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Removing Front Rotors On '94 Ls


TexasLexus94
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I bought new front rotors, and am stumped how to remove the old rotor. I removed the caliper and pads easily, but the caliper framework won't budge. I'm assuming the 2 large bolts on the inside of the framework should be removed, but they won't move, even with a breaker bar.

If there's an instruction for this work, I'd appreciate looking at it. My back would appreciate it, too. Thanks.

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u said

stumped how to remove the old rotor
so thats what im guessing is stuck. just the rotor.

-but then u said-

I removed the caliper and pads easily, but the caliper framework won't budge

if you removed the caliper easily, how is the frame work still stuck if u just removed it?

Also, what bolts where? please be more specific.

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Hi,

1. Jack up car (taking precautions of blocking all the wheels and using jack stands)

2. Get wheel off

3. Get brake caliper off (by undoing 2 bolts)

4. Get pads out

5. Get caliper brackets off (may be tough here; the bolts are larger than the caliper bolts)

6. Using crowbar (against the hole where the caliper bracket bolt screws into) and lots of wd40, get the darn rotor off: so rusty around the rims where connected to hub. And what amazing change in the ride and brake the new rotors made.

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  • 3 years later...
6. Using crowbar (against the hole where the caliper bracket bolt screws into) and lots of wd40, get the darn rotor off: so rusty around the rims where connected to hub.

I've tried what seems like everything to get the driver's side front rotor off my 91LS. I've removed the caliper, the pads, the caliper bracket, and the two little screws. While the passenger side came off with just a little persuasion, the driver side will not budge. Remembering this issue on another LS, I even tried threading the bolts that hold the caliper to the caliper bracket into the threaded holes in the rotor that are intended to allow you to force the rotor off that way. Trouble is, as the tips of those bolts are not threaded for the last 1/4" or so, you've only got 50% of the threads working in your favor. Yep, you guessed it, I stripped the threads on one of the holes.

Other things I had tried before stripping the threads:

1. Hitting the edges of the rotor with a small sledge.

2. Hitting the face (ack!) of the inside edge of the rotor with the sledge, rotating the rotor as I went.

3. Using an 18" or so prybar against the ears that hold the caliper bracket on. The prybar just bends (and bends back when I release the pressure.

4. Using a 3' section of 3/4" galvanized water pipe as a prybar against the ears that hold the caliper bracket on. The water pipe just bent (and stayed that way).

5. Spraying a rust penetrant (PB blaster or something like it) everywhere I could get to (between the studs and the rotor, into the threaded holes on the face of the rotor, etc.

Current plans are to swing by a hardware store tomorrow and pick up some grade 8 bolts that are threaded to the tip and see if I have any luck that way. Other ideas?

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Your on the right track for getting the rotors off, if the caliper mounting frame bolts are being stubborn and your rust pen wont work, then you can heat them up with a torch, and sometimes that helps loosen them up (be careful and make sure no rust pen is on them if you do. that stuff really is flamable, seen new tech or two light cars on fire that way). ive had to do it to a few brake jobs when im at work. as for the rotor, if you have new ones, then dont waste time, take an airhammer to the backside of it, or just go to town on it with the biggest sledge hammer in your box. your just going to throw them away anyways, the dont have to be pretty for the trashcan.

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6. Using crowbar (against the hole where the caliper bracket bolt screws into) and lots of wd40, get the darn rotor off: so rusty around the rims where connected to hub.

I've tried what seems like everything to get the driver's side front rotor off my 91LS.

Current plans are to swing by a hardware store tomorrow and pick up some grade 8 bolts that are threaded to the tip and see if I have any luck that way. Other ideas?

Yup, its obvious that you have been trying hard. Is the main hub of the rotor rusty as hell? While you are away at the store liberally apply penetrating oil (WD40) or diesel, should get in there given some time. If the corrsion has bonded the rotor on then they can be tough to get off, keep doing what you are as you will win.

As a last resort I have been known to use those little propane plumbers torches and put a little heat in (it is a brake rotor after all, and they do get hot, so it won't hurt it) to persuade any resistant parts to let go. Have an extinguiser handy if the thing is coated in oil though.

Good luck.

EDIT: Hahaha snap 4.0LS, you beat me to it!

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Yeah, I should've added the 'heat it up' option to my list of things I've tried, though have to admit I was being pretty timid about it. Of course, getting something the mass of a rotor very very hot is a bit of work for a little propane or mapp gas torch. I had wanted to heat the hub part of the rotor but was concerned about negatively impacting the hardness of the studs, so was heating the face of the rotor in a weak attempt to get the heat to migrate over to the hub part.

The airhammer trick is really a great idea, I'll give that a whirl.

The trouble is that this is a rotor that was under a lifetime warranty. I had visions of grandeur of taking it in to the local O'Reilly's and have them give me a new one for free (for some bizarre reason, the rotor did not wear evenly. Rather, a spot halfway through the wear pattern area on the inside has a ridge in it sticking up higher than the rest of the wear face.).

I've seen it where I had a divot in a wear pattern caused by a pebble or something getting caught up in there, but never the opposite.

Perhaps to 'save' the rotor, I'll clamp a shot brake pad to the rotor and air hammer that. Thanks for the ideas!

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I finally got the rotor off.

After it sat overnight with penetrating fluid sprayed from every angle I could think of, I was able to pound it off using the original grab a sledge technique. Thankfully, despite the pitting caused by the trauma, o'Reilly's gave me a new set of rotors (Wagners) under warranty along with new warranteed ceramic pads. Calipers (which were reasonably responsible for all of the damage from day one) are being ordered (also under warranty) and should come in and be installed tomorrow.

Total brake job cost was about $3 for new fluid.:cheers:

Question: is there any reason to NOT put a THIN layer of synthetic brake caliper grease on the inside hub area of the new rotors prior to assembly to prevent the rusting of the hub to the rotor in the future?

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I finally got the rotor off.

After it sat overnight with penetrating fluid sprayed from every angle I could think of, I was able to pound it off using the original grab a sledge technique. Thankfully, despite the pitting caused by the trauma, o'Reilly's gave me a new set of rotors (Wagners) under warranty along with new warranteed ceramic pads. Calipers (which were reasonably responsible for all of the damage from day one) are being ordered (also under warranty) and should come in and be installed tomorrow.

Total brake job cost was about $3 for new fluid.:cheers:

Question: is there any reason to NOT put a THIN layer of synthetic brake caliper grease on the inside hub area of the new rotors prior to assembly to prevent the rusting of the hub to the rotor in the future?

Use antiseize product :cheers: Spread it thin, Sure to win................

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The passenger side was sticking. Nothing wrong with the driver side that I know of, other than the fact that the rotor had that wear line (or lack thereof) in the middle. I picked up the replacement calipers today - time to go get everything installed.

Thanks for the help guys! I'll see if I have some anti-sieze compound in the garage. If not, any reason why I shouldn't use the synthetic grease that I know that I do have?

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The passenger side was sticking. Nothing wrong with the driver side that I know of, other than the fact that the rotor had that wear line (or lack thereof) in the middle. I picked up the replacement calipers today - time to go get everything installed.

Thanks for the help guys! I'll see if I have some anti-sieze compound in the garage. If not, any reason why I shouldn't use the synthetic grease that I know that I do have?

If there is no risk of grease slinging, I'd say no worries, esp if it is high-temp synth grease.

Curious--did you go with new OEM caliper or reman?

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