AdBlock Warning

Parts of this website do not function properly with AdBlock enabled on your device. To get the best user experience on our website, please disable Adblock for this website (domain) on your browser.


Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
mnesbit

Mobil 1 Synthetic Oil

38 posts in this topic

I have been using Mobil 1 synthetic 5W30 oil in my '95 LS 400 and I like the results. The engine seems to run smoother and quieter and there have been no leaks.

Does anybody know how many miles Mobil 1 synthetic is good for?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
I have been using Mobil 1 synthetic 5W30 oil in my '95 LS 400 and I like the results. The engine seems to run smoother and quieter and there have been no leaks.

Does anybody know how many miles Mobil 1 synthetic is good for?

It is good for the oil change interval stated in your car's manual. There is no reason to extend beyond that to save a dollar or two. An engine rebuild on a Lexus is absurdly more expensive than what you would save by extending the oil use until it is totally worn out and contaminated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you UOA some people have seen the oil fine for +10k miles.

I personally like 3-4k intervals and use the Full Synthetic Mobil1 5W-30 too.

I know there would be no trouble of even going to 7k....but what can i say.... old habits are hard to break :) plus I have no problem spending $30 for oil every 3k miles.

In the end do what your comfortable with. I like KNOWING that my oil is 100% fresh and new. Just remember, it won't hurt anything to change it sooner rather than later!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, Lexus specifically says that the oil change interval should not be extended when using synthetic oils.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yep, Lexus specifically says that the oil change interval should not be extended when using synthetic oils.

I agree 100% ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that the fast lube industry says Mobil1's claim of extended oil life is true, but recommend changing the oil filter per manufacturer's recommendations.

From Mobil1.com:

Mobil 1 Extended Performance is guaranteed to deliver oil performance and engine protection for 15,000 miles between oil changes. Designed for today's longer oil change intervals, Mobil 1 Extended Performance with the Advanced SuperSyn system helps keep engines running like new and helps extend engine life by reducing wear and oil breakdown. Mobil 1 Extended Performance motor oils have been tested to be fully compatible with engine seals and do not require a special oil filter.

http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/MotorO..._Do_For_Me.aspx

so whats it do? Probably nothing other than cost ~$7.25 per quart. Try it and go run a 1/4 mile and see if it makes you go faster. If not, why use it?

Explore that site and see if there are any test results (other than the Vegas Taxi Cab) which will demonstrate a significant return on investment within a controlled environment.

I've run Slick50, Royal Purple, blah blah... when I thought you get what you pay for. If I had a large investment in a modified engine & drivetrain then I liked the idea of synthetics. But with a sexy drivetrain, I found myself having to drain the boxes more frequently for other reasons. (dumping my freshly contaminated Royal Purple)

For a daily driver, go with standard oil. You probably won't put enough miles on the car to reap significant benefits from synthetics/Teflon/cling-on lubes. That is, unless you intend to drive it for more than ten years... and who does that? Save your money!

I do agree that one should do everything you can to keep an engine running if it is out of warranty. BTW: I am a huge fan of EXTENDED warranties (3rd party). They pay for themselves once a vehicle gets to the ten year mark.

Lexus engines normally tend to die right as the repair costs surpass vehicle's worth. (that is good stuff, kids)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually...Lexus engines don't tend to die...

Lexus motors with 500,000 miles or more are definately out there.

In terms of synthetics, I've run Mobil 1 ever since the vehicle was new, but I still change the oil every 5,000 miles. It doesn't cost $7.50 a quart either, $5 or so a quart, about $2 more than a good conventional oil. More than worth it IMHO for smoother operation, better protection against temperatures especially in engines that run really hot like the 3.0l in the ES.

Thats Mobil 1 "extended performance" which is a marketing ploy. Just use ordinary old Mobil 1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

c.word, I don't understand the reasoning behind some of your comments. Would you mind explaining further?

But with a sexy drivetrain, I found myself having to drain the boxes more frequently for other reasons. (dumping my freshly contaminated Royal Purple)

What has been causing you to have to prematurely drain your "boxes" (do you mean engines?) so often? I've driven some fairly temperamental cars during my 42 years of driving and I can't remember having to do anything like that.

That is, unless you intend to drive it for more than ten years... and who does that?

Well... a lot of members of this forum do exactly that. There are many forum members driving generation one 1990-92 LS400s including a friend who is still driving my first LS400 that I bought in early 1990. That's over 18 years and, I am told, it is doing quite nicely as it nears 270,000 miles.

BTW: I am a huge fan of EXTENDED warranties (3rd party). They pay for themselves once a vehicle gets to the ten year mark.

OK ... I recently retired after over 30 years with one of the top U.S. providers of extended warranties sold by car dealers. Yes, I was a big fan of extended warranties too since they are wildly profitable for both the selling dealer and the warranty company. But they are rarely a good deal for the consumer unless the car model is of particularly low quality or the consumer is cash poor. And what do you mean by "They pay for themselves once a vehicle gets to the ten year mark."?

Lexus engines normally tend to die right as the repair costs surpass vehicle's worth. (that is good stuff, kids)

It is not unusual for the repair costs over a 1 - 3 year period for an older car to exceed the car's market value. That doesn't mean that continuing to drive an older vehicle doesn't make economic sense. Lexus V8 engines can easily go far past 300,000 miles with only routine maintenance. Yes, some external engine components (e.g. power steering pump, alternator) may need replacement but it is extraordinary for the basic engine (bearings, pistons, rings, camshafts, etc.) to fail.

These cars more frequently meet their end when they are crashed and the cost of the crash repair exceeds the car's market value. Or when owners allow the interiors and exteriors to get trashed (scratches, dents, upholstery rips, broken glass) and the cost of repair exceeds the car's market value. Or when the owners never do any maintenance at all.

Hey, PM me and I'll buy you a pint at my favorite bar in O.P. If you are in Kansas City, we can't live all that far apart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5-7k on the 5w-30.....brand new bmw's are recommended at 7-10k i believe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
c.word, I don't understand the reasoning behind some of your comments. Would you mind explaining further?
But with a sexy drivetrain, I found myself having to drain the boxes more frequently for other reasons. (dumping my freshly contaminated Royal Purple)

What has been causing you to have to prematurely drain your "boxes" (do you mean engines?) so often? I've driven some fairly temperamental cars during my 42 years of driving and I can't remember having to do anything like that.

Absolutely! I love explaining! But I can't seem to get the proper quoting format! I will figure it out at some point...

Well no, of course nothing on either Lexus! But I reference cases when I have made “upgrades” to previous vehicles. I have put hours of work, design and planning as well as far too much coin into engines, transmissions, and gearboxes for on and off road use. I am of the opinion that once you seal a motor project (believe it to be DONE/FINISHED) it becomes somewhat of a curse – due to the fact that you believe your work to be perfect. I can triple check all my work, tolerances, and setups but it seems when I do and bolt it together, a defect comes about. Thus resulting in the vague scenario I described. I have an example I will show you (In PV,KS btw) of an AIR "BUBBLE" cast within a RWD pinion shaft which resulted in the pinion gear breaking and dropping into the differential housing wedging between the ring gear and the case.

Now, not that all things are out of my control - I make mistakes, we all do, but often get longer life from my projects when I don't "sweeten them up" (have excessive pride/sense of accomplishment prior to reaching a level of mechanical functionality.) The use of expensive lubricants right off the bench did nothing for the short term mechanical efficiency of the engine/trans/gearbox which I installed. That is my opinion… your results may differ. Additionally, I now EXPECT and PLAN for failures and in doing so, have a higher success rate (mechanical reliability). And I could be wrong. No wait.. Murphy’s Law states something along the same lines.

That is, unless you intend to drive it for more than ten years... and who does that?

Well... a lot of members of this forum do exactly that. There are many forum members driving generation one 1990-92 LS400s including a friend who is still driving my first LS400 which I bought in early 1990. That's over 18 years and, I am told, is doing quite nicely as it nears 270,000 miles.

Apologies and no offense intended. I should have put in some sort of appropriate emoticon post script. I was being sarcastic here... but it didn't look like it because I was bashing the use of synthetics without a defined need such as excessive temp, RPM, and/or turbo lines getting choked by oil coking (not COOKING).

But looking back at this example, I indeed feel that a high mileage engine cannot be miraculously “saved” via the use of synthetic oil once it suddenly reaches ~100/200/300k. Simply switching from a 5w30 conventional to a 5w30 synthetic will not address the issues of a motor with 250k operating in an ambient environment averaging 100 degrees Fahrenheit each day in stop & start traffic. (For example alone – situations may differ) In my opinion, the operator of the vehicle needs to understand the internal conditions of such an aged motor and compensate by switching to thicker multi viscosity oil in extreme driving conditions as detailed above. Yes that may mean running a winter weight different than a summer weight of oil. (GASP!)

I will say that I believe synthetics do have their place - such as a cradle to grave situation which the owner intends to drive it off the showroom floor and put many miles (~100-300k) on the car. Synthetics used from retail purchase onward absolutely extend engine life! I do approve!

Hail old motors! They go faster and make better noise.

I am a huge fan of old B.O.P. big blocks. I snatch them up whenever I can. But it’s not a GM site.

BTW: I am a huge fan of EXTENDED warranties (3rd party). They pay for themselves once a vehicle gets to the ten year mark.

OK ... I recently retired after over 30 years with one of the top U.S. providers of extended warranties sold by car dealers. Yes, I was a big fan of extended warranties too since they are wildly profitable for both the selling dealer and the warranty company. But they are rarely a good deal for the consumer unless the car model is of particularly low quality or the consumer is cash poor. And what do you mean by "They pay for themselves once a vehicle gets to the ten year mark."?

I saw the value in it and it saved me often. Once I collected my complaints and brought them all into the dealer at the same time to best make use of deductible. Previous vehicle (SUV) hit the 10 year mark and the spider gears locked up in the rear end (different case from the earlier mentioned), the front axle seals were dripping everywhere, and it wouldn't shift into 4wd. Oh and the rear wiper wouldn't move when dash button was depressed. Right, so my all my payments to the extended warranty company suddenly were cost effective!!! Very! But again, that’s just my experience. I could handle a $75 monthly payment. I was young and NOT prepared to cover a $5000 rear differential R&R. I viewed it as insurance and I don’t regret it.

I still will not drive a car without a warranty. I don't save, I spend it all at Diamond Joes ;)

Lexus engines normally tend to die right as the repair costs surpass vehicle's worth. (that is good stuff, kids)

It is not unusual for the repair costs over a 1 - 3 year period for an older car to exceed the car's market value. That doesn't mean that continuing to drive an older vehicle doesn't make economic sense. Lexus V8 engines can easily go far past 300,000 miles with only routine maintenance. Yes, some external engine components (e.g. power steering pump, alternator) may need replacement but it is extraordinary for the basic engine (bearings, pistons, rings, camshafts, etc.) to fail.

These cars more frequently meet their end when they are crashed and the cost of the crash repair exceeds the car's market value. Or when owners allow the interiors and exteriors to get trashed (scratches, dents, upholstery rips, broken glass) and the cost of repair exceeds the car's market value. Or when the owners never do any maintenance at all.

Hey, PM me and I'll buy you a pint at my favorite bar in O.P. If you are in Kansas City, we can't live all that far apart.

Agreed! I was speaking of absolute engine failure. Well said however.

Newcastle!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Should I use synthetic in my '92??....I was told not the older engines??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

vroom8 i wouldnt if i were u

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I wouldnt in the 92, sometimes in older engines you can develop leaks if synthetic hasn't been used throughout its life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Python- SW- thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought my 92 LS in 2003, and it had 117k kilometers on it at that time. I switched to Mobil 5W-30 synthetic the month I got it, and it now has 190k on it. It has never burned or leaked a drop of oil in that time. ALL my cars have synthetic, and always have. I had a 62 Mercedes 220b sedan - I rebuilt the engine and used synthetic at 500 miles on the rebuild. That engine used the old style rope crankshaft seal. Never leaked a drop.

If you have no leaks now, go ahead and change it. Check out the Mobil oil website to get their data on what's good and what's not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vroom8, I'll go with SW and python on this one. As SRK mentions, synth

might not create a leak if you have none, however, if your older engine

has gotten a bit loose, you could wind up burning some.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well i've heard both ways on this topic as i work at Napa auto and we sell to many many shops in our area and i always hear feedback on just about every subject....but the molecular structure is different than regular oil and it can create leaks after the engine has a lot of miles on it, mainly from the seals....im not saying this is a fact im just saying i wouldnt chance it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My personal opinion is that you should only pay up for synthetic oil if you are going to run extended oil intervals. The only real proven benefit of synthetic oil that I am aware of is that it does not break down as fast as dino oil. Obviously, if you plan to do this, you should send oil to a lab for a UOA to verify what is a reasonable interval for your specific application. IMO, if you are going to go with manufacturer recommended oil intervals, synthetic oil is a complete waste of money. Any dino oil will fine for 3-5k oil changes.

Personally, I run synthetic oil with an extended oil interval.

Regarding synthetic oil and leaks......if you already have any oil leaks with dino oil, and switch to synthetic, it is almost guaranteed the leaks will be greater with synthetic. It isn't that the oil is bad, but sometimes on an older motor, you may have sludge packed around a seal keeping it from leaking. The better cleaning of the synthetic and the fact that it is a bit slicker may allow it to clean up the sludge and seep out the seals. In that case, the seals probably needed to be replaced anyhow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally, I run synthetic oil with an extended oil interval.

Thats fine, just as long as your realize you are not maintaining your vehicle the way the manufacturer suggests you do so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YES, I can read the owner's manual, and NO, I was not asking for opinions on my decision; I was merely expressing what I do as someone else was asking for opinions on oil. I am perfectly comfortable with how I maintain my vehicles based on experience, and with regard to oil, with UOA. That is by far a better barometer of when to change oil then any manufacturer recommendation; bear in mind that any manufacturer recommendation will be extremely conservative so as to avoid any future liability. I am well out of warranty, so that is a non-issue.

EDIT:

I lied. I do not run an extended oil change interval. After checking, I run the 7,500 mile oil change interval as specified in my owner's manual supplement. A 5,000 mile oil change interval is recommended when you primarily drive under "special operating conditions", which consist of 1) towing a trailer or using a camper or cartop carrier; 2) repeated short trips of less than 5 miles in temperatures below freezing; 3) extensive idling or low speed driving for long distances as in heavy commercial use such as delivery, taxi, or patrol car; 4) operating on rough, muddy, or salt covered roads; 5) operating on unpaved or dusty roads.

Personally, based on experience and UOA, I would not go beyond a 5,000 mile oil change interval with dino oil. Also, based on experience and UOA, I am very comfortable using a 7,500 mile oil change interval with synthetic oil......I know I could easily have a longer oil change interval, but that is beyond my comfort zone. And hey....a 7,500 mile oil change interval is even blessed by the manufacturer.

Given the number of people who use synthetic oil on a short oil change interval, I would be interested in seeing a test with essentially the same vehicles with essentially the same usage, using a 3,000 mile oil change interval, one using synthetic oil and one using dino oil. My expectation is that over long usage, there would be virtually no wear difference between the two engines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YES, I can read the owner's manual, and NO, I was not asking for opinions on my decision; I was merely expressing what I do as someone else was asking for opinions on oil. I am perfectly comfortable with how I maintain my vehicles based on experience, and with regard to oil, with UOA. That is by far a better barometer of when to change oil then any manufacturer recommendation; bear in mind that any manufacturer recommendation will be extremely conservative so as to avoid any future liability. I am well out of warranty, so that is a non-issue.

Okie doke, If you don't want feedback and opinions based on your maintenance practices then don't post them on a public forum.

The entire point of a discussion forum is to discuss things. If you are going to be nasty when someone posts feedback on what you're doing, I don't think a discussion forum is where you want to be.

If you post here, you will be respectful of the posts your fellow members post in response to your statements or you won't post here any longer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't try to sass Steve ;)

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I agree on using synthetic if it is what you started with...however the Lex from the previous owner had Valvoline run in it and that is what I will stick with..lol.. having had many cars and know that switching oils midlife is never a good idea I will stick to what has got it the first 140000 miles with no issues. Just had it inspected and met every requirement with flying colors. So I will not change what has already proved works for that auto. There is so many good oils out there but the breakdown and carbon deposits each leaves might leave alil suppin suppin different... and this is what the rings and valves learn to adjust to.... changing this chemical marriage midlife...could cause a midlife crissis...and no one whats a car with mental or physical issues... If or when I ever have to buy a new one.. Probably ...more than likely go with Mobil 1 until then ... preffer proven over popular... And I always listen read and study the manual ... who knows your car better than the people that built it? :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YES, I can read the owner's manual, and NO, I was not asking for opinions on my decision; I was merely expressing what I do as someone else was asking for opinions on oil. I am perfectly comfortable with how I maintain my vehicles based on experience, and with regard to oil, with UOA. That is by far a better barometer of when to change oil then any manufacturer recommendation; bear in mind that any manufacturer recommendation will be extremely conservative so as to avoid any future liability. I am well out of warranty, so that is a non-issue.

Okie doke, If you don't want feedback and opinions based on your maintenance practices then don't post them on a public forum.

The entire point of a discussion forum is to discuss things. If you are going to be nasty when someone posts feedback on what you're doing, I don't think a discussion forum is where you want to be.

If you post here, you will be respectful of the posts your fellow members post in response to your statements or you won't post here any longer.

Apologies if you thought that my response was "disrespectful". I tried to respond with an honest answer to someone's request. What I got in return was what appears to me as a condescending reply to my submission; from a moderator, no less. I am happy to receive anyone's beneficial suggestions, but I fail to see what was beneficial from your reply. If I state that I run an extended oil change interval, does that not already imply that I know that it is in excess of the manufacturer recommendation? (which, as it turns out, isn't extended after all as explained in my edit). At worst, I responded with sarcasm to what I felt was a disrespectful comment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0