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Lexus_DK

Serpentine Belt Tensioner Pulley Bearing

13 posts in this topic

So my buddy has a 2007 Rx350 and has been experiencing a high pitch noise in the engine bay. After diagnosing it, turns out it was the belt tensioner pulley. After going to Advance auto, Autozone, oreillys, lexus dealership and Toyota dealerships; turns out they don't sell the tensioner pulley itself but only the whole Tensioner assembly. But the messed up part is, they can sell the idler pulleys. I'm pretty sure this topic has been covered before. However after taking the tensioner pulley off, I figured you can replace just the bearing inside the pulley and save money. So I go and start pressing the bearing out. Measured it and tried cross referencing it with an aftermarket bearing. The OEM bearing is made by NSK Japan, part number #6203DUL1B. Now, you can not buy it from NSK because they don't sell these bearings to the public. I tried calling NAPA Auto, WorldPac, and IMC auto parts warehouse. No luck. But researched and found a company called SFK makes one similar to the dimensions as to the NSK bearing, SKF Part No. #6203-2RS-JEM

There are several websites selling these SKF bearings online or even on eBay. You want to buy 2 bearings because there are two inside the pulley held together by a metal sleeve/bushing.

I'm waiting on the bearings to come in so I can press them back into the pulley casing. Here is where I'm at at the moment:

FE3CC2ED-0157-4DC2-A0B6-6659BCDF1FC8_zps

E53E9FC5-E620-45A6-95A6-66442BAA6585_zps

8B64E32D-61CE-4B7E-A646-B97C3705DE24_zps

85BECD70-20C3-452D-B81E-586FB4D1FFC3_zps

FEF2C279-15E8-4265-8188-D8E8639163D8_zps

1B13725E-77C7-45BC-9F36-7440F28181D0_zps

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I advise NOT to use a hammer to remove nor install the bearings in. Use a shop press or a bearing press kit. If you are creative, you can come up with your own press kit with various washer, a long bolt, nut and some spacers. Use some long handle ratchets and/or wrenches. It makes it easier and ensures a proper press out and in of the bearing. Here's what I used:

629CC465-00C4-4E79-9A76-FC33A380258D_zps

51FFBB60-467E-4790-9A63-1AA230ACDCBC_zps

F6416B92-EA05-45A2-B673-4B231168FD02_zps

FC069CED-824C-4B09-ACBD-32EE6BE9EEEA_zps

F4B42278-B636-4C37-8012-5A295180D884_zps

A2103021-B57F-48F6-87B8-0D6FF3005052_zps

2C05BE98-241A-49F5-966B-C12B43F5A248_zps

196E1024-5F53-47E4-B12A-C50C04F25E47_zps

3E385D6D-51EC-4762-8A6B-ADC3A0F32B0D_zps

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I know this is going to be taken as shade tree, but I have popped the rubber seal off those bearings on many pulleys and regreased the bearing with a high temp grease and ran them for fine.  Did this years ago on a motorhome, and recently on my neighbors Dodge Ram truck.  The key is using a high quality, high temp (synthetic) grease. Then pop seal back on.

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12 hours ago, lenore said:

I know this is going to be taken as shade tree, but I have popped the rubber seal off those bearings on many pulleys and regreased the bearing with a high temp grease and ran them for fine.  Did this years ago on a motorhome, and recently on my neighbors Dodge Ram truck.  The key is using a high quality, high temp (synthetic) grease. Then pop seal back on.

I thought about doing that. But at this point I didn't want to take the chance of having to replace the bearing later down the road.

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Today I used the shop press to extract the bushing/sleeve holding the two bearings together. You will need this sleeve for the new bearings. Here are some pictures of my setup, I forgot to take pictures of it on the shop press. I used a 30mm and a long 10mm impact socket. But you get the idea:

7BD811D0-7B71-45E1-B4B6-24C516DA999F_zps

A8512A0C-A4E4-42E2-937F-7381B544BC61_zps

343A1796-725E-4C7E-9750-5E27D6620590_zps

And then once youve pressed the inner sleeve all the way through:

E1B07F0D-9468-407B-AC2B-126300342FE1_zps

6198EAE3-9AA9-4F03-8E7A-E16BBC9C5BC2_zps

79EBD18E-ACF4-41C7-B0B6-869D2E63E0B8_zps

C0577A76-B2CB-4C09-8BC1-FDC859C4AB79_zps

 

Heres the two bearings separated:

A7B73103-866D-40AB-9A4E-98800069009D_zps

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I understand.  Note when I do this process, if the bearing is still noisy or has lateral movement, I replace it.  At my former Company (since retired) I used this process and implemented it and saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in my service industry.  I have found that many manufacturers used little or poor quality grease in the bearings causing premature failure.  I generally have not experienced this with Japanese made bearings.

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I have a shop press, the one thing important in pressing out a bearing or inserting is to only apply pressure on the outside bearing surface.  The inner bearing (shaft) side would put undo stress on the bearing and damage it.  your first socket which would apply pressure on the outside is the correct pressure point.

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24 minutes ago, lenore said:

I understand.  Note when I do this process, if the bearing is still noisy or has lateral movement, I replace it.  At my former Company (since retired) I used this process and implemented it and saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in my service industry.  I have found that many manufacturers used little or poor quality grease in the bearings causing premature failure.  I generally have not experienced this with Japanese made bearings.

There's not much lateral play. I'm actually going to keep and experiment with the old bearings. I popped the two black rubber covers off and noticed it was dry (no grease. I went ahead and packed the bearings with hi-temp grease. I'm going to see if this works.

51CF5A34-8BD0-446C-A162-BAA1D2EDAE8C_zps

1611D2A5-01CA-448C-8E4F-73847B7F57CD_zps

8170EE40-6CDE-4E98-8925-83DC1B19016D_zps

 

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So the grease method works. I tried lenore's method and was just curious if it could eliminate the noise. I guess the bearings were still in good shape that it just needed some lube. Even though the new bearings hasn't arrived yet, I'll keep them for backup. But here's me pressing the sleeve back in the old bearings.

 

D8164770-71E7-46E7-B2D7-20333AC4C499_zps

A4B332BA-F13E-447A-B84D-37C03007DCD7_zps

118963F5-6813-4897-BE33-682C35D11BB5_zps

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You are awesome, I shared that procedure years ago and with a few close friends, and now you posted with fantastic pictures of exactly what I do.  Others on this site are going to have heart failure.  After resealing I always spin the bearing and check for leakage.  I will tell you I have never had a failure of this bearing repair.  However if the bearing is shot, than I get rid of it.  Watch for grease sling, but generally if you get the lip of the rubber seal in tight you will be fine. 

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I am just an old ex Navy guy that had to make things work with what you had on hand.

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New bearings came in, here's what they look like.

C3106C15-AA17-42B2-A653-EDA5FB9CEE73_zps

CF3682CD-5987-4AA6-BDA0-B5E7743BD256_zps

089CBB98-7B4D-404A-9B4D-0C86FDB5E4CF_zps

50B2EB39-1164-4B65-9C1C-35D669DADF51_zps

BDB0B21D-9DDE-4A6F-B00B-A7814A280583_zps

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pull the seal off one of those, see how much grease they use....

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