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Best Tires For My Rx400h When It Comes Time


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OK, so I don't know much about tires but I hear things about the Goodyear Eagle RS-A tires that came with my RX400h that sound as if they aren't the best. They are retailed at $187 each which sounds as if they are good, if you go by price,and that's all that I can go by right now. They seem really great up to this point. Anyway, I would appreciate more input please about what you might consider the smoothest riding tire. That's my primary concern. Secondarily handling and lifespan,even though I hope I don't have to compromise. Let me further state that I do live in SoCalifornia so weather is not an issue...I definitely am not going off roading with "Princess" and I drive only about 11K a year. I'd appreciate any input. I won't need to change the tries for a while, I have 12K on the car/tires at this point but I want to be prepared. Lexus man, Rey Bustos

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I'll probably buy another set of the Michelin Energy MXV4 S8 - very highly rated on all the tire websites.

Check out this site in your research ... Michelin's rated 8th - Alenzas #3 - we have nearly 7500 miles on the Alenza and are completely pleased. We have the Goodyear Tripletread on our Tacoma - noisier than the Alenza's but great traction wet - snow or rain.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/surveyresult...inSpeedRating=S

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Unfortunately, the top-rated Goodyear Tripletread is not available in our tire sizes. Still, the Bridgestones appear to be excellent tires. My set of four is still back-ordered after one month.

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I always buy tires for a particular vehicle, based on the type of vehicle. For the RX 400h I purchased the following tires based on...

a) Wear. I have read and spoken to owners who have complained of poor wear, as well as "under inflation" type wear. So the tires I chose have a wear rating 440. I didn't want something with the highest wear rating as the only or most important criteria.

B) Ride. I wanted a quiet riding tire with low in cabin noise. So the tire I chose had to have ride qualities high up on the list.

c) Choice. Unfortunately the 235/55-18 tire size leaves very little choice in the marketplace. From sources, you can plus zero your available tire size. So I plus zeroed my choice to 255/55-18 for the summer. Yes, I do have factory winter 235/55-18 on factory wheels. The plus zero size really opens up your available choices. I did take into consideration the the slightly taller tire as well as the additional 20mm width. To me, this is not a tradeoff, but all benefit.

d) Overall. Traction in Wet, Dry, Cornering, and out on the open road were all part of my choice as well. As well as new tire technology. I can't wait to get back with my feedback in a couple of months.

Goodyear Eagle ResponsEdge - Grand Touring All-Season tires

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?ti...es&place=18

That's my choice.

Cheers,

MadloR

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Thanks to all again! Great info. I'm leaning towards Bridgestone Alenza...but, as I said, I have a lot more driving to do and more places to visit and tread to wear before that happens. Rey

I always buy tires for a particular vehicle, based on the type of vehicle. For the RX 400h I purchased the following tires based on...

a) Wear. I have read and spoken to owners who have complained of poor wear, as well as "under inflation" type wear. So the tires I chose have a wear rating 440. I didn't want something with the highest wear rating as the only or most important criteria.

B) Ride. I wanted a quiet riding tire with low in cabin noise. So the tire I chose had to have ride qualities high up on the list.

c) Choice. Unfortunately the 235/55-18 tire size leaves very little choice in the marketplace. From sources, you can plus zero your available tire size. So I plus zeroed my choice to 255/55-18 for the summer. Yes, I do have factory winter 235/55-18 on factory wheels. The plus zero size really opens up your available choices. I did take into consideration the the slightly taller tire as well as the additional 20mm width. To me, this is not a tradeoff, but all benefit.

d) Overall. Traction in Wet, Dry, Cornering, and out on the open road were all part of my choice as well. As well as new tire technology. I can't wait to get back with my feedback in a couple of months.

Goodyear Eagle ResponsEdge - Grand Touring All-Season tires

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?ti...es&place=18

That's my choice.

Cheers,

MadloR

Very good info, thanks. So the 255 number makes the tire wider on the side? Does it look different than the 235? Or is it too small of a difference. I'm putting 35 PSI in my Eagles, when I have it at the recommended lower PSI the tires seem low. Rey

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I have not installed the GoodYear Responsedge on the vehicle yet. I purchased the vehicle in January and took delivery in February. I have in my Garage the Responsedge and side by side, next to the Bridgestone Blizzaks (factory side) they are obviously wider. Not enormously wider, but a little similar in look when you notice a Mercedes ML350 vs an ML500. This vehicle is a real "porker" on the weight scale. I do believe given the girth of this vehicle that the additional 20 mm will really help out with tire wear and performance over the life of the tire.

When I get a chance, I will see if I can get some photos uploaded.

Cheers,

MadloR

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Keep in mind that

1) Tire wear numbers are good to know only if comparing tires from the same manufacturer

2) Larger diameter tires will affect your displayed speed so that it is below the actual vehicle speed.

3) Wider tires may decrease fuel mileage and may not provide more contact area, depending upon the wheel width.

4) Larger diameter tires may rub against suspension components when the vehicle's steering wheel is near full-lock.

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Keep in mind that

1) Tire wear numbers are good to know only if comparing tires from the same manufacturer

2) Larger diameter tires will affect your displayed speed so that it is below the actual vehicle speed.

3) Wider tires may decrease fuel mileage and may not provide more contact area, depending upon the wheel width.

4) Larger diameter tires may rub against suspension components when the vehicle's steering wheel is near full-lock.

5) Larger diameter tires may interfere with the use of chains as well

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The plus zero options (same rim dia = 18 in) are:

235/60R18

which have a longer rolling distance (Speedo reads 65, you are going 67)

and add .46 in to the ride height

while keeping the same tread width

Given the small amount of clearance between the tire tread and the rear strut assy (~.5 in) ... this tire will not fit on the 400h

255/55R18

which have a longer rolling distance (Speedo reads 65, you are going 67)

and add .43 in to the ride height

while adding .8 in to the tread width

Also do not feel this tire will fit onto the 400h for the same reason as above, plus you are adding width as well which can only make things worse.

If you want to change tire size, consider these things carefully.

You can check out these numbers and other geometries for larger rims at this handy calculator

http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/infoTireMath.dos

Personally, I'm going to stick to the factory size unless I get new rims and the best tires available for that size are the Michlien MXV4 S8 or the Bridgstone Alenza, both of which are cheaper than the Goodyear Eagle RS-A. There are also a couple of Yokohamma models at opposite ends of the prices spectrum (which should be telling you something about the cheap one)

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The plus zero options (same rim dia = 18 in) are:

235/60R18

which have a longer rolling distance (Speedo reads 65, you are going 67)

and add .46 in to the ride height

while keeping the same tread width

Given the small amount of clearance between the tire tread and the rear strut assy (~.5 in) ... this tire will not fit on the 400h

255/55R18

which have a longer rolling distance (Speedo reads 65, you are going 67)

and add .43 in to the ride height

while adding .8 in to the tread width

Also do not feel this tire will fit onto the 400h for the same reason as above, plus you are adding width as well which can only make things worse.

If you want to change tire size, consider these things carefully.

You can check out these numbers and other geometries for larger rims at this handy calculator

http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/infoTireMath.dos

Personally, I'm going to stick to the factory size unless I get new rims and the best tires available for that size are the Michlien MXV4 S8 or the Bridgstone Alenza, both of which are cheaper than the Goodyear Eagle RS-A. There are also a couple of Yokohamma models at opposite ends of the prices spectrum (which should be telling you something about the cheap one)

http://www.discounttiredirect.com/direct/a...&vid=009776

Available tires for the 2006 RX 400H according to Discount Tire...

Cheers,

MadloR

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  • 2 weeks later...

My GoodYear RS-A tires have a little over 12K on them and two are wearing down on the inside really badly. Is it the car or the tires that are awry? I am going to get Bridgestone Alenzas by the end of '07. This is ridiculous! I was putting on my mud guards when I noticed and I had been reading from some of you about tires and now I can see why it seems as if anyone with the "Bad Year" RS-A tires bail and look for a better product! Ayayayaee! Rey in L.A.

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My GoodYear RS-A tires have a little over 12K on them and two are wearing down on the inside really badly. Is it the car or the tires that are awry? I am going to get Bridgestone Alenzas by the end of '07. This is ridiculous! I was putting on my mud guards when I noticed and I had been reading from some of you about tires and now I can see why it seems as if anyone with the "Bad Year" RS-A tires bail and look for a better product! Ayayayaee! Rey in L.A.

What pressure are you running?

I've been running at the dealer set 32 psi and mine are wearing out on the outsides first. More so on the left side of the car than on the right side... I guess that could be my fault ;)

But I've since started running them at 46 psi and the edges dont even make contact with the road when I'm just rolling. MPG went up by 3 when I made that one change. Handels better too.

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46psi is too high imho. Also, if you are going to run maximum inflation rates based on what the sidewall of the tire is listed for, take note that Cold tire pressure @ 46psi will definitely approach or surpass 50psi depending on outside temperatures. I'm sure most tires can handle 50psi ratings given the abuse of everyday roads, just consider it just the same. The tire manufacture went to the trouble of R & D and had that printed on the side of the tire just the same.

Cheers,

MadloR

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I changed from 32psi which is what the delership had them at, to 34 and may go to 36. I've only been at 34psi for a month so maybe the pressure was too low before? I love the feel and even just a couple of PSIs more has felt differently as far as the ride is concerned. The insides are really worn as if I had the car years. I've only had it 13 months, 1-3-06 to now, 2-24-07 and I am surprised at how thrashed two,on opposite corners,are wearing on the inside. They are almost bare. I'll have to try to get the Bridgestone Alenzas that I keep hearing so many great things about. They are rated #3 with a bullet on Tirerack...must be good. I had Michelin's in the past, on other cars, but I think they are too pricey for what they are, I wasn't too impressed. I'd like to try Bridgstone Alenzas. They are highly rated and much less expensive than the Michelins...no offense for those that like Michelins, there are many types of Michelins. The Bridgestones and the Michelins have to be better than the GoodYears that came with my RX400h! I could make better tires in a high school shop class. happy trails, Rey

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I believe 34-37 psi is optimal, although since the outsides of my tires are all worn out (at 18,000 miles), I've boosted the pressure to 40 until I get the Bridgestones. I called the Tirerack yesterday and they told me that my tires will be in next week. I've been waiting for almost two months now. $150 each is a great price, IMO.

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Yes, I am getting the Alenzas (stock - 235/55/18 size). Apparently, the larger tires do fit, according to another member. The only advantage I can see with getting tires of that size is that there are more choices of tire manufacturers. However, since the Bridgestones are both rated highly and sell for a very decent price, I went with them to replace my OEM Goodyears.

Dave

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46psi is too high imho. Also, if you are going to run maximum inflation rates based on what the sidewall of the tire is listed for, take note that Cold tire pressure @ 46psi will definitely approach or surpass 50psi depending on outside temperatures. I'm sure most tires can handle 50psi ratings given the abuse of everyday roads, just consider it just the same. The tire manufacture went to the trouble of R & D and had that printed on the side of the tire just the same.

I'm only running 46 psi until I get new tires in an attempt to compensate for all the wear they have suffered while running at only 32 psi for 20K mi.

But I wanted to clarify one important point that I see over and over.

The MAX tire pressure of 46 psi is COLD. All tire pressures are stated in terms of COLD. That means the tire mfg has already taken into account the increase in pressure once the tires warm up.

One should always (and only) set their tire pressure when COLD. That means STD day condtions of 70 F, not whatever temperature it happens to be outside. Now, personally, if the air is within +/- 20 F of 70, then I would not be too concerned, but if its 100 F or near freezing then that could affect your COLD pressure by a couple of psi one way or the other.

The point is when the tires have been run they could be at any temperature between slightly warmer than ambiant to 150 F so you can not use the COLD pressure value when inflating a tire in that condition.

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A point I brought up in the past concerning why I opted for 255/55-18 was I believe this vehicle is seriously "tire undersized". I can understand Lexus engineers point of view on why they opted for 235/55/18 but from real world numbers (be it michelin or goodyears) the RX 400H seems to chew the outer insides of the tires.

I look forward to spring when I swap out my winter package (235/55-18 Blizzaks) for the GoodYear ResponsEdge.

Cheers,

MadloR

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