected slippery roadbed surface, as loss of directional control can very easily result from even a slight level of engine braking on a FWD vehicle. And keep in mind that engine compression braking can also prevent your anti-lock system from being fully operational on a slippery roadbed surface.

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So west de selecting the overdrive in communte traffic at least stops the tranny from constantly searching for overdrive below 40 mph... Do you agree? by the way I live in sunny california so no snow problems for traction...

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You can extend the life of your transaxle by doing the best you can to avoid the circumstancs spelled out in the Toyota TSB issued in the spring of 2003 pertaining to the 2003 Camry. It would also help that when those circumstances are unavoidable simply downshift manually simultaneously with lifting the gas pedal. Just remember, keep in mind, that downshifting a FWD vehicle on a slippery surface can be very hazardous.

Would you be so kind as to explain what those circumstances are? My 1999 is getting a new tranny as we speak (type?).

I have instructed my wife to de select overdrive when in heavy commute slow traffic so that the tranny will not constantly search for the overdrive.... I too would be interested in that tsb.....

So what you guys are saying, is to downshift into 2nd gear when driving in stop and go traffic ???? thanks

NO.

Downshift manually for full lift-throttle coastdown periods ONLY when you foresee, can predict, that a quick return to acceleration is or might be appropriate. At higher coastdown speeds shift down only to second, below ~10 MPH shift down to first...

In both cases the transaxle will not actually downshift until the vehicle roadbed has declined to the appropriate range "safe" for the selected gear ratio. But having "commanded" the downshift will prevent the transaxle from upshifting and thereby leaving you without "GO" should you soon have the need.

But I would advise being very carefull against using this technique during cold weather, any suspected slippery roadbed surface, as loss of directional control can very easily result from even a slight level of engine braking on a FWD vehicle. And keep in mind that engine compression braking can also prevent your anti-lock system from being fully operational on a slippery roadbed surface.

With what we paid for these cars, and the quality that Lexus talks about, does anyone else think that it's shame that this conversation has to go on.

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You can extend the life of your transaxle by doing the best you can to avoid the circumstancs spelled out in the Toyota TSB issued in the spring of 2003 pertaining to the 2003 Camry. It would also help that when those circumstances are unavoidable simply downshift manually simultaneously with lifting the gas pedal. Just remember, keep in mind, that downshifting a FWD vehicle on a slippery surface can be very hazardous.

Would you be so kind as to explain what those circumstances are? My 1999 is getting a new tranny as we speak (type?).

I have instructed my wife to de select overdrive when in heavy commute slow traffic so that the tranny will not constantly search for the overdrive.... I too would be interested in that tsb.....

So what you guys are saying, is to downshift into 2nd gear when driving in stop and go traffic ???? thanks

NO.

Downshift manually for full lift-throttle coastdown periods ONLY when you foresee, can predict, that a quick return to acceleration is or might be appropriate. At higher coastdown speeds shift down only to second, below ~10 MPH shift down to first...

In both cases the transaxle will not actually downshift until the vehicle roadbed has declined to the appropriate range "safe" for the selected gear ratio. But having "commanded" the downshift will prevent the transaxle from upshifting and thereby leaving you without "GO" should you soon have the need.

But I would advise being very carefull against using this technique during cold weather, any suspected slippery roadbed surface, as loss of directional control can very easily result from even a slight level of engine braking on a FWD vehicle. And keep in mind that engine compression braking can also prevent your anti-lock system from being fully operational on a slippery roadbed surface.

With what we paid for these cars, and the quality that Lexus talks about, does anyone else think that it's shame that this conversation has to go on.

No George it shouldnt have to even be a issue, but it is. I just hope to get a few years out of are rx300 before it needs a tranny. So the more I can learn to help it last , amen to that.

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So west de selecting the overdrive in communte traffic at least stops the tranny from constantly searching for overdrive below 40 mph... Do you agree? by the way I live in sunny california so no snow problems for traction...

I don't know of, haven't heard of, nor do I foresee any problems arising from the use of O/D in city commute traffic. The only time I worry about, disable O/D, is driving up a steep or long incline.

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