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Brakes And Roters


mikeohio
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I have a certified 2000 rx300. It was bought with 37,000 miles and the brakes were replaced and the rotors turned. 20,000 miles later I being told i need new rear rotors due to rust, and the brakes only have 30% left. Any suggestions?

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Believeable. Brakes on Lexus vehicles don't last long because they use a soft pad compound for quietness. Rotors are so cheap nowadays that most people don't turn them. Turning them makes them thinner which creates more heat and wears the pads faster. All Lexus dealers replace rotors now.

Odd the rears would go first though...

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SWO3 - what should someone expect to pay for new rotors? and brakes? Would you recommend Toyota brand, or could you get something comparable for less. I've never changed the brakes on my RX 300, nor the rotors, although I've had my RX for a short time. What type of warning might I expect when brakes are wearing down?

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Lexus/Toyota pads are softer but easier on the rotors. If anyone's front/rear pads can last for 50,000 miles, why look for aftermarket? Normally, the rotors should last 2-3 sets of pads. If you do any tire jobs anywhere, make sure they do not over tighten the lug nuts (76 lbs. according to owner's manual). Over tighten or unevenly tightened lug nuts are the main reasons for rotor premature failure. If you live in New England area, of course you'll power wash the car/the brake a few times in the winter to prevent rust. By the way, the rear brake lower caliper slides tend to seize over time.

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  • 3 months later...
Lexus/Toyota pads are softer but easier on the rotors.  If anyone's front/rear pads can last for 50,000 miles, why look for aftermarket?  Normally, the rotors should last 2-3 sets of pads.  If you do any tire jobs anywhere, make sure they do not over tighten the lug nuts (76 lbs. according to owner's manual).  Over tighten or unevenly tightened lug nuts are the main reasons for rotor premature failure.  If you live in New England area, of course you'll power wash the car/the brake a few times in the winter to prevent rust.  By the way, the rear brake lower caliper slides tend to seize over time.

Hey tta300 (or anyone else who can help),

I have an RX300 with 60K on it and was told by Lexus dealership that they rotors need to be turned and front brake pads need replacement. They were very insistent in saying that the rotors DO NOT need replacement, just to be turned. Total price: $260

I called a local mechanic who has a great reputation around here and he recommended replacing the rotors. His view is that turning them will only be good for 6 months to a year and then they could need turning/replacing. He recommends to replace the front brake pads and rotors.

Total Price: $410

What do you think, is it worth the extra $150?

Thanks everyone

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Brake rotors have a minimum thickness spec. This is ususally stamped somewhere thereon. My 35 year old Buick's rotors have over 300,000 miles on them and they are at the min thickness now. I put crappy pads on them last time just so I could squeak out another 30,000 miles. I did not turn the rotors because my dial indicator told me they were still parallel. At a 1000 miles per year I might replace them when the car hits 60 years old.

If your rotors can be turned and still meet the min thickness, I say save your money.

By the way, Japanese cars are some the easiest ever made for DIY brake jobs. If they are easy for the do it yourselfer, how much profit do you think a shop will take from your wallet? :pirate:

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I will be doing the front pads myself soon. What socket/torx is needed to remove the calipers?

Thanks.

By the way, Japanese cars are some the easiest ever made for DIY brake jobs. If they are easy for the do it yourselfer, how much profit do you think a shop will take from your wallet? :pirate:

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Hi Punkyrules,

If you are not a DIY guy, you might as well go to Toyota dealer to get second opinion and a quote. It's hard to believe Lexus dealer will turn your rotors. They simply replace them when they are warped. You'll know when you feel the vibration while braking. Good luck!

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I agree with BadBrad that rotors do not have to be turned or replaced unless they have worn thin beyond the factory minimum thickness spec. (which is measured with a micrometer) or if they are warped from improper use of the brakes or overtightening of the wheel lug nuts. I also agree Toyota / Lexus rotors last for 2-3 pad changes IF OEM pads are used at replacement time. Aftermarket pads can wear down the rotor more quickly.

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Brakes and tires are the two most variable components from vehicle-to-vehicle and driver-to-driver. If you drive hard, brake heavily and often, and drive mostly in town, you'll wear out your brakes very quickly. If you drive gently, coast before braking which allows the gears to help slow you down, and drive mostly on the highway, your original brakes may last 100,000 miles or more.

My wife drives carefully and rationally. As a result I'll be replacing the brake pads (both axles) on her 2000 RX300 at about 80,000 miles, probably before the pads even begin to chirp. There should be no need to turn the rotors at that time.

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