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Switching To Synthetic....


1995_ES300
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I tried using the search button to figure out about my dillemma...but came up with nothing unless I was typing the wrong info in. I would like to know what the steps are to switch over to a synthetic oil from a conventional oil. I thought I overheard something along the lines of letting the synthetic to drain through as you pour it in a few times? Or do you just directly add the synthetic after using a crankcase cleaner? Also....is a special oil filter needed for synthetic oil use? Ive used conventional oil for all my vehicles, but I have seen the benefits of using synthetic and would like to switch over after recieving my first lexus. thanks :)

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You've seen cosmetic benefits from using synthetic - less varnish deposits inside the engine - but these deposits aren't harmful, just cosmetic.

You've also seen some oil analysis test score benefits.

But you've never seen any real world proof that synthetics extend engine life significantly in Asian car engines. That's because synthetics don't. And one reason tha Asian car makers don't recommend synthetic. To keep you from ever figuring this out, synthetic oil salesmen will always dodge this "real world proof" issue and divert the conversation over to the cosmetic benefits, oil test benefits, etc.

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I currently have Mobil 1 5W30 synthetic in my 01 ES, but will be switching to Amsoil 5W30 (ASL) synthetic. It protects better overall in every category over Mobil 1. Here is one example of that proof.......although some with argue it's biased because the tests were conducted by Amsoil itself. One might want to remember that if the claims that Amsoil made, are false, they could be sued huge! :blink: :whistles:

http://www.amsoil.com/performancetests/amsoil_vs_mobil1.aspx

:cheers:

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the only reason i use synthetic is simply because it says more liquid than conventional at the prolonged drastically cold temperatures I endure in the winter in New England. This does yield less damage on the internals from some of the friction wear that is obtained regardless of the oil upon cold startups.

as for you initial question.

1. drain warm old oil, remove filter.

2. install new filter

3. fill with the require volume of synthetic oil.

4. repeat procedure in 5000 miles or whatever makes you happy and comfortable.

steviej

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  • 2 months later...
thanks everyone!

IF you REALLY want a definite answer. Get your oil analyzed. My stock change interval is 7500 miles. Oil spectrographic analysis tell me I COULD go more than 10K. that conclusion took many trials. I use Mobil 1 (red cap) or Amsoil. Oil testing runs about $40. Compare a 7K-10K cost for synthetic and a 3K change interval for dino oil.

Also the oil analysis can tell you about othere stuff, like leaky head gaskets,leaky fuel pumps, misfiring plugs etc.

:huh:

The performance of synthetics at temperature extremes is unrivaled.

Regards

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thanks everyone!

IF you REALLY want a definite answer. Get your oil analyzed. My stock change interval is 7500 miles. Oil spectrographic analysis tell me I COULD go more than 10K. that conclusion took many trials. I use Mobil 1 (red cap) or Amsoil. Oil testing runs about $40. Compare a 7K-10K cost for synthetic and a 3K change interval for dino oil.

Also the oil analysis can tell you about othere stuff, like leaky head gaskets,leaky fuel pumps, misfiring plugs etc.

:huh:

The performance of synthetics at temperature extremes is unrivaled.

Regards

True, I've personally noticed about a 2-3% increase in my fuel economy since switching to Amsoil over the Mobil 1. May not sound like much, but it does add up. ;) B)

:cheers:

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I would do the following and I have done this on my own cars. Also I assume (I know bad) you mean a real synthetic and not a group 3 (hydrocracked dino oil)?

1. I do not use any cleaner additives or bottles. I let the oil do the cleaning.

2. I fill with oil and then drain at short interval (ei. 5K miles). I personally use the interval used in my manual as short but that is me.

3. Drain oil after the short one and then re-fill (with filter) and then go to where you want to be. For me that is around 12 to 15K in my ES.

4. That is it. Drive and had fun

There is not special filter for synthetic unless you want to go longer on intervals. In this case, use what the oil manufacture tells you do use.

I personally test my oils on all my autos since 1996 and well, the tests are a very nice feature on how the oil is doing; but the main reason is to prevent downtime. To see how the engine is doing, not the oil.

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  • 9 months later...

Used to work for a chemical company that sold additives to virtually all the oil companies. They had a room with 12-15 engines running on steel mounts 24 hours a day doing nothing but testing oil. The synthetics outperformed conventional oil at every test. The difference in heat protection was very evident to the naked eye. Valve and valve stem bluing from heat and cylinder wall scoring were negligable with the synthetics. They just don't break down.

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Used to work for a chemical company that sold additives to virtually all the oil companies. They had a room with 12-15 engines running on steel mounts 24 hours a day doing nothing but testing oil. The synthetics outperformed conventional oil at every test. The difference in heat protection was very evident to the naked eye. Valve and valve stem bluing from heat and cylinder wall scoring were negligable with the synthetics. They just don't break down.

In the real world, properly driven and maintained Toyota engines don't suffer from "valve and valve stem bluing from heat and cylinder wall scoring" and will still be running great when they have 400,000 miles on them regardless if the owner used synthetic or conventional oil (and changed it at least every 6 months or 5,000 miles).

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In the real world, properly driven and maintained Toyota engines don't suffer from "valve and valve stem bluing from heat and cylinder wall scoring" and will still be running great when they have 400,000 miles on them regardless if the owner used synthetic or conventional oil (and changed it at least every 6 months or 5,000 miles).

Hmm, Why do I disagree with this???. I wonder why Toyota went from 7,500 miles drains to 5,000 drains in there Es300????? And re-designed there engine a little since there sludge issues? Plus you WILL have more deposits and varnish when using dino. Not re-inventing the wheel here, it is a lower quality oil.

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Hmm, Why do I disagree with this???. I wonder why Toyota went from 7,500 miles drains to 5,000 drains in there Es300????? And re-designed there engine a little since there sludge issues? Plus you WILL have more deposits and varnish when using dino. Not re-inventing the wheel here, it is a lower quality oil.

Late models Toyotas/ Lexus's can go the distance too. Here's a '99 Camry owner with 320,000 miles and still running like a top

http://www.saber.net/~monarch/320.jpg All major oil company dino oils have additives that protect against harmful engine deposits. Light varnish deposits do no harm - they're just cosmetic.

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Late models Toyotas/ Lexus's can go the distance too. Here's a '99 Camry owner with 320,000 miles and still running like a top

http://www.saber.net/~monarch/320.jpg All major oil company dino oils have additives that protect against harmful engine deposits. Light varnish deposits do no harm - they're just cosmetic.

I never saw a pix of there valve cover or valves to see the carbon or varnish. Plus I never stated it (varnish) is a problem but you WILL have more with dino; It is a FACT here. It is the nature of cheap dino oil. Not going into it but do somehome work on oils and then post back. It is not apples to apples.

So that is 1 person with 320K miles...and that means? What is the car history, location, driving habbits, fluid, person driving (age) etc????? Showing a screen capture means ZERO.

Feel free to take this offline of on bob is the oil guy. I will be more then happy to talk about it.

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Late models Toyotas/ Lexus's can go the distance too. Here's a '99 Camry owner with 320,000 miles and still running like a top

http://www.saber.net/~monarch/320.jpg All major oil company dino oils have additives that protect against harmful engine deposits. Light varnish deposits do no harm - they're just cosmetic.

I never saw a pix of there valve cover or valves to see the carbon or varnish. Plus I never stated it (varnish) is a problem but you WILL have more with dino; It is a FACT here. It is the nature of cheap dino oil. Not going into it but do somehome work on oils and then post back. It is not apples to apples.

So that is 1 person with 320K miles...and that means? What is the car history, location, driving habbits, fluid, person driving (age) etc????? Showing a screen capture means ZERO.

Feel free to take this offline of on bob is the oil guy. I will be more then happy to talk about it.

Boy I'd like to be a fly on the wall for that conversation! :whistles: ;) :lol:

:cheers:

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